Another Time, Another Place (1958)

95-96 or 98 mins | Melodrama | 2 June 1958

Director:

Lewis Allen

Writer:

Stanley Mann

Cinematographer:

Jack Hildyard

Editor:

Geoffrey Foot

Production Designer:

Tom Monahan
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HISTORY

The title of Lenore Coffee's novel Weep No More was changed to Another Time, Another Place, when it was published in the United States (New York, 1956). Although the film's opening credits imply that the picture marked actor Sean Connery's debut, he had portrayed roles in several earlier films, including his first, the 1954 British release Lilacs in Spring (released in the U.S. as Let's Make Up.) Another Time, Another Place did mark, however, Connery's first featured role in an American film. Paramount press materials claim that producer Joseph Kaufman and star Lana Turner selected Connery for the role of "Mark Trevor" after auditioning over 300 English actors in London.
       Another Time, Another Place was the initial production of Lanturn Productions, a film company owned by Turner. According to MPD, portions of the film were shot on location in London and the Cornwall region of England. Paramount press materials state that scenes set in "St. Giles" were shot in the Cornwall fishing village of Looe.
       According to HR news items, Another Time, Another Place originally was set to be released in Sep 1958, but Paramount chose to rush the recently completed film into theaters in May 1958 in an attempt to capitalize on the publicity surrounding the death of Turner's lover, gangster Johnny Stompanato. On Good Friday, 4 Apr 1958, Stompanato was found dead in Turner's Beverly Hills mansion, stabbed to death with a butcher knife. Turner's fourteen-year-old daughter, Cheryl Crane, was charged with the murder, and following one of the most highly publicized trials in U.S. history, the ...

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The title of Lenore Coffee's novel Weep No More was changed to Another Time, Another Place, when it was published in the United States (New York, 1956). Although the film's opening credits imply that the picture marked actor Sean Connery's debut, he had portrayed roles in several earlier films, including his first, the 1954 British release Lilacs in Spring (released in the U.S. as Let's Make Up.) Another Time, Another Place did mark, however, Connery's first featured role in an American film. Paramount press materials claim that producer Joseph Kaufman and star Lana Turner selected Connery for the role of "Mark Trevor" after auditioning over 300 English actors in London.
       Another Time, Another Place was the initial production of Lanturn Productions, a film company owned by Turner. According to MPD, portions of the film were shot on location in London and the Cornwall region of England. Paramount press materials state that scenes set in "St. Giles" were shot in the Cornwall fishing village of Looe.
       According to HR news items, Another Time, Another Place originally was set to be released in Sep 1958, but Paramount chose to rush the recently completed film into theaters in May 1958 in an attempt to capitalize on the publicity surrounding the death of Turner's lover, gangster Johnny Stompanato. On Good Friday, 4 Apr 1958, Stompanato was found dead in Turner's Beverly Hills mansion, stabbed to death with a butcher knife. Turner's fourteen-year-old daughter, Cheryl Crane, was charged with the murder, and following one of the most highly publicized trials in U.S. history, the death was ruled a justifiable homicide. According to modern sources, gangster Mickey Cohen, angered at being forced to pay Stompanato's burial costs, gave twelve love letters written by Turner to Stompanato during the filming of Another Time, Another Place to an editor of LAHE, and their publication during the trial made front-page news across the country.
       Though it was rumoured in Hollywood for years that Turner had killed Stompanato herself, the actress's career suffered no ill effects from the scandal and her first picture following the murder, the 1959 Universal release Imitation of Life (see entry), was one of the most critically and financially successful films of her career. In her autobiography and all later interviews, Cheryl Crane denied any involvement by her mother in the death, stating that she, herself, had accidentally stabbed Stompanato after hearing him threaten her mother during an argument, precisely as she had testified during her trial thirty years earlier.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Apr 1958
---
Daily Cinema
2 May 1958
---
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1958
p. 3
Film Daily
29 Apr 1958
p. 12
Harrison's Reports
19 Apr 1958
---
Hollywood Citizen-News
10 May 1958
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Nov 1957
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 1958
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1958
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1958
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1958
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1958
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1958
p. 4
Motion Picture Daily
18 Apr 1958
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Apr 1958
p. 800
New York Times
3 May 1958
p. 10
Newsweek
5 May 1958
---
Time
12 May 1958
---
Variety
23 Apr 1958
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Joseph Kaufman's Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Asst prod for Lanturn Productions
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Raincoats by
MUSIC
Mus comp
SOUND
Sd rec
Sd rec
Dubbing ed
MAKEUP
Hairdressing
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Cont
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Weep No More by Lenore Coffee (London, 1955).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Another Time, Another Place," music and lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 June 1958
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 2 May 1958
Production Date:
early Oct 1957--10 Jan 1958 at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Boreham Wood, Elstree, England
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Kaydor Productions (U.K.) Ltd.
15 April 1958
LP10702
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
VistaVision Motion Picture High-Fidelity
Duration(in mins):
95-96 or 98
Length(in feet):
8,593
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18891
SYNOPSIS

