The Night Fighters (1960)

85 or 88-90 mins | Drama | September 1960

Director:

Tay Garnett

Producer:

Raymond Stross

Cinematographer:

Stephen Dade

Editor:

Peter Tanner

Production Designer:

John Stoll

Production Company:

D.R.M. Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of the film, and the title under which it was released in Britain, was A Terrible Beauty , the title of the novel on which it is based. After the opening credits, a written prologue superimposed over a shot of a road sign pointing to Londonderry, reads: "In a campaign timed to coincide with the German Invasion of England, IRA groups were reformed all over the North. Even in farming communities where the war, as yet, was little more than newspaper headlines." As noted in the Var review, the film was shot in Dublin, "in and around the Ardmore Studios." HR production charts list the production company as Cineman Productions, although screen credits and reviews only list it as D.R.M. D.R.M. Productions and Raymond Stross are listed as the producers on reviews and onscreen. D.R.M. Productions was owned by Robert Mitchum.
       Although his name does not appear in other sources, a Feb 1959 HR news item reported that Richard Collins collaborated on the screenplay with Robert Wright Campbell. Collins' contribution to the screenplay has not been determined. Although a Feb 1959 HR news item reported that negotiations to cast Dana Wynter were taking place, and an Aug 1959 HR news item stated that director Tay Garnett "was tagging" famed Irish playwright Brendan Behan for a role, neither Wynter nor Behan appeared in the film. Although his appearance in the film has not been confirmed, an Aug 1959 HR news item reported that Stross also cast Robert Briscoe, Lord Mayor of Dublin, in the film. According to modern sources, ... More Less

The working title of the film, and the title under which it was released in Britain, was A Terrible Beauty , the title of the novel on which it is based. After the opening credits, a written prologue superimposed over a shot of a road sign pointing to Londonderry, reads: "In a campaign timed to coincide with the German Invasion of England, IRA groups were reformed all over the North. Even in farming communities where the war, as yet, was little more than newspaper headlines." As noted in the Var review, the film was shot in Dublin, "in and around the Ardmore Studios." HR production charts list the production company as Cineman Productions, although screen credits and reviews only list it as D.R.M. D.R.M. Productions and Raymond Stross are listed as the producers on reviews and onscreen. D.R.M. Productions was owned by Robert Mitchum.
       Although his name does not appear in other sources, a Feb 1959 HR news item reported that Richard Collins collaborated on the screenplay with Robert Wright Campbell. Collins' contribution to the screenplay has not been determined. Although a Feb 1959 HR news item reported that negotiations to cast Dana Wynter were taking place, and an Aug 1959 HR news item stated that director Tay Garnett "was tagging" famed Irish playwright Brendan Behan for a role, neither Wynter nor Behan appeared in the film. Although his appearance in the film has not been confirmed, an Aug 1959 HR news item reported that Stross also cast Robert Briscoe, Lord Mayor of Dublin, in the film. According to modern sources, Briscoe was the first Jew to be elected Lord Mayor. He was re-elected in 1961. Briscoe previously had been a gunrunner for the Irish Republican Army during Ireland’s War of Independence.
       According to a Sep 1959 HR news item, the film was completed at $40,000 under budget. Shortly after the film was produced Stross married actress Anne Heywood, who portrayed "Neeve" in the film. Modern sources add T. P. McKenna, and Gerry Sullivan to the cast.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Sep 1960.
---
Daily Variety
14 Sep 60
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Sep 60
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 1959
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1959
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1959
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 1959
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1959
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1959
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1959
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 60
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1960.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Sep 60
p. 845.
New York Times
15 Dec 60
p. 59.
Variety
18 May 1960.
---
Variety
14 Sep 60
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
2d unit photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const supv
COSTUMES
Ward supv
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd ed
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel A Terrible Beauty by Arthur J. Roth (New York, 1958).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
A Terrible Beauty
Release Date:
September 1960
Production Date:
13 July--late August 1959 at Ardmore Studios, Ireland
Copyright Claimant:
Cineman Productions
Copyright Date:
7 August 1960
Copyright Number:
LP17295
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85 or 88-90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19571
SYNOPSIS

In 1941, in Northern Ireland, the Irish Republican Army has collaborated with the Nazis, hoping to liberate the province's six counties from the British. When a Nazi-trained IRA organizer comes to the town of Duncrana, the generally peace-loving Dermot O'Neill, who is influenced by his father's stories of the 1916 Easter Rebellion, naïvely pledges an oath of allegiance, at the prodding of his lifelong friend, Sean Reilly, and the bitter leader of the local group, Don McGinnis, a clubfooted young man who wants to be a hero. Dermot's enthusiasm is at first undiminished by the misgivings of his fiancée Neeve Donnelly, his quietly astute friend, shoemaker Jimmy Hannafin, and most of all his family, but he soon begins to question the moral justification of the organization. While raiding a hydro-electric plant, one man is killed and Sean is wounded. Dermot carries Sean to safety, but while his friend attempts to get home, he is captured and sent to jail. Although McGinnis refuses to raid the jail to rescue Sean, he instead arranges to raid a neighboring police barracks, which would endanger an innocent woman and her child. Dermot's disapproval of the raid leads to his break with the organization and he turns informer. In revenge, the IRA attempts to kill him, but Dermot is rescued by his brother Neil, Jimmy, and Neeve, and he and Neeve escape to Liverpool. ... +


In 1941, in Northern Ireland, the Irish Republican Army has collaborated with the Nazis, hoping to liberate the province's six counties from the British. When a Nazi-trained IRA organizer comes to the town of Duncrana, the generally peace-loving Dermot O'Neill, who is influenced by his father's stories of the 1916 Easter Rebellion, naïvely pledges an oath of allegiance, at the prodding of his lifelong friend, Sean Reilly, and the bitter leader of the local group, Don McGinnis, a clubfooted young man who wants to be a hero. Dermot's enthusiasm is at first undiminished by the misgivings of his fiancée Neeve Donnelly, his quietly astute friend, shoemaker Jimmy Hannafin, and most of all his family, but he soon begins to question the moral justification of the organization. While raiding a hydro-electric plant, one man is killed and Sean is wounded. Dermot carries Sean to safety, but while his friend attempts to get home, he is captured and sent to jail. Although McGinnis refuses to raid the jail to rescue Sean, he instead arranges to raid a neighboring police barracks, which would endanger an innocent woman and her child. Dermot's disapproval of the raid leads to his break with the organization and he turns informer. In revenge, the IRA attempts to kill him, but Dermot is rescued by his brother Neil, Jimmy, and Neeve, and he and Neeve escape to Liverpool.



+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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