Hound-Dog Man (1959)

87 mins | Drama | November 1959

Director:

Don Siegel

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Charles G. Clarke

Editor:

Louis Loeffler

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Walter M. Simonds

Production Company:

Company of Artists, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Wild in the Country . Twentieth Century-Fox later used that title for a 1961 Elvis Presley film (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1951-60 .) Although Ken Darby is officially credited onscreen as song writer, other writers wrote the songs included in the film. According to a Jun 1952 LAEx news item, Ida Lupino and Collier Young bought the rights to Fred Gipson's story in 1952, and hoped to star Robert Mitchum in the screen adaptation. In Apr 1959, a DV news item announced that William Wellman was to direct, and that Wellman and Wald wanted Lindsay Crosby and David Ladd to star.
       Although a Jun 1959 HR news item states that Sammy Cahn was to team with Lionel Newman on the score, the extent of Cahn's contribution to the completed picture has not been determined. A Jul 1959 HR news item adds that Teddy Rooney was initially slated to play "Spud McKinney." A Jul 1959 HR news item announced that Craig Hill was being considered for a role, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.
       According to studio publicity contained in the film's publicity file at the AMPAS Library, location filming was done at the studio ranch in Malibu, CA and at Big Bear, CA. Hound-Dog Man marked the screen debut of pop singer and teen idol Fabian, who had a hit recording of the film's title song. In his autobiography, director Don Siegel stated that he was opposed to having Fabian sing in the film, but was ... More Less

The working title of this film was Wild in the Country . Twentieth Century-Fox later used that title for a 1961 Elvis Presley film (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1951-60 .) Although Ken Darby is officially credited onscreen as song writer, other writers wrote the songs included in the film. According to a Jun 1952 LAEx news item, Ida Lupino and Collier Young bought the rights to Fred Gipson's story in 1952, and hoped to star Robert Mitchum in the screen adaptation. In Apr 1959, a DV news item announced that William Wellman was to direct, and that Wellman and Wald wanted Lindsay Crosby and David Ladd to star.
       Although a Jun 1959 HR news item states that Sammy Cahn was to team with Lionel Newman on the score, the extent of Cahn's contribution to the completed picture has not been determined. A Jul 1959 HR news item adds that Teddy Rooney was initially slated to play "Spud McKinney." A Jul 1959 HR news item announced that Craig Hill was being considered for a role, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.
       According to studio publicity contained in the film's publicity file at the AMPAS Library, location filming was done at the studio ranch in Malibu, CA and at Big Bear, CA. Hound-Dog Man marked the screen debut of pop singer and teen idol Fabian, who had a hit recording of the film's title song. In his autobiography, director Don Siegel stated that he was opposed to having Fabian sing in the film, but was overruled by Wald. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
2 Nov 1959.
---
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1959.
---
Daily Variety
29 Oct 59
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Oct 59
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 59
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 59
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 59
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 59
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 59
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 59
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1959
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 59
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
25 Jun 1952.
---
New York Times
28 Apr 60
p. 29.
Variety
4 Nov 59
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set dresser
Props
COSTUMES
Cost des
DANCE
Dances staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Best boy
Boom op
Casting
Casting
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Hound Dog Man by Fred Gipson (New York, 1949).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Hound Dog Man," words and music by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
"What Big Boy?" words and music by Sol Ponti and Frankie Avalon
"This Friendly World," "Single," "I'm Growing Up" and "Pretty Little Girl," words and music by Robert Marcucci and Pete De Angelis
+
SONGS
"Hound Dog Man," words and music by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
"What Big Boy?" words and music by Sol Ponti and Frankie Avalon
"This Friendly World," "Single," "I'm Growing Up" and "Pretty Little Girl," words and music by Robert Marcucci and Pete De Angelis
"Got the Feeling" and "Hay Foot Straw-Foot," words and music by Richard Sherman and Robert Sherman.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Wild in the Country
Release Date:
November 1959
Production Date:
late July--late August 1959
Copyright Claimant:
Company of Artists, Inc. and Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 October 1959
Copyright Number:
LP14947
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
87
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19431
SYNOPSIS

In the rural South, Clint McKinney and his younger brother Spud talk their steadfast, straight-laced father Aaron into letting them go on a hunting trip with their slightly older, rambunctious friend Blackie Scantling. Although the boys's prim mother Cora views Blackie as a shiftless, womanizing scoundrel, and believes that her boys are squandering precious time by pursuing animals rather than their studies, she reluctantly agrees to the trip. As the three head out, accompanied by Blackie's hounds, Clint declares that the jaunt into the wild away from the family farm will mark his passage into manhood. While following the trajectory of the river, the three come upon fresh-faced Dony Waller, the daughter of eccentric dreamer Fiddling Tom Waller, and her friend, Dave Wilson, who is intent on taming a wild bronco in the river currents. Soon after, the blustery Hog Peyson appears and worries that the hunters will endanger his hogs, who graze along the river. Later, the hogs invade the boys's camp and after Blackie's hounds chase them away, Peyson appears, gun in hand, threatening to kill the dogs for biting his pigs. Clint and Blackie quickly react by jumping Peyson, pulling the rifle from his hand and sending the dogs after him. After Clint shoots a turkey, he decides to give it to Mrs. Waller to prepare, using the bird as an excuse to see Dony once more. At the Waller farm, Blackie steals a kiss from Dony, but she demands commitment, not just romance. Later, Mrs. Waller warns her daughter that Blackie is not the marrying kind. While at the farm, Spud befriends the family's skittish puppy. Spud, Clint ... +


In the rural South, Clint McKinney and his younger brother Spud talk their steadfast, straight-laced father Aaron into letting them go on a hunting trip with their slightly older, rambunctious friend Blackie Scantling. Although the boys's prim mother Cora views Blackie as a shiftless, womanizing scoundrel, and believes that her boys are squandering precious time by pursuing animals rather than their studies, she reluctantly agrees to the trip. As the three head out, accompanied by Blackie's hounds, Clint declares that the jaunt into the wild away from the family farm will mark his passage into manhood. While following the trajectory of the river, the three come upon fresh-faced Dony Waller, the daughter of eccentric dreamer Fiddling Tom Waller, and her friend, Dave Wilson, who is intent on taming a wild bronco in the river currents. Soon after, the blustery Hog Peyson appears and worries that the hunters will endanger his hogs, who graze along the river. Later, the hogs invade the boys's camp and after Blackie's hounds chase them away, Peyson appears, gun in hand, threatening to kill the dogs for biting his pigs. Clint and Blackie quickly react by jumping Peyson, pulling the rifle from his hand and sending the dogs after him. After Clint shoots a turkey, he decides to give it to Mrs. Waller to prepare, using the bird as an excuse to see Dony once more. At the Waller farm, Blackie steals a kiss from Dony, but she demands commitment, not just romance. Later, Mrs. Waller warns her daughter that Blackie is not the marrying kind. While at the farm, Spud befriends the family's skittish puppy. Spud, Clint and Blackie are forced to make a hasty exit when Blackie brings a tomcat into the house and the terrified animal breaks Mrs. Waller's good luck plate. That night, the Wallers' shy pup follows Spud to camp, and the boy names him Spot. When Spot finds Dave, thrown from his horse and lying unconscious in the river with a broken leg, Blackie sends Clint to town to fetch Doc Cole. There, Clint become jealous when he spots Nita Stringer, a young girl whose romantic overtures he had earlier rebuffed, strolling down the street with Terminus Dooley. Doc drives Clint to the Wilson farm, and soon after, the neighbors congregate to help set Dave's leg and cheer him up. When the congregation turns into a celebration, the couples begin to dance. Clint's jealousy is further aroused when Nita pairs with Terminus, and after storming out of the barn, Clint takes a swig of whiskey from Peyson's jug. Sussie Belle, Peyson's alluring new bride, asks Blackie to dance, but the music ends abruptly when a drunken Clint picks a fight with Terminus. Soon after, the McKinneys arrive and Blackie dunks Clint in the water trough to sober him up. Later, Sussie Belle lures Blackie into a deserted shack to seduce him, but he rejects her advances. Noticing his wife's absence, Peyson suspects that she has shared a romantic tryst with Blackie and so points his rifle at him. To save Blackie's life, Dony jeopardizes her own reputation by lying that she, not Sussie Belle, was with Blackie. Aaron then steps forward and sternly orders the hot-headed Peyson to drop his gun and go home. Impressed by his father's courage, Clint decides to return home with his parents. Before leaving, he apologizes to Nita, who then admits that she was using Terminus to make Clint jealous. Cora, deaf to Mrs. Wilson's entreaties to allow Spud to keep his beloved pup, carries her slumbering son to the wagon, leaving his dog behind. When Spot lopes alongside the wagon, however, Spud jumps down and embraces him, and Cora relents and welcomes the dog to their family. Later, Blackie seeks out Dony in the woods and, after informing her that he has at last decided to settle down, asks her to marry him. At dawn, the McKinneys arrive at their farm, happy to be back home. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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