For Pete's Sake (1974)

PG | 90 mins | Comedy | 26 June 1974

Director:

Peter Yates

Cinematographer:

Laszlo Kovacs

Editor:

Frank P. Keller

Production Designer:

Gene Callahan

Production Companies:

Columbia Pictures, Rastar Pictures, Inc, Barclay Associates
Full page view
HISTORY

According to director Peter Yates in his DVD commentary for the film, Barbra Streisand wanted to make a comedy in which she did not sing on-camera, as she had in her previous films, but the producers could not resist having Streisand sing the title song over the animated credits for the film. Producer Martin Erlichman was Streisand's manager.
       The 1 Aug 1973 HR carried an announcement that Streisand had been signed to star in July Pork Bellies, with principal photography set to begin in Brooklyn, NY, late Sep 1973. The 21 Sep 1973 HR noted that production would get underway on 24 Sep 1973, and that the title had been changed to For Pete's Sake. The schedule contemplated three weeks of location shooting in New York before taking up residence in Los Angeles, CA, for another five weeks of production. The 11 Dec 1973 HR reported that principal photography had been completed at The Burbank Studio [the former Warner Bros. lot] "following nine weeks of shooting" and stated that there had been two weeks of shooting "on location with the principals in New York City."
       The 24 Dec 1973 Var reported that the film would receive "heavy advance promotion" by means of a two-minute teaser trailer that would be shown at every venue where Streisand's starring film The Way We Were (1973, see entry) would be screening.
       An item in the 12 Mar 1974 HR noted that For the Love of Pete was now the film's title, but the 8 Apr 1974 DV ... More Less

According to director Peter Yates in his DVD commentary for the film, Barbra Streisand wanted to make a comedy in which she did not sing on-camera, as she had in her previous films, but the producers could not resist having Streisand sing the title song over the animated credits for the film. Producer Martin Erlichman was Streisand's manager.
       The 1 Aug 1973 HR carried an announcement that Streisand had been signed to star in July Pork Bellies, with principal photography set to begin in Brooklyn, NY, late Sep 1973. The 21 Sep 1973 HR noted that production would get underway on 24 Sep 1973, and that the title had been changed to For Pete's Sake. The schedule contemplated three weeks of location shooting in New York before taking up residence in Los Angeles, CA, for another five weeks of production. The 11 Dec 1973 HR reported that principal photography had been completed at The Burbank Studio [the former Warner Bros. lot] "following nine weeks of shooting" and stated that there had been two weeks of shooting "on location with the principals in New York City."
       The 24 Dec 1973 Var reported that the film would receive "heavy advance promotion" by means of a two-minute teaser trailer that would be shown at every venue where Streisand's starring film The Way We Were (1973, see entry) would be screening.
       An item in the 12 Mar 1974 HR noted that For the Love of Pete was now the film's title, but the 8 Apr 1974 DV carried an item stating that For Pete's Sake had been selected for the final release title.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Jul 1974
p. 4704.
Daily Variety
12 Nov 1973
---
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1974.
---
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1974
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1973
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1973
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1973
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 1973
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1973
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 1974
pp. 3-4.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
28 Jun 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Jun 1974
Section IV, p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Jul 1974
p. 13.
New York Times
27 Jun 1974
p. 54.
New Yorker
8 Jul 1974
pp. 50-51.
Newsweek
8 Jul 1974
p. 69.
Time
15 Jul 1974
p. 89.
Variety
24 Dec 1973
---
Variety
26 Jun 1974
p. 22.
Variety
11 Jul 1974
p. 73.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Peter Yates Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Best boy
Extra elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
2d prop man
Const coord
Set dresser
Painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ladies ward
Men`s ward
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles des by
MAKEUP
Miss Streisand's hairstyles des by
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Buddy the Dog trained by
Livestock handled by
Bull trained by
Addl casting
Scr supv
Unit pub
Asst to prod
Prod secy
Auditor
Loc auditor
Transportation co-capt
Craft service
First aid
Travel and loc coord
Loc mgr
Operations
Screening coord
SOURCES
SONGS
"For Pete's Sake (Don't Let Him Down)," composed by Artie Butler, lyrics by Mark Lindsay, sung by Barbra Streisand.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
July Pork Bellies
For the Love of Pete
Release Date:
26 June 1974
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles openings: 26 June 1974
Production Date:
24 September--early December 1973 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Rastar Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 June 1974
Copyright Number:
LP43931
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision equipment
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
23947
SYNOPSIS

Henry and Pete Robbins are a young Brooklyn, New York, couple who can barely make ends meet, though they do manage to have a housekeeper, Loretta, who comes in one day a week for four hours. Pete works as a cab driver and Henry as a phone solicitor. When Pete's better-off brother, Fred, and sister-in-law, Helen, come to dinner, they urge Pete to resume his college education full-time so that he can earn more in the future. When Helen's constant petty insults finally get to her, Henry tells off Helen, abruptly bringing the evening to an end. Afterwards, Henry offers to go back to working full time so that Pete can return to college, but he won't hear of it. Pete mentions that Nick Kasabian, his dispatcher at the cab company, made a bundle of money investing in futures. Nick has a cousin in the State Department who passes along tips about world situations. The Russians are short of meat, and the dispatcher is investing in pork bellies. Pete dreams that if they could invest three thousand dollars they would stand to make a fortune in just a few months. The only trouble is they don't have the three thousand. Henry and Pete attempt to borrow the money from a loan company, but are turned down. Henry then suggests that Pete borrow the money from his brother, but they are again turned down. Henry then asks Bernie, her apartment building supervisor, if he knows someone who might give them a short-term loan. Bernie takes Henry to a loan shark who gives her the money at twenty percent ... +


Henry and Pete Robbins are a young Brooklyn, New York, couple who can barely make ends meet, though they do manage to have a housekeeper, Loretta, who comes in one day a week for four hours. Pete works as a cab driver and Henry as a phone solicitor. When Pete's better-off brother, Fred, and sister-in-law, Helen, come to dinner, they urge Pete to resume his college education full-time so that he can earn more in the future. When Helen's constant petty insults finally get to her, Henry tells off Helen, abruptly bringing the evening to an end. Afterwards, Henry offers to go back to working full time so that Pete can return to college, but he won't hear of it. Pete mentions that Nick Kasabian, his dispatcher at the cab company, made a bundle of money investing in futures. Nick has a cousin in the State Department who passes along tips about world situations. The Russians are short of meat, and the dispatcher is investing in pork bellies. Pete dreams that if they could invest three thousand dollars they would stand to make a fortune in just a few months. The only trouble is they don't have the three thousand. Henry and Pete attempt to borrow the money from a loan company, but are turned down. Henry then suggests that Pete borrow the money from his brother, but they are again turned down. Henry then asks Bernie, her apartment building supervisor, if he knows someone who might give them a short-term loan. Bernie takes Henry to a loan shark who gives her the money at twenty percent interest--per week! Henry tells Pete she borrowed the money from her cousin. At a futures broker's office a week later, Henry is concerned that pork bellies have not gone up, but Pete assures her they will when the deal with the Russians goes through. Nick assures the couple that he is never wrong and the investment will pay off. When Henry meets with the loan shark to explain that she does not have the thirty-six hundred dollars, he responds that the figure is now four thousand because she's late, and due tomorrow or she's dead. Later, Pete is nearly run down by a determined driver as he walks home from work, and Henry receives a phone call with a blunt message: "We get the money tomorrow, or next time the car won't miss." Henry asks Bernie for advice. He suggests that she get Mrs. Cherry to buy her contract. But Mrs. Cherry is a madam, and Henry would have to work off her debt by entertaining gentleman callers. Henry tells Bernie to call Mrs. Cherry, who turns out to be a tiny, middle-aged Jewish grandmother type. Henry’s debt is now five thousand dollars. When Henry protests, Mrs. Cherry replies, "I saved your husband's life–that's not worth a thousand?" She gives Henry a code name, "Tiger 7," and a phone number she is to call every morning after her husband has left for work. The next morning, Henry pushes Pete out the door and prepares to meet her clients. The first man suggests they play "take a nap," in which Henry will pretend to take a nap, he will sneak in on her, and she will pretend to struggle–but not too hard. However, when he enters her bedroom, Henry screams and flails her arms, hitting the man in the nose. He leaves with his head tilted back, cotton stuffed in his nostrils, and an ice pack held to his face. The second client is a judge, who arrives in a cab driven by Pete. He asks Pete to wait for twenty minutes while he goes inside. The judge wants to play "honeymoon in the kitchen," with Henry wearing only a lacy apron while she pretends to cook and he "arrives home early" to surprise her. As the judge enters the kitchen, Pete pops into the apartment to go to the bathroom. Henry manages to put Pete off the scent, but he accidentally picks up the judge's suit coat as he goes into the bedroom. Henry hides the judge in the coat closet, then retrieves his coat, but as she opens the closet door, the judge falls face first to the floor--apparently dead. Just as she manages to get the judge's body back into the closet, Loretta arrives and tries to hang her coat in the closet. At the same moment Pete walks in with a pair of glasses he found on the bed. Henry tells him the glasses are hers, and Loretta manages to keep the body hidden from Pete. Henry and Loretta push Pete out the door, and Henry calls Mrs. Cherry to report on the judge's condition. As Pete waits for his fare to return downstairs, Bernie packs the judge's body in a trunk. However, before he can remove the trunk, Pete returns to the apartment. Although curious about what's in the trunk, Pete helps Bernie down to the street with it, where Pete returns to his cab and Bernie turns the body over to Mrs. Cherry, who has arrived in a custom-outfitted flower delivery truck that doubles as an emergency ambulance. When Pete's cab won't start, he looks under the hood. Mrs. Cherry manages to revive the judge, and hustle him into the back seat of the cab without Pete noticing. Late at night Pete wakes up to see Henry sitting up in a rocking chair. When he goes to her, she panics and starts telling him off. Thinking that she is upset because she wants to repay her cousin, Pete suggests they sell the pork belly futures, but Henry insists he hold on to them. The next day, Henry learns from Mrs. Cherry that her contract has been sold to Anglo and Dominic of the Speed Wrecking Company, and now owes them six thousand dollars. To pay it off she will be a "drop, carrying and delivering packages for five hundred dollars per drop. The first contact she is supposed to meet is apprehended by plainclothes cops, and the woman's identity is assumed by one of the officers. When Henry makes the drop, the cop pulls off his disguise and attempts to arrest her, but she runs away. Henry brings the package back to Angelo and Dominic, who run when they see it. She follows, but they tell her there's a bomb in the package. She tosses it away, but destroys Dominic and Angelo's wrecking yard office in the resulting explosion. The two sell her contract to take her on a ride to an isolated cabin and turn her over to a rifle-wielding cattle rustler for seven thousand dollars. The man tells Henry all she has to do is drive a motor home loaded with cattle into the city twice a day for two weeks to pay off her debt. In the city, a drunk driver crashes into the motor home, and the cattle escape. Driving around in his cab looking for a fare, Pete receives a radio call from Nick, telling him that pork bellies are going through the roof and Pete is now a rich man. As Pete drives along he is confronted with a herd of cattle in his path. He swerves to avoid hitting them and smashes into a fire hydrant. Henry chases the cattle through the streets of New York. Meanwhile, in a movie theater, as the cattle stampede from How the West Was Won is on screen, the stray cattle burst through the screen and run through the theater. The animals wreak havoc at a sidewalk cafe, disrupt traffic, and charge through an expensive crystal and glassware store. Henry follows them into the store only to find they've gone out the back door. Miraculously, nothing is broken--but when Henry 'knocks wood' over the store's good fortune, dozens of chandeliers crash to the floor. Outside, as Henry asks a workman if he has seen any cows go by, she finds herself on a construction lift being carried into the air. A pursuing cop grabs on, and when the platform collapses, Henry and the cop find themselves on the back of the bull riding down the street. The cop tells Henry she's under arrest. With Henry in Jail, Pete feels he deserves an explanation. As Henry blurts out the truth about cattle rustlers, the gangsters and the madam, Pete storms out. Later, Henry sits in the apartment waiting to say good-bye to Pete, if he should ever come home, as Fred and Helen pace. Pete comes in, gives Henry a new turquoise ring, and makes up with her. When Helen asks how Pete can forgive Henry, Pete responds, "I hope you never need money, Fred. Helen couldn't make fifty cents for you." Pete's insulted relatives storm out. Henry reminds Pete that she still owes Rocky seven thousand dollars, but he tells her that he bought the contract, and she now owes Pete ten thousand. Henry calls her cousin in Texas to try to unload the hot cattle, but the cousin hangs up and Henry and Pete start off toward a new life with the cattle towed behind in a pair of U-Haul trailers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.