We're Going to Be Rich (1938)

78 or 80 mins | Comedy-drama | 8 July 1938

Director:

Monty Banks

Cinematographer:

Mutz Greenbaum

Editor:

James B. Clark

Production Designer:

Oscar Werndorff

Production Company:

New World Pictures, Ltd.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was He Was Her Man . A 29 Jun 1937 HR news item refers to the picture as The Diamond Rush , and a 17 Feb 1938 HR news item stated that Twentieth Century-Fox was going to release the film in the United States as Bother . According to HR news items, Philip Dunne worked on an "original" story for the film, and there was a possibility that George Sanders was going to play the lead opposite Gracie Fields. Dunne's contribution to the completed picture, however, has not been confirmed. HR production charts include William Dewhurst and Jane Carr in the cast, but their participation in the finished film has not been confirmed. A HR news item noted that the entire film was shipped to the United States to be edited. Among the songs sung by Fields and others are: "Walter, Walter," "Will You Love Me When I'm Mutton," "Ee by Gum," "Oh, You Naughty Men" and "Don't 'Ang My 'Arry." The Var review states that "My Only Romance," written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Lew Pollack, is in the film, but its inclusion in the completed picture is doubtful. We're Going to Be Rich was the first film Fields made for Twentieth Century-Fox. In 1940, she married the picture's director, Monty Banks. According to a modern source, Banks played a cellmate of character "Dobbie ... More Less

The working title of this film was He Was Her Man . A 29 Jun 1937 HR news item refers to the picture as The Diamond Rush , and a 17 Feb 1938 HR news item stated that Twentieth Century-Fox was going to release the film in the United States as Bother . According to HR news items, Philip Dunne worked on an "original" story for the film, and there was a possibility that George Sanders was going to play the lead opposite Gracie Fields. Dunne's contribution to the completed picture, however, has not been confirmed. HR production charts include William Dewhurst and Jane Carr in the cast, but their participation in the finished film has not been confirmed. A HR news item noted that the entire film was shipped to the United States to be edited. Among the songs sung by Fields and others are: "Walter, Walter," "Will You Love Me When I'm Mutton," "Ee by Gum," "Oh, You Naughty Men" and "Don't 'Ang My 'Arry." The Var review states that "My Only Romance," written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Lew Pollack, is in the film, but its inclusion in the completed picture is doubtful. We're Going to Be Rich was the first film Fields made for Twentieth Century-Fox. In 1940, she married the picture's director, Monty Banks. According to a modern source, Banks played a cellmate of character "Dobbie Dobson." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Jun 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
7 Jul 38
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 37
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 37
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 37
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 37
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 38
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 38
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
9 Oct 37
p. 59.
Motion Picture Herald
30 Oct 37
p. 73.
Motion Picture Herald
16-Jul-38
---
New York Times
4 Jul 38
p. 10.
Variety
6 Jul 38
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Sweetest Song in the World" and "Trek Song," words and music by Harry Parr-Davies
"There's a Tavern in the Town," anonymous
other songs by Will E. Haines, Jim Harper, Noel Forrester, Greatrex Newman, Howard Flynn and Ralph Butler.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Bother
The Diamond Rush
He Was Her Man
Release Date:
8 July 1938
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 2 July 1938
Production Date:
late October--mid December 1937 at Denham Studios, England
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 July 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8158
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78 or 80
Length(in feet):
7,194
Length(in reels):
8
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
4107
SYNOPSIS

In the late 1880's, music hall singer Kit Dobson, who is known as the Lancashire Lark, gives her final performance in Melbourne, Australia and prepares to return to her native England with her husband "Dobbie" and nephew Tim. Once they are on the ship, however, Dobbie, who has always been a bit careless with his wife's money, reveals that he has bought a half-interest in a gold mine in Johannesburg, South Africa, for which they are now destined. Kit is furious and becomes even more so upon discovering that Dobbie has been swindled. Never one to chat when he can use his fists, Dobbie battles with the men at the mine office and is arrested. After Dobbie is sentenced to six weeks in jail, the self-reliant Kit gets a job in a saloon owned by Yankee Gordon despite interference from Yankee's paramour and current singer, Pearl. Pearl swears that she will get revenge when Yankee fires her in favor of Kit, but all goes well for the next few weeks as Yankee's saloon does booming business thanks to Kit's singing. Yankee falls in love with Kit, but her thoughts are only of Dobbie, and she joyfully welcomes him when he is released from jail. Dobbie is jealous of Yankee, however, and the couple quarrel. Kit tells Dobbie to take a walk, after which he gets drunk in the saloon where Pearl now works. Seeing her chance to get even with Kit, Pearl takes Dobbie to her flat, where he passes out on the couch. Kit is humiliated when she learns where Dobbie has gone, and when he returns the next morning, she ... +


In the late 1880's, music hall singer Kit Dobson, who is known as the Lancashire Lark, gives her final performance in Melbourne, Australia and prepares to return to her native England with her husband "Dobbie" and nephew Tim. Once they are on the ship, however, Dobbie, who has always been a bit careless with his wife's money, reveals that he has bought a half-interest in a gold mine in Johannesburg, South Africa, for which they are now destined. Kit is furious and becomes even more so upon discovering that Dobbie has been swindled. Never one to chat when he can use his fists, Dobbie battles with the men at the mine office and is arrested. After Dobbie is sentenced to six weeks in jail, the self-reliant Kit gets a job in a saloon owned by Yankee Gordon despite interference from Yankee's paramour and current singer, Pearl. Pearl swears that she will get revenge when Yankee fires her in favor of Kit, but all goes well for the next few weeks as Yankee's saloon does booming business thanks to Kit's singing. Yankee falls in love with Kit, but her thoughts are only of Dobbie, and she joyfully welcomes him when he is released from jail. Dobbie is jealous of Yankee, however, and the couple quarrel. Kit tells Dobbie to take a walk, after which he gets drunk in the saloon where Pearl now works. Seeing her chance to get even with Kit, Pearl takes Dobbie to her flat, where he passes out on the couch. Kit is humiliated when she learns where Dobbie has gone, and when he returns the next morning, she tells him that their marriage is over. Dobbie miserably removes himself to Blue Drift, a nearby mining town, and quickly becomes a disreputable drunk. Tim, who visits Dobbie, lies to Kit and tells her that he has struck it rich. Believing that Dobbie no longer needs her, Kit agrees to go away with Yankee, but is prevented from doing so when Tim runs away to join Dobbie. Meanwhile, Dobbie gets into a fight with the Kimberley Kid, a noted bareknuckle boxer, and after Dobbie bests him, the Kid's manager, Broderick, hires Dobbie to be his new fighter. When Dobbie appears at Yankee's saloon to boast of his good fortune, the two men fight, and Yankