Japanese War Bride (1952)

90-91 mins | Drama | January 1952

Director:

King Vidor

Producer:

Joseph Bernhard

Cinematographer:

Lionel Lindon

Editor:

Terry Morse

Production Designer:

Charles D. Hall

Production Company:

Bernhard Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was East Is East . As noted in May 1951 HR news item, popular Japanese actress Shirley Yamaguchi, who made her American film debut in Japanese War Bride , initially encountered difficulties obtaining permission to enter the country to work on the film. In late May the State Department issued her a thirteen-week work permit. HR production charts list the actress as Yoshiko Yamaguchi, and note that portions of the picture were filmed in Salinas, CA. According to a Jun 1952 HR news item, a $75,000 plagiarism suit was filed against Twentieth Century-Fox, Bernhard Productions, and writers Anson Bond and Catherine Turney in May 1952 by Harold Nebenzal, who alleged that the story of the film was "lifted" from a treatment that he had submitted to Bernhard, through Bond, in 1949. The outcome of the suit is not ... More Less

The working title of this film was East Is East . As noted in May 1951 HR news item, popular Japanese actress Shirley Yamaguchi, who made her American film debut in Japanese War Bride , initially encountered difficulties obtaining permission to enter the country to work on the film. In late May the State Department issued her a thirteen-week work permit. HR production charts list the actress as Yoshiko Yamaguchi, and note that portions of the picture were filmed in Salinas, CA. According to a Jun 1952 HR news item, a $75,000 plagiarism suit was filed against Twentieth Century-Fox, Bernhard Productions, and writers Anson Bond and Catherine Turney in May 1952 by Harold Nebenzal, who alleged that the story of the film was "lifted" from a treatment that he had submitted to Bernhard, through Bond, in 1949. The outcome of the suit is not known. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
12 Jan 1952.
---
Daily Variety
19 Nov 1951.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jan 52
p. 3.
Film Daily
21 Jan 52
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 51
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 51
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 51
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 51
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 52
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 52
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
12 Jan 52
pp. 1185-86.
New York Times
30 Jan 52
p. 22.
Variety
9 Jan 52
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Loc photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prods
Prod mgr
Comptroller
Casting dir
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
East Is East
Release Date:
January 1952
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 29 January 1952
Production Date:
5 June--early July 1951 at Motion Picture Center
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 January 1952
Copyright Number:
LP1482
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90-91
Length(in feet):
8,194
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
14517
SYNOPSIS

Critically wounded while fighting in the Korean War, young American Army lieutenant Jim Sterling is transported to a Japanese hospital, where he is nursed back to health by a Japanese nurse named Tae Shimizu. Tae and Jim fall in love, and Jim later visits her grandfather Eitaro and asks him to bless their marriage. Eitaro objects to the marriage because he feels that there are too many differences between the Anglos and the Japanese. Hoping to scare Jim off, Eitaro plays a trick on him, but Jim and Tae see through the ploy and insist on going through with the marriage. With his new bride at his side, Jim returns to his home in Salinas, California, and introduces her to his parents, his brothers, Art and Ted, and Art's wife Fran. Fran, who still carries a torch for Jim, becomes jealous of Tae. A short time later, Tae meets the Hasagawas, a second generation Japanese American family who own the land next to the Sterlings'. While trying hard to gain acceptance by the Sterlings, Tae falls victim to Fran's plots to discredit her. One day, Tae overhears Mrs. Sterling's friend, Milly Shafer, tell Mrs. Sterling that she is uneasy about Tae's presence because her son was killed in the war. Although Milly's remarks upset her, Tae decides to remain silent about the affair. The following day, while Tae and Ted are out picking mushrooms, Tae has a talk with Shiro Hasagawa, who tells her that his family was sent to an internment camp during World War II, and that the memory of the camp has embittered his ... +


Critically wounded while fighting in the Korean War, young American Army lieutenant Jim Sterling is transported to a Japanese hospital, where he is nursed back to health by a Japanese nurse named Tae Shimizu. Tae and Jim fall in love, and Jim later visits her grandfather Eitaro and asks him to bless their marriage. Eitaro objects to the marriage because he feels that there are too many differences between the Anglos and the Japanese. Hoping to scare Jim off, Eitaro plays a trick on him, but Jim and Tae see through the ploy and insist on going through with the marriage. With his new bride at his side, Jim returns to his home in Salinas, California, and introduces her to his parents, his brothers, Art and Ted, and Art's wife Fran. Fran, who still carries a torch for Jim, becomes jealous of Tae. A short time later, Tae meets the Hasagawas, a second generation Japanese American family who own the land next to the Sterlings'. While trying hard to gain acceptance by the Sterlings, Tae falls victim to Fran's plots to discredit her. One day, Tae overhears Mrs. Sterling's friend, Milly Shafer, tell Mrs. Sterling that she is uneasy about Tae's presence because her son was killed in the war. Although Milly's remarks upset her, Tae decides to remain silent about the affair. The following day, while Tae and Ted are out picking mushrooms, Tae has a talk with Shiro Hasagawa, who tells her that his family was sent to an internment camp during World War II, and that the memory of the camp has embittered his father and made him resent all Anglo Americans. Later, Fran, still trying to make trouble for Tae, spreads word that she was seen alone with Shiro. Tae finds herself at the center of attention once again when, at a party, Jim's drunken friend, Woody Blacker, insults her by calling her a "geisha." Jim punches Woody, and a fistfight ensues. Time passes, and Tae, now pregnant, looks forward to starting a family in the house they plan to build on Sterling land. Soon after Tae gives birth to a baby boy, her troubles return when an anonymous and malicious letter is circulated through town claiming that the father of the child is Shiro. The accusations upset Jim, who makes plans to leave Salinas after telling Tae about the letter. Tae, however, is so devastated by the false accusations that she takes the baby and leaves without Jim. While Tae takes refuge at the Hasagawas, who later send her to live with relatives in Monterey, Jim concludes that Fran wrote the slanderous letter. Jim wrings a confession from Fran, after which Art strikes her. Jim then convinces Shiro that he is genuinely in love with Tae and that he wants to repair his marriage. As soon as Shiro tells him where he can find his wife, Jim sets out for Monterey. Tae tries to run away from Jim when she first sees him, and then contemplates jumping into the ocean from a nearby cliff. Jim prevents her from doing so, however, when he tells her that he truly loves her and is ready to start a new life in their new house. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.