In London, 1945, BBC radio correspondent Mark Trevor broadcasts to his listeners the details surrounding the disarmament of an unexploded German V-2 rocket. He is soon joined in the field by Sara Scott, a foreign correspondent for The New York Standard . The two journalists have been lovers for three weeks, and although Sara declares her undying love for him, Mark is hesitant to state his true affections for her. Later, in her hotel room, Mark tells Sara how he grew up in the small English village of St. Giles and joined the BBC prior to the outbreak of World War II, but Sara points out that eleven years are missing from his life story. After Mark finally professes his love, Sara confesses that she is engaged to her boss, American newspaper publisher Carter Reynolds. Before she can break her engagement, however, Mark admits that he is married. Carter then arrives in London on his way to Paris, and quickly recognizes the sudden alienation of Sara's affections. He offers to take her with him to Paris or back to New York, but the heartbroken Sara insists on staying in London until she can settle her personal life. Following the German army's surrender in Italy, Mark is transferred to Paris, but before he leaves, he and Sara have one final meeting at which they proclaim their eternal love to each other. The next morning, Carter rushes to be with Sara before the BBC announces Mark's death, as he was just killed in an airplane crash. Sara then suffers a nervous breakdown and is institutionalized in ...

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In London, 1945, BBC radio correspondent Mark Trevor broadcasts to his listeners the details surrounding the disarmament of an unexploded German V-2 rocket. He is soon joined in the field by Sara Scott, a foreign correspondent for The New York Standard . The two journalists have been lovers for three weeks, and although Sara declares her undying love for him, Mark is hesitant to state his true affections for her. Later, in her hotel room, Mark tells Sara how he grew up in the small English village of St. Giles and joined the BBC prior to the outbreak of World War II, but Sara points out that eleven years are missing from his life story. After Mark finally professes his love, Sara confesses that she is engaged to her boss, American newspaper publisher Carter Reynolds. Before she can break her engagement, however, Mark admits that he is married. Carter then arrives in London on his way to Paris, and quickly recognizes the sudden alienation of Sara's affections. He offers to take her with him to Paris or back to New York, but the heartbroken Sara insists on staying in London until she can settle her personal life. Following the German army's surrender in Italy, Mark is transferred to Paris, but before he leaves, he and Sara have one final meeting at which they proclaim their eternal love to each other. The next morning, Carter rushes to be with Sara before the BBC announces Mark's death, as he was just killed in an airplane crash. Sara then suffers a nervous breakdown and is institutionalized in a nursing home for six weeks. With the war now over, Carter offers to send Sara home on an ocean cruise following her convalescence, but she decides takes a train to St. Giles before setting sail for America. Arriving in the seaside town, Sara is unable to find any accommodations, as the post-war surge in tourism has filled all the local inns, but she meets Mark's young son Brian by chance and is soon invited to dinner by her dead lover's unsuspecting widow Kay. Though Kay offers her lodgings for the night, the grief-stricken Sara cannot stand being surrounded by Mark's things and bolts from the home. The next morning, Sara is found on the docks unconscious and is carried back to Kay's house, where she is ordered to rest by the local physician. Kay then convinces Sara to stay on in St. Giles and write a book about Mark, still unaware that Sara was her husband's mistress. Later, Sara is shocked to see Alan Thompson, Mark's childhood friend and co-worker, who somehow survived the plane crash that took her lover's life. Though he promises to keep her secret, Alan asks Sara to leave St. Giles before Kay learns the truth about her relationship with Mark. Meanwhile, back in New York, Carter is informed by Dr. Aldridge, Sara's physician at the nursing home, of her current whereabouts, and he rushes to St. Giles in hopes of bringing Sara home. Upon their first meeting, Carter and Alan quickly realize that they are in similar positions, as they both love women who are in love with the same dead man. Following an evening at the cinema, Kay questions Alan about her husband's final weeks, and she soon surmises that Mark was having an affair. Learning this, Sara confesses all to Kay, but tells the widow that Mark had ended their affair and was planning to return to his wife and child. The next morning, Kay, relieved, rushes to the train station to say goodbye to a thankful Sara, who then promises to send Brian a photograph from the top of the Empire State building.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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