King of Gamblers (1937)

78 mins | Romance | 23 April 1937

Director:

Robert Florey

Writer:

Doris Anderson

Producer:

Paul Jones

Cinematographer:

Harry Fischbeck

Editor:

Harvey Johnston

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Robert Odell

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working titles for this film were The Kid from Paradise and King of the Gamblers . A modern source lists an alternate title of Czar of the Slot-Machines , and notes that an opening sequence of "Jim Adams" being jilted by "Joyce Beaton" (who, according to the Call Bureau Cast Service, was played by Louise Brooks) was shot but was eliminated from the final cut. Helen Burgess, age eighteen, died 7 Apr 1937, a few days before this film's preview, from ... More Less

The working titles for this film were The Kid from Paradise and King of the Gamblers . A modern source lists an alternate title of Czar of the Slot-Machines , and notes that an opening sequence of "Jim Adams" being jilted by "Joyce Beaton" (who, according to the Call Bureau Cast Service, was played by Louise Brooks) was shot but was eliminated from the final cut. Helen Burgess, age eighteen, died 7 Apr 1937, a few days before this film's preview, from pneumonia. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Apr 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
16 Apr 37
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 37
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 37
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 37
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 37
p. 1, 3
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
16 Apr 37
p. 9.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Apr 37
p. 48.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Apr 37
p. 38, 43
New York Times
3 Jul 37
p. 18.
Variety
7 Jul 37
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Contr to trmt
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hate to Talk About Myself," music and lyrics by Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin and Richard A. Whiting
"I'm Feelin' High," music and lyrics by Burton Lane and Ralph Freed.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
King of the Gamblers
The Kid from Paradise
Release Date:
23 April 1937
Production Date:
late February--mid March 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 April 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7103
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

A barbershop, caught between competing slot-machine combines, is bombed by a passing car. Discovering that children were killed in the explosion, gangster Steve Kalkas executes the man responsible. Kalkas arrives at the Palm Parade nightclub to hear Dixie Moore sing and is greeted by maitre'd Eddie. J. G. Temple, a former associate of Kalkas, who is in debt, propositions Dixie's friend Jackie Nolan for a quick trip to Havana. Eddie interrupts Dixie to auction her kisses, but she chooses a drunk reporter, Jim Adams, over Kalkas. After Eddie has Jim knocked out, she takes him home and the next morning calls his editor, George Kramer, and gives him her own $500 to make up for what he spent at the auction. Kramer then sends Jim to London on assignment to help him forget his fiancée, Joyce Beaton, who is marrying another man. Meanwhile, Dixie and Jackie quarrel over her unexpected departure to Havana with Temple. Kalkas, who sincerely loves Dixie, offers to marry her, but she does not love him, so he buys her an expensive apartment. After Kalkas receives word that the governor is appointing a special prosecutor named Briggs to investigate the bombing, he has Temple killed and sends Temple's girl to Big Edna, an experienced moll, without realizing she is Jackie. Back from London, Jim visits Dixie, and when Jackie's body is found in the river, he goes with Dixie to the hospital to identify her. Kramer assigns Jim the slot-machine story and he investigates Big Edna's seedy dive and finds Jackie's clothes. There he hears Big Edna dialing "Circle-1010" on the telepone phone before escaping. Dixie asks ... +


A barbershop, caught between competing slot-machine combines, is bombed by a passing car. Discovering that children were killed in the explosion, gangster Steve Kalkas executes the man responsible. Kalkas arrives at the Palm Parade nightclub to hear Dixie Moore sing and is greeted by maitre'd Eddie. J. G. Temple, a former associate of Kalkas, who is in debt, propositions Dixie's friend Jackie Nolan for a quick trip to Havana. Eddie interrupts Dixie to auction her kisses, but she chooses a drunk reporter, Jim Adams, over Kalkas. After Eddie has Jim knocked out, she takes him home and the next morning calls his editor, George Kramer, and gives him her own $500 to make up for what he spent at the auction. Kramer then sends Jim to London on assignment to help him forget his fiancée, Joyce Beaton, who is marrying another man. Meanwhile, Dixie and Jackie quarrel over her unexpected departure to Havana with Temple. Kalkas, who sincerely loves Dixie, offers to marry her, but she does not love him, so he buys her an expensive apartment. After Kalkas receives word that the governor is appointing a special prosecutor named Briggs to investigate the bombing, he has Temple killed and sends Temple's girl to Big Edna, an experienced moll, without realizing she is Jackie. Back from London, Jim visits Dixie, and when Jackie's body is found in the river, he goes with Dixie to the hospital to identify her. Kramer assigns Jim the slot-machine story and he investigates Big Edna's seedy dive and finds Jackie's clothes. There he hears Big Edna dialing "Circle-1010" on the telepone phone before escaping. Dixie asks Kalkas for his help, but Jim is wary of him, so they agree to meet the police commissioner at Kalkas' office. Despite Dixie's involvement with Kalkas, Jim wants to marry her. After Jim has left, Dixie remembers hearing the number "Circle-1010" and, dialing it, discovers it is Kalkas' private line. Kalkas prepares to execute Jim by pushing him down an elevator shaft, as he did with Temple; however, when he realizes the police are on their way, he calls the elevator up for a quick escape. A gunfight ensues, during which Dixie rushes to save Jim from the elevator. Unaware it has moved, Kalkas falls to his death. Relieved that Jim has survived, Dixie leaves with him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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