China Doll (1958)

99 mins | Drama | August 1958

Director:

Frank Borzage

Writer:

Kitty Buhler

Producer:

Frank Borzage

Cinematographer:

William H. Clothier

Editor:

Jack Murray

Production Designer:

Howard Richmond
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HISTORY

This film's working title was Time Is a Memory . A closing title card states: "Our sincere thanks to the Department of Defense and the United States Air Force for the cooperation in the making of this picture." Although some sources list the film's running time as eighty-eight minutes, the Var review gives it as ninety-nine minutes, the length of the print viewed. According to HR news items, most exteriors for the film were shot in Saugus, CA, in and around the Kunming Airfield.
       HR news items add Gretchen Thomas to the film, but her appearance in the film has not been confirmed. China Doll was the first of two co-productions between Batjac and Romina Productions. Their second production was Escort West (1959, see ... More Less

This film's working title was Time Is a Memory . A closing title card states: "Our sincere thanks to the Department of Defense and the United States Air Force for the cooperation in the making of this picture." Although some sources list the film's running time as eighty-eight minutes, the Var review gives it as ninety-nine minutes, the length of the print viewed. According to HR news items, most exteriors for the film were shot in Saugus, CA, in and around the Kunming Airfield.
       HR news items add Gretchen Thomas to the film, but her appearance in the film has not been confirmed. China Doll was the first of two co-productions between Batjac and Romina Productions. Their second production was Escort West (1959, see below). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Aug 1958.
---
Daily Variety
4 Aug 58
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Aug 58
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1957
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1957
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 57
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1957
p. 4, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 58
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Aug 58
p. 929.
New York Times
4 Dec 58
p. 52.
Variety
20 Aug 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Romina Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Frankie and Johnnie," traditional.
SONGS
"Suppose," words and music by By Dunham and Henry Vars.
COMPOSERS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Time Is a Memory
Release Date:
August 1958
Production Date:
began 15 August 1957 at the Samuel Goldwyn Studios and RKO-Pathé Studio
Copyright Claimant:
Batjac Enterprises, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1958
Copyright Number:
LP12609
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
99
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18803
SYNOPSIS

In China, in 1943, after the Japanese have cut off supply lines and American pilots are ferrying food, medical supplies and refugees, Capt. Cliff Brandon lands at the American air base in Kunming after a flight from India. Cliff, who has been saddled with an inexperienced crew, has become demoralized and morose as a result of his war experiences and spends most of his free time drinking in Sadie's Place, a local bar where he is often propositioned by young women. One night, Cliff leaves the bar in a drunken state and encounters an old man in the street, who offers him the company of a young woman. Unable to communicate with the old man, Cliff wakes up the next morning to find that the girl, Shu-Jen, has followed him home and intends to stay. Father Cairns, a priest who operates St. Joseph's Mission, visits Cliff for coffee, and Cliff quickly explains the misunderstanding about the girl, then orders Ellington, a young Chinese boy who spends time at the airfield, to get rid of her. Later, after Cairns finds Shu-Jen outside Sadie's expecting to get a job as a "hostess," he takes her with him to the mission. When Cliff visits Cairns for a game of chess, the priest explains that Shu-Jen is one of eleven children, three of whom have died, and that Cliff, in his drunken state, agreed to hire her as a bonded servant for three months. Cairns adds that pride decrees that she act as his housekeeper and that the money will certainly help her family. Initially, Cliff refuses, but relents and takes Shu-Jen to Alice Nichols, an American Red Cross canteen worker, to find ... +


In China, in 1943, after the Japanese have cut off supply lines and American pilots are ferrying food, medical supplies and refugees, Capt. Cliff Brandon lands at the American air base in Kunming after a flight from India. Cliff, who has been saddled with an inexperienced crew, has become demoralized and morose as a result of his war experiences and spends most of his free time drinking in Sadie's Place, a local bar where he is often propositioned by young women. One night, Cliff leaves the bar in a drunken state and encounters an old man in the street, who offers him the company of a young woman. Unable to communicate with the old man, Cliff wakes up the next morning to find that the girl, Shu-Jen, has followed him home and intends to stay. Father Cairns, a priest who operates St. Joseph's Mission, visits Cliff for coffee, and Cliff quickly explains the misunderstanding about the girl, then orders Ellington, a young Chinese boy who spends time at the airfield, to get rid of her. Later, after Cairns finds Shu-Jen outside Sadie's expecting to get a job as a "hostess," he takes her with him to the mission. When Cliff visits Cairns for a game of chess, the priest explains that Shu-Jen is one of eleven children, three of whom have died, and that Cliff, in his drunken state, agreed to hire her as a bonded servant for three months. Cairns adds that pride decrees that she act as his housekeeper and that the money will certainly help her family. Initially, Cliff refuses, but relents and takes Shu-Jen to Alice Nichols, an American Red Cross canteen worker, to find clean clothes for her. Meanwhile, Dan O'Neill, one of Cliff's crew, is romancing Mona Perkins, another Red Cross volunteer. At his home, Cliff instructs Ellington to tell Shu-Jen that she is to be only his housekeeper, then asks the boy to stay with him as house guest and chaperon. After Col. Wiley assigns Cliff to fly refugees to Calcutta, he returns with medical supplies for Cairns and a small brooch for Shu-Jen. However, Cliff has a malaria attack and, delirious, allows Shu-Jen to lie beside him for comfort. Cliff recovers, but goes to tell Cairns that "something happened" and that Shu-Jen should go home. Upon discovering that Shu-Jen is pregnant, Alice, a war widow who has become romantically involved with crew member Phil Gates, tells Cliff that he has neither honor, nor decency. When Cliff returns home, he finds that Shu-Jen has just left for her home. Cliff drives after her, finds her and tells her that, although it has taken him a while to realize it, he is in love with her. However, when Cliff enlists Ellington's help in formally proposing marriage, Shu-Jen declines, fearful that their marriage will create problems for him. With Cairns's help, Cliff finally convinces Shu-Jen, and they are married in a traditional Chinese ceremony. At the ceremony, Wiley tells Cliff and his crew that they have to leave the next day to fly out of a different base. Later, Cliff, now a changed man, receives word that Shu-Jen has had a baby girl and a few weeks later, when Alice and Mona are reassigned to the same base, they bring Shu-Jen, who has learned some English, the baby and Ellington with them. After a successful mission to drop supplies to troops on an offensive in Burma, Cliff and his crew learn that their airbase is being bombed by the Japanese. Although fired on by enemy planes, Cliff manages to land and plans to evacuate the base. Tragically, he learns that Shu-Jen has been killed in the attack and that the baby is missing. As Wylie has also been killed, Cliff is now in command and orders the plane to leave without him. Cliff then goes back to where Shu-Jen was killed and hears a baby crying. In a pile of rubble, Cliff finds his daughter alive, under the body of Ellington, who died protecting her. A Japanese plane returns to strafe the base and Cliff is hit. He places his identification tags in the baby's hands, then mans an anti-aircraft gun and shoots down several planes before being killed in a direct hit. In 1957, at Los Angeles International Airport, Alice and Phil, Dan and Mona, and others from Cliff's crew eagerly await the arrival of a flight. After many years of searching, Father Cairns has located Cliff and Shu-Jen's daughter in an orphanage in Hong Kong and has sent her to America to be looked after by her parents' friends. A teenager, displaying Cliff's dog tags, descends the steps from the plane, and they all embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.