The Texas Rangers (1936)

93 or 95 mins | Western | 28 August 1936

Director:

King Vidor

Writer:

Louis Stevens

Producer:

King Vidor

Cinematographer:

Edward Cronjager

Editor:

Doane Harrison

Production Designers:

Hans Dreier, Bernard Herzbrun

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a HR news item, Paramount considered changing the title of the film to Lone Star Rangers because Columbia Pictures had already titled a picture Texas Rangers . The song "Alla en rancho grande" was derived from files at the Texas Folk-Lore Society and was sung by Elena Martinez. At the time of this film's release, Texas was celebrating its centennial. Press releases also give the following information: Over 500 actors and members of two Indian tribes (Navajo and Zuni) were employed, particularly for the 1876 battle scene. This scene was reportedly a re-enactment of a famous 1876 battle in which Vicorio, a nephew of Geronimo, led the Apaches against the Texas Rangers and Union Army soldiers. A former governor of New Mexico, Clyde Tingley, performed in this film. Governor James Allred of Texas directed the opening scene over the phone. Maria Martinez of the San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo, who was famous for her distinctive black pottery, was used as a walk-on in one scene. Bennie Bartlett's real-life mother played his character's doomed homesteader mother. The role of Jim Hawkins was originally slated for Gary Cooper, who was filming This Breed of Men at the time. Paramount felt it was inappropriate to release two "outdoor pictures" with the star concurrently and therefore cast Fred MacMurray. According to DV , production was held up for a few days due to a severe dust storm near Gallup, NM. Unlike most of his previous films, Jack Oakie's character meets his death in this film. (One year earlier, however, Twentieth Century changed the ending of The Call ... More Less

According to a HR news item, Paramount considered changing the title of the film to Lone Star Rangers because Columbia Pictures had already titled a picture Texas Rangers . The song "Alla en rancho grande" was derived from files at the Texas Folk-Lore Society and was sung by Elena Martinez. At the time of this film's release, Texas was celebrating its centennial. Press releases also give the following information: Over 500 actors and members of two Indian tribes (Navajo and Zuni) were employed, particularly for the 1876 battle scene. This scene was reportedly a re-enactment of a famous 1876 battle in which Vicorio, a nephew of Geronimo, led the Apaches against the Texas Rangers and Union Army soldiers. A former governor of New Mexico, Clyde Tingley, performed in this film. Governor James Allred of Texas directed the opening scene over the phone. Maria Martinez of the San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo, who was famous for her distinctive black pottery, was used as a walk-on in one scene. Bennie Bartlett's real-life mother played his character's doomed homesteader mother. The role of Jim Hawkins was originally slated for Gary Cooper, who was filming This Breed of Men at the time. Paramount felt it was inappropriate to release two "outdoor pictures" with the star concurrently and therefore cast Fred MacMurray. According to DV , production was held up for a few days due to a severe dust storm near Gallup, NM. Unlike most of his previous films, Jack Oakie's character meets his death in this film. (One year earlier, however, Twentieth Century changed the ending of The Call of the Wild after audiences protested the death of Oakie's character.) Contemporary sources note that Fred MacMurray sings a love song in the film. However, the viewed print did not contain this scene. According to press releases, the oldest operating train engine, "Montezuma No. 1," built in 1881, was used in a hold-up scene filmed in New Mexico. A 125-year-old building in Gallup, NM, the oldest building in town, was used as a sound stage for the Ranger office building. The exterior shots of the Ranger office were taken at an old nearby Indian pueblo. The film was shot on location in Gallup and Santa Fe, NM and in TX. Producer King Vidor notes in an interview that some scenes were also filmed in Santo Domingo, NM. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9-May-36
---
Daily Variety
18 Aug 36
p. 3.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 36
p. 1.
Film Daily
22 Aug 36
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 36
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 36
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
20 Aug 36
p. 9.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Apr 36
p. 45.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Aug 36
p. 44.
New York Times
24 Sep 36
p. 29.
Variety
30 Sep 36
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2nd unit dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
2nd unit photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book The Texas Rangers by Walter Prescott Webb (Boston, 1935).
SONGS
"The Texas Rangers' Song," words and music by Sam Coslow and Harry Behn
"Purple Shadows," words and music by Phil Boutelje and Sam Coslow
"I Can't Play the Banjo with Susanna on My Knee," words and music by Phil Boutelje and Jack Scholl
+
SONGS
"The Texas Rangers' Song," words and music by Sam Coslow and Harry Behn
"Purple Shadows," words and music by Phil Boutelje and Sam Coslow
"I Can't Play the Banjo with Susanna on My Knee," words and music by Phil Boutelje and Jack Scholl
"Alla En Rancho Grande," traditional
and traditional Indian songs.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Lone Star Rangers
Release Date:
28 August 1936
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Dallas, TX: 21 August 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 August 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6567
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
93 or 95
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2391
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After three bandits, Henry B. "Wahoo" Jones, Jim Hawkins and Sam McGee, split up to evade the law, Wahoo and Jim join the Texas Rangers. While patrolling for cattle rustlers, they meet up wih Sam, and the three men agree to use inside information from the Rangers to plan some heists. On their way back to the outpost, Jim and Wahoo try to rescue some homesteaders from an Indian raid, but save only a young boy, David, who thereafter idolizes them as heroes. They bring David to the Rangers' encampment, where Major Bailey's daughter Amanda undertakes to rear him properly. Amanda takes a liking to Jim, but he avoids her. Later, the Rangers fight with a tribe of hostile Indians in an effort to get them onto a reservation. A great number of Rangers are killed, but Jim becomes a hero when he manages to kill several Indians singlehandedly and bring another company of Rangers to help with the battle. Despite his honest heroic efforts, Jim still plans to rustle cattle with Sam, but the injured Wahoo bows out. Before Jim leaves for his new assignment in Kimball County, where he is to arrest an outlaw, he and Amanda fall in love. Jim brings law and order to Kimball County, and the residents gift him with a ranch. His experience there causes him to have a change of heart, and he cancels his deal with Sam, asking him to clear out of the area. When much of Texas is terrorized by the "Polka-Dot" bandit, so identified by the bandana he wears, Jim realizes the bandit is Sam. The major orders ... +


After three bandits, Henry B. "Wahoo" Jones, Jim Hawkins and Sam McGee, split up to evade the law, Wahoo and Jim join the Texas Rangers. While patrolling for cattle rustlers, they meet up wih Sam, and the three men agree to use inside information from the Rangers to plan some heists. On their way back to the outpost, Jim and Wahoo try to rescue some homesteaders from an Indian raid, but save only a young boy, David, who thereafter idolizes them as heroes. They bring David to the Rangers' encampment, where Major Bailey's daughter Amanda undertakes to rear him properly. Amanda takes a liking to Jim, but he avoids her. Later, the Rangers fight with a tribe of hostile Indians in an effort to get them onto a reservation. A great number of Rangers are killed, but Jim becomes a hero when he manages to kill several Indians singlehandedly and bring another company of Rangers to help with the battle. Despite his honest heroic efforts, Jim still plans to rustle cattle with Sam, but the injured Wahoo bows out. Before Jim leaves for his new assignment in Kimball County, where he is to arrest an outlaw, he and Amanda fall in love. Jim brings law and order to Kimball County, and the residents gift him with a ranch. His experience there causes him to have a change of heart, and he cancels his deal with Sam, asking him to clear out of the area. When much of Texas is terrorized by the "Polka-Dot" bandit, so identified by the bandana he wears, Jim realizes the bandit is Sam. The major orders Jim to bring the bandit in dead or alive, but out of friendship for Sam, Jim refuses and resigns from the Rangers, after which the major reluctantly arrests him for his previous illegal activity. Loyal to Jim, Wahoo sets out to capture Sam with the help of little David. Sam kills Wahoo and returns his body to the Rangers, then kidnaps David. Jim is released from jail. Outraged by Wahoo's senseless death, he rescues David, whom Sam has imprisoned. Although reluctant to kill Sam, Jim is forced to shoot him when he refuses to give himself up. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.