Halls of Montezuma (1951)

112-113 mins | Drama | January 1951

Full page view
HISTORY

The opening credits of this film include the following written dedication: "To the United States Marine Corps--This story is dedicated in gratitude for its help in making it possible--But most of all for its stalwart defense of all we hold dear to our lives, our people, and our future." According to studio publicity, producer Robert Bassler and studio production head Darryl F. Zanuck found the "key" to the film's plot in a Marine short subject film entitled Objective--Prisoners , in which the importance of taking prisoners for intelligence purposes was demonstrated. Although the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, contains treatments for the film written by Harry Kleiner, Sy Bartlett and technical advisor Maj. George Gilliland, their work was not used in the final film. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, also located at UCLA, Kleiner and Bartlett "wrote an 'original treatment'--based on 'nothing' in which to utilize actual combat film--which the Marines offered us--of the invasion of certain Islands."
       The legal files also note that second-unit footage of Marine Corps manuevers, filmed on location at Camp Pendleton, near Oceanside, CA, was shot between 1 May and 12 May 1950. Studio publicity announced that shortly after the scenes of their manuevers were shot, the Marine and Naval units involved were sent into combat in Korea. According to a 27 Jan 1949 LAT news item, Dana Andrews, Anne Baxter and Paul Douglas were originally set to star in the picture. Halls of Montezuma marked the screen debut of actor Richard Boone. Although studio publicity claimed that the picture also marked the debut of ... More Less

The opening credits of this film include the following written dedication: "To the United States Marine Corps--This story is dedicated in gratitude for its help in making it possible--But most of all for its stalwart defense of all we hold dear to our lives, our people, and our future." According to studio publicity, producer Robert Bassler and studio production head Darryl F. Zanuck found the "key" to the film's plot in a Marine short subject film entitled Objective--Prisoners , in which the importance of taking prisoners for intelligence purposes was demonstrated. Although the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library, contains treatments for the film written by Harry Kleiner, Sy Bartlett and technical advisor Maj. George Gilliland, their work was not used in the final film. According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, also located at UCLA, Kleiner and Bartlett "wrote an 'original treatment'--based on 'nothing' in which to utilize actual combat film--which the Marines offered us--of the invasion of certain Islands."
       The legal files also note that second-unit footage of Marine Corps manuevers, filmed on location at Camp Pendleton, near Oceanside, CA, was shot between 1 May and 12 May 1950. Studio publicity announced that shortly after the scenes of their manuevers were shot, the Marine and Naval units involved were sent into combat in Korea. According to a 27 Jan 1949 LAT news item, Dana Andrews, Anne Baxter and Paul Douglas were originally set to star in the picture. Halls of Montezuma marked the screen debut of actor Richard Boone. Although studio publicity claimed that the picture also marked the debut of Robert Wagner, he had previously appeared in the 1950 M-G-M production The Happy Years .
       HR news items noted that proceeds from the film's premieres in New York and Los Angeles benefitted Marine Corps charities, and that both premieres were attended by Marine officials and veterans. The studio worked closely with the Corps to use the film for recruitment, and an 11 Jan 1951 HR news item noted that a full company of Marine recruits were to be sworn in at the film's San Francisco premiere. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Dec 1950.
---
Cue
26 Aug 1950.
---
Daily Variety
11 Dec 50
p. 1, 14
Film Daily
11 Dec 1950.
---
Hollywood Citizen-News
6 Jan 1951.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 50
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 50
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 50
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1950.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 50
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Dec 50
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 51
p. 3, 8
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jan 51
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 51
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 51
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
27 Jan 1949.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Dec 50
p. 613.
New York Times
6 Jan 51
p. 9.
New York Times
21 Jan 1951.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Walter "Jack" Palance
Jerry H. Fujikawa
Robert Board
George Offerman
Joe Turkel
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward dir
MUSIC
Mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Japanese dial coach for Reginald Gardiner
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
MUSIC
"America," music by Henry Carey
"Semper fidelis" by John Phillip Sousa.
SONGS
"The Marines' Hymn," music based on a theme from the opera Geneviève de Brabant by Jacques Offenbach, lyrics anonymous.
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1951
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Los Angeles and New York: 4 January 1951
Production Date:
18 May--mid July 1950
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
5 January 1951
Copyright Number:
LP895
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
112-113
Length(in feet):
10,177
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
11626
SYNOPSIS

