All the Young Men (1960)

86-87 mins | Drama | September 1960

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HISTORY

The film's working title was All the Fine Young Men . The opening cast credits differ from the end credits: In the opening credits, Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier are listed first, above the title, and are followed by James Darren, Glen Corbett and the others. Ingemar Johansson is listed last in the opening credits. Onscreen credits note that exterior scenes were filmed at Montana's Glacier National Park through courtesy of the Dept. of the Interior.
       According to news items and an article about the production in AmCin , a crew of seventy traveled to St. Mary's, MT, an Eastern gateway to Glacier National Park, seventeen miles from the Canadian border, but because of warm weather, fog, blizzard conditions and a gale that destroyed the Korean farmhouse set, filming was continued on a Hollywood sound stage covered with silicate to simulate snow. Later, the company moved to Mt. Hood, OR, where the weather caused further problems. The scene in which two Marines set fire to a tank was shot in a parking lot at a lodge to avoid having ski lifts appear in the frame. Because of delays, shooting was not completed until 54 days after it began, although the original schedule called for 28 days.
       According to news items, the start date of the production was determined by Sidney Poitier's schedule in the Broadway play A Raisin in the Sun ; Poitier left the role to be in the film, then returned to the play following shooting. Although Hall Bartlett's onscreen credit reads "written, produced and directed by Hall Bartlett," a Mar 1959 HR news item noted that the ... More Less

The film's working title was All the Fine Young Men . The opening cast credits differ from the end credits: In the opening credits, Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier are listed first, above the title, and are followed by James Darren, Glen Corbett and the others. Ingemar Johansson is listed last in the opening credits. Onscreen credits note that exterior scenes were filmed at Montana's Glacier National Park through courtesy of the Dept. of the Interior.
       According to news items and an article about the production in AmCin , a crew of seventy traveled to St. Mary's, MT, an Eastern gateway to Glacier National Park, seventeen miles from the Canadian border, but because of warm weather, fog, blizzard conditions and a gale that destroyed the Korean farmhouse set, filming was continued on a Hollywood sound stage covered with silicate to simulate snow. Later, the company moved to Mt. Hood, OR, where the weather caused further problems. The scene in which two Marines set fire to a tank was shot in a parking lot at a lodge to avoid having ski lifts appear in the frame. Because of delays, shooting was not completed until 54 days after it began, although the original schedule called for 28 days.
       According to news items, the start date of the production was determined by Sidney Poitier's schedule in the Broadway play A Raisin in the Sun ; Poitier left the role to be in the film, then returned to the play following shooting. Although Hall Bartlett's onscreen credit reads "written, produced and directed by Hall Bartlett," a Mar 1959 HR news item noted that the original story was to be written by Bartlett and Gene Coon. Coon's contribution to the story has not been verified, however. The news item added that Bartlett initially planned to produce the picture in partnership with John Champion, but later decided to make it as a solo venture. Jaguar Productions, Inc. was Alan Ladd's company, and Ladd Enterprises, Inc. was a co-copyright claimant. According to a DV news item, Jeffrey Hunter was sought for the co-starring role, and Stuart Whitman was also considered for a role, possibly for the same part. All the Young Men marked the screen debut and only American film role of Swedish world heavyweight boxing champion Ingemar Johansson.
       According to a HR news item, topical comedian Mort Sahl's contract had "the unusual stipulation that Sahl write all his own dialogue....[Bartlett] handed Sahl the story outline and told him to put in his own words for his role." The HR review noted, "Sahl's monologue on some of life's incongruities is deftly inserted and brightly played."
       According to the AmCin article, director of photography Daniel Fapp "violated a theory of exposure long held by most photographers" and opened up one stop above the exposure indicated on his light meter when he shot snow scenes, rather than decreasing exposure one stop. Fapp also shot so as to use the sun's light as a cross-light or back-light, rather than the key source, for which he used arc booster lights. Fapp shot night sequences "day-for-night."
       According to letters in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the PCA advised Bartlett and Columbia officials to drop the word "nigger" from the script; however, in the final film, the character "Bracken" uses the word in a verbal attack on "Towler." Many reviews commented that the picture presented a non-stereotypical portrayal of a black man. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Sep 60
pp. 550-51, 568-70.
Box Office
8 Aug 1960.
---
Cue
27 Aug 1960.
---
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1959.
---
Daily Variety
4 Aug 60
p. 3.
Film Daily
4 Aug 60
p. 7.
Filmfacts
1960
p. 215-216.
Harrison's Reports
13 Aug 60
p. 131.
Hollywood Citizen-News
8 Sep 1960.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Mar 1959.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 1959.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 60
p. 3.
Life
14 Dec 1959.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
8 Nov 59
p. 7, 11.
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1959.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Sep 1960.
---
Motion Picture Daily
3 Aug 1960.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Aug 60
p. 796.
New York Times
27 Aug 60
p. 8.
Saturday Review
20 Aug 1960.
---
The Exhibitor
3 Aug 60
p. 4725.
Time
29 Aug 1960.
---
Variety
3 Aug 60
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
Asst cam
Head grip
2d grip
Gaffer
Still photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
2d prop man
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd supv
Mike man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Mr. Ladd's makeup
Hair styles
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Scr supv
Loc representative
Dial coach
Unit pub
SOURCES
SONGS
"All the Young Men," music by George Duning, lyrics by Stanley Styne.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
All the Fine Young Men
Release Date:
September 1960
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 26 August 1960
Los Angeles opening: 7 September 1960
Production Date:
10 October--12 December 1959
Copyright Claimant:
Hall Bartlett Productions, Inc. & Ladd Enterprises, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 August 1960
Copyright Number:
LP17509
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
86-87
Length(in feet):
7,740
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19625
SYNOPSIS

In October 1950, shortly after U.S. forces invade Korea, an advance Marine unit is sent to find and hold a farmhouse that is situated in a strategic mountain pass. As the Marines make their way down a snow-covered mountainside, they are attacked by waiting Chinese troops. Just before he dies, Lt. Earl D. Toland orders Sgt. Eddie Towler, the unit's only black man, to take charge of the few surviving Marines, even though Towler suggests that Sgt. Kincaid, a veteran who has been with the outfit for eleven years, is better prepared to direct the unit. Towler guides the men across the slippery, heavily mined slopes, and during the trek, Kincaid rescues one of the men when he slips and lands among the mines. As they reach the farmhouse, one of the men panics and throws a grenade inside the courtyard walls, seriously injuring a Korean woman who lives there with her part-French daughter and grandson. Once inside, the men begin to worry that the numerous Chinese troops in the area will kill them all before the advancing Marine battalion can reach them, but Towler orders the men to hold their position at all costs. Bracken, a Southern bigot, claims that black men are unsuited to be leaders. Kincaid, who thinks the men should be moved even though it would mean losing the pass to the enemy and thereby endangering their entire battalion, suggests that Towler wants to remain in the farmhouse merely to prove himself. Determined to carry out Toland's commands, Towler claims that he will kill any man who refuses to act like a Marine and defend the farmhouse. That night, ... +


In October 1950, shortly after U.S. forces invade Korea, an advance Marine unit is sent to find and hold a farmhouse that is situated in a strategic mountain pass. As the Marines make their way down a snow-covered mountainside, they are attacked by waiting Chinese troops. Just before he dies, Lt. Earl D. Toland orders Sgt. Eddie Towler, the unit's only black man, to take charge of the few surviving Marines, even though Towler suggests that Sgt. Kincaid, a veteran who has been with the outfit for eleven years, is better prepared to direct the unit. Towler guides the men across the slippery, heavily mined slopes, and during the trek, Kincaid rescues one of the men when he slips and lands among the mines. As they reach the farmhouse, one of the men panics and throws a grenade inside the courtyard walls, seriously injuring a Korean woman who lives there with her part-French daughter and grandson. Once inside, the men begin to worry that the numerous Chinese troops in the area will kill them all before the advancing Marine battalion can reach them, but Towler orders the men to hold their position at all costs. Bracken, a Southern bigot, claims that black men are unsuited to be leaders. Kincaid, who thinks the men should be moved even though it would mean losing the pass to the enemy and thereby endangering their entire battalion, suggests that Towler wants to remain in the farmhouse merely to prove himself. Determined to carry out Toland's commands, Towler claims that he will kill any man who refuses to act like a Marine and defend the farmhouse. That night, as Towler contemplates their difficult situation, the men reminisce about home. A recent immigrant from Sweden named Torgil, who wants to become a citizen and bring his family to the U.S., sings a song from his native land. Crane, a cynical corporal, tells amusingly irreverent stories about high-ranking officers, and a young soldier named Cotton sings and accompanies himself on a Korean stringed instrument. Before long, an enemy patrol unit advances on the house and the shooting begins. The Marines repulse these troops, and Hunter, a Navajo from Arizona nicknamed "The Chief," volunteers to scout the area for other enemy soldiers. The Chinese capture Hunter and accompany him back to the farmhouse. To save his unit, Hunter refrains from giving the password and dies with his Chinese captors when Towler and Kincaid fire on the intruders. After Hunter's burial, the Eurasian woman living in the house thanks Towler for helping her, telling him that one day, his color will make no difference to the others. Bracken gets drunk and attacks the woman, whereupon Towler fights him and, after enduring Bracken's racist insults and epithets, threatens to kill him if he touches the woman again. After another battle with Chinese troops that costs the life of one of the men, Towler and Kincaid come to blows, but their fight is interrupted by the sound of an approaching tank. Towler and Kincaid sneak onto the tank and set it ablaze, but Kincaid's leg is crushed as he tries to get out of the way, and it must be amputated by the medic, who is unsure of his ability. Encouraged by Towler, the medic continues with the operation, and Towler donates his own blood to keep Kincaid alive despite Bracken's objections. As a line of Chinese tanks approaches, Towler orders the Marines to safer ground and protects Kincaid during an explosion, then carries him out of the farmhouse. The enemy is about to reach the two men when U.S. planes appear overhead and blast the Chinese troops. Greatly relieved, Towler and Kincaid wish each other a merry Christmas. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.