Raymie (1960)

72 mins | Adventure | 15 May 1960

Director:

Frank McDonald

Writer:

Mark Hanna

Producer:

A. C. Lyles

Cinematographer:

Henry Cronjager

Editor:

George White

Production Company:

C.E. Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

This film's working title was Raymie and the Barracuda . According to a 10 Aug 1959 HR article, producer A.C. Lyles attempted to cast President Eisenhower's grandson David for the for the lead role of "Raymie Boston," but the boy's father, Maj. John Eisenhower, rejected the idea. The opening title states: "Filmed at California State Beach and Paradise Cove, ... More Less

This film's working title was Raymie and the Barracuda . According to a 10 Aug 1959 HR article, producer A.C. Lyles attempted to cast President Eisenhower's grandson David for the for the lead role of "Raymie Boston," but the boy's father, Maj. John Eisenhower, rejected the idea. The opening title states: "Filmed at California State Beach and Paradise Cove, California." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
9 May 1960.
---
Daily Variety
11 Nov 1959.
---
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1960
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1959
p. 2, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 1959
p. 3, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Aug 1959
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1960
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 1960.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 May 1960
p. 684.
Variety
4 May 1960
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An A. C. Lyles Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Const supv
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Dial coach
Tech adv
Prod secy
SOURCES
SONGS
"Raymie," music and lyrics by Ronald Stein, sung by Jerry Lewis.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Raymie and the Barracuda
Release Date:
15 May 1960
Production Date:
began 24 August 1959
Copyright Claimant:
C.E. Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 March 1960
Copyright Number:
LP15610
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in feet):
6,457
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19469
SYNOPSIS

On a Southern California pier, nine-year-old Raymie Boston watches as three fishermen lose their catches to Old Moe, a giant barracuda. The men suggest that whoever catches Old Moe will become an important figure on the pier, prompting Raymie to announce to the pier’s manager, Mr. Garber, that he intends to catch the fish. After being warned to be careful by his mother Helen, a Korean War widow who works as a waitress at the pier’s café, Raymie sets off to find sand crabs which he trades with Garber for a stronger fishing line. One of the fishermen, Rex Koontz, a cantankerous old man, is always complaining that Raymie gets in his way and tries to persuade Garber to ban him from the pier, but Ike Burrows, who has dated Helen, is impressed by the lad and encourages him to keep fishing. A pleasant old-timer, R. J. Parsons, gives Raymie tips on how to catch corbina to use as bait to land the barracuda, but warns him that Old Moe may just be a legend. One day while watching the men attempt to reel in a shark, Raymie falls into the ocean. After Ike dives in and saves him, Raymie asks Ike not to mention the incident to Helen. A few days later, at the café, Ike invites Helen on a second date but she is hesitant and wonders why he spends so much time at the pier. Although Ike explains that he works as a foreman for a construction company and that work is slow, Helen pleasantly declines his invitation. Later, Parsons tells Ike that Helen is interested only in a relationship with a steady, responsible man. The ... +


On a Southern California pier, nine-year-old Raymie Boston watches as three fishermen lose their catches to Old Moe, a giant barracuda. The men suggest that whoever catches Old Moe will become an important figure on the pier, prompting Raymie to announce to the pier’s manager, Mr. Garber, that he intends to catch the fish. After being warned to be careful by his mother Helen, a Korean War widow who works as a waitress at the pier’s café, Raymie sets off to find sand crabs which he trades with Garber for a stronger fishing line. One of the fishermen, Rex Koontz, a cantankerous old man, is always complaining that Raymie gets in his way and tries to persuade Garber to ban him from the pier, but Ike Burrows, who has dated Helen, is impressed by the lad and encourages him to keep fishing. A pleasant old-timer, R. J. Parsons, gives Raymie tips on how to catch corbina to use as bait to land the barracuda, but warns him that Old Moe may just be a legend. One day while watching the men attempt to reel in a shark, Raymie falls into the ocean. After Ike dives in and saves him, Raymie asks Ike not to mention the incident to Helen. A few days later, at the café, Ike invites Helen on a second date but she is hesitant and wonders why he spends so much time at the pier. Although Ike explains that he works as a foreman for a construction company and that work is slow, Helen pleasantly declines his invitation. Later, Parsons tells Ike that Helen is interested only in a relationship with a steady, responsible man. The next day, Koontz offers to trade a corbina he has caught for Raymie’s knife, but Raymie refuses, as the knife was his father’s. Parsons then decides to help Raymie by trying to catch corbina with his expensive rod and line but suffers a heart attack in the process. After Raymie learns that Parsons has been giving his catch to Ransom, a café worker, to sell, Raymie promises to deliver Old Moe to him. When Raymie visits Parsons, the old man tells him that he is no longer well enough to fish and gives him all of his fishing tackle as a token of their friendship. However, Raymie has no luck in catching corbina and finally is forced to trade his knife for the fish. Later, when Raymie accidentally slaps Koontz in the face with a fish while swinging his rod, Koontz asks Garber to ban the boy from the pier. Alerted that Raymie is going to try to catch Old Moe that day, Parsons arrives in a wheelchair to watch and Raymie hugs him. Just after Garber arrives and tells Raymie that he will have to leave, Old Moe rises to Raymie’s bait. Ike and the others help Raymie as he struggles to reel in the six-foot-long fish. Raymie suddenly feels sad, and realizing that Old Moe has become a friend, no longer wants him destroyed. As the fish weakens and Garber is about to shoot it, Raymie disrupts his aim, then uses Ike’s knife to cut the line, thereby setting Old Moe free. The men, including Koontz and Garber, begin to understand Raymie’s gesture and Ike makes Raymie a present of his knife. Helen then asks Ike for a date.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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