Private Property (1960)

79-80 mins | Drama | April 1960

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HISTORY

       No print of this film could be located. The above information was gleaned from contemporary reviews, news items and press materials. Although the Har review cites the film’s title as Private Property! , no other source included the exclamation point. Private Property was the first film for producer Stanley Colbert and writer-director Leslie Stevens. The partners had previously written the stage play The Marriage-Go-Round , which Stevens wrote and produced for Twentieth Century-Fox later in 1960. Kate Manx was Stevens' wife.
       According to several reviews, Private Property was produced for only $59,000 and was shot mainly at Stevens' home in Los Angeles. Before its release, the film was denied a Production Code seal and given a "C," or condemned, rating by the National Catholic Legion of Decency for “highly suggestive sequences, dialogue and music.” However, as noted in a 17 Feb 1960 HR news item, the New York State Board of Censors passed the picture without edits.
       Press materials refer to Stevens as an "American New Wave" director, in reference to the French New Wave filmmakers who were earning acclaim at the time. A publicity line called the film “The most cussed and discussed film of our generation.” Many reviews stated that although Private Property 's subject matter was prurient, the filmmaking was excellent. Although Stevens was hailed as a rising young talent, he made only two more feature ... More Less

       No print of this film could be located. The above information was gleaned from contemporary reviews, news items and press materials. Although the Har review cites the film’s title as Private Property! , no other source included the exclamation point. Private Property was the first film for producer Stanley Colbert and writer-director Leslie Stevens. The partners had previously written the stage play The Marriage-Go-Round , which Stevens wrote and produced for Twentieth Century-Fox later in 1960. Kate Manx was Stevens' wife.
       According to several reviews, Private Property was produced for only $59,000 and was shot mainly at Stevens' home in Los Angeles. Before its release, the film was denied a Production Code seal and given a "C," or condemned, rating by the National Catholic Legion of Decency for “highly suggestive sequences, dialogue and music.” However, as noted in a 17 Feb 1960 HR news item, the New York State Board of Censors passed the picture without edits.
       Press materials refer to Stevens as an "American New Wave" director, in reference to the French New Wave filmmakers who were earning acclaim at the time. A publicity line called the film “The most cussed and discussed film of our generation.” Many reviews stated that although Private Property 's subject matter was prurient, the filmmaking was excellent. Although Stevens was hailed as a rising young talent, he made only two more feature films.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Aug 60
pp. 486-87, 500-502.
Box Office
11 Apr 1960.
---
Daily Variety
8 Apr 60
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Apr 60
p. 6.
Filmfacts
27 May 1960
pp. 97-99.
Harrison's Reports
30 Apr 1960
p. 72.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 1959
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1959
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1959
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 1960
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1960
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 60
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Apr 60
p. 675.
New York Times
25 Apr 60
p. 40.
Variety
13 Apr 60
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
DETAILS
Release Date:
April 1960
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 April 1960
Production Date:
began early July 1959
Copyright Claimant:
Kana Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 July 1959
Copyright Number:
LP17715
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79-80
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Southern California, handsome beatnik Duke and his young friend Boots terrorize a gas station attendant and then hitch a ride with salesman Ed Hogate. When Ed stops at a service station, the boys spot pretty Ann Carlyle. Duke, who guesses that Boots is homosexual, decides to seduce Ann in order to let the naïve Boots have his way with her. Holding Ed at knifepoint, Duke demands he follow Ann’s car to her neighborhood, where the two young men break into the empty house next door. Upon discerning that Ann's husband Roger ignores her, Duke poses as a gardener in order to gain access to Ann's daily life. He soon befriends her and, after convincing her to invite Boots over, plies her with alcohol. The lonely, drunken Ann responds to Duke's sexual overtures, after which he carries her to the neighbor’s bed for Boots to ravish. Boots, however, cannot go through with the act and races out of the house, where a furious Duke punches him. The two fall into the pool, fighting, and during the brawl Duke stabs Boots to death. Just then, Roger returns home and fights Duke. Roger has almost lost the fight when Ann appears with a gun drawn. She shoots Duke three times, killing ... +


In Southern California, handsome beatnik Duke and his young friend Boots terrorize a gas station attendant and then hitch a ride with salesman Ed Hogate. When Ed stops at a service station, the boys spot pretty Ann Carlyle. Duke, who guesses that Boots is homosexual, decides to seduce Ann in order to let the naïve Boots have his way with her. Holding Ed at knifepoint, Duke demands he follow Ann’s car to her neighborhood, where the two young men break into the empty house next door. Upon discerning that Ann's husband Roger ignores her, Duke poses as a gardener in order to gain access to Ann's daily life. He soon befriends her and, after convincing her to invite Boots over, plies her with alcohol. The lonely, drunken Ann responds to Duke's sexual overtures, after which he carries her to the neighbor’s bed for Boots to ravish. Boots, however, cannot go through with the act and races out of the house, where a furious Duke punches him. The two fall into the pool, fighting, and during the brawl Duke stabs Boots to death. Just then, Roger returns home and fights Duke. Roger has almost lost the fight when Ann appears with a gun drawn. She shoots Duke three times, killing him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.