During World War II, a Marine battalion prepares to land on a large Japanese-held island in the South Pacific. Lt. Col. Gilfillan warns the men that it will be a tough mission, and that they have been ordered to take prisoners in order to gain information about the Japanese fortifications. Below deck, Lt. Carl A. Anderson, a chemistry teacher in civilian life, questions his former student, Corp. Stuart Conroy, who complains that he is ill and cannot fight. Knowing that Conroy is just frightened and battle weary, Anderson assures him that he has shown courage before and can do so again. Anderson and Conroy then join the rest of the men, and during the journey in the landing boat, medic C. E. "Doc" Jones recalls an incident a few months earlier when Anderson revealed that he was suffering from "psychological migraines." Although Doc urged Anderson to seek treatment in the United States, Anderson refused to leave his men and has been relying on Doc to supply him with painkillers. The men hit the beach and successfully dig in, despite an initial burst of resistance. As four days pass, Anderson's squad, which includes boxer Pigeon Lane, Sgt. Zelenko, Pvt. Slattery, Coffman, Pvt. Whitney and the unstable Pretty Boy, grows weary of the constant moving and hidden Japanese snipers. One day, the men try to take a ridge of hills, but are beaten back by Japanese rockets, much to the surprise of the commanding officers, who were unaware that rockets were in the enemy's arsenal. Coffman is killed during the battle, and the furious Anderson is forced to take some of Doc's pills. ... +


During World War II, a Marine battalion prepares to land on a large Japanese-held island in the South Pacific. Lt. Col. Gilfillan warns the men that it will be a tough mission, and that they have been ordered to take prisoners in order to gain information about the Japanese fortifications. Below deck, Lt. Carl A. Anderson, a chemistry teacher in civilian life, questions his former student, Corp. Stuart Conroy, who complains that he is ill and cannot fight. Knowing that Conroy is just frightened and battle weary, Anderson assures him that he has shown courage before and can do so again. Anderson and Conroy then join the rest of the men, and during the journey in the landing boat, medic C. E. "Doc" Jones recalls an incident a few months earlier when Anderson revealed that he was suffering from "psychological migraines." Although Doc urged Anderson to seek treatment in the United States, Anderson refused to leave his men and has been relying on Doc to supply him with painkillers. The men hit the beach and successfully dig in, despite an initial burst of resistance. As four days pass, Anderson's squad, which includes boxer Pigeon Lane, Sgt. Zelenko, Pvt. Slattery, Coffman, Pvt. Whitney and the unstable Pretty Boy, grows weary of the constant moving and hidden Japanese snipers. One day, the men try to take a ridge of hills, but are beaten back by Japanese rockets, much to the surprise of the commanding officers, who were unaware that rockets were in the enemy's arsenal. Coffman is killed during the battle, and the furious Anderson is forced to take some of Doc's pills. At the Army's island headquarters, Anderson meets with other officers as Gilfillan recounts the troubles they are having capturing prisoners and getting information from them. Sgt. Randolph Johnson, an unconventional soldier who specializes in tricking Japanese prisoners into talking, questions one prisoner, who has been dubbed Willie. As Gilfillan receives orders to stop the rockets within nine hours, before the next assault on the hills, Willie informs Johnson that the Japanese soldiers holding a cave stronghold are willing to surrender. Accompanied by Johnson and war correspondent Sgt. Dickerman, Anderson leads a patrol to the cave, but upon their arrival, they are ambushed and Zelenko is blinded. The men capture the remaining Japanese, including an officer named Capt. Ishio Makino, soldiers Romeo and Nomura and a shell-shocked, elderly civilian. Anderson finds a map on one of the dead officers, then leads the men across a river and through the jungle. After a sniper shoots at him, Pretty Boy kills the man during hand-to-hand combat, but the confrontation further unbalances him and he attempts to murder the prisoners. Lane then accidentally shoots and kills Pretty Boy while attempting to hold him off. Later, the wounded Doc tries to tell Dickerman how inherently good Anderson is despite his bitterness. Doc gives Dickerman his notebook, in which he has written a message for Anderson, then dies. Anderson and the remaining men return to headquarters, where Makino commits hara-kiri with a knife he had stolen from Johnson. While map expert Lt. Butterfield works on a Japanese map overlay found by Pretty Boy, Anderson and Johnson learn that Nomura is actually an important leader named Maj. Kenji Matsuoda. Johnson finally deduces where the rockets are located, and a barrage begins as Anderson rejoins his men outside. As they prepare, Anderson learns that Conroy has been killed by a sniper. With only Lane, Whitney and Slattery left of his squad, Anderson takes the news hard and is ready to give up. Dickerman reads aloud Doc's note, however, and Anderson, inspired by Doc's appeal for him to be strong for the sake of those whom he survives, throws away his painkillers and leads his men into battle. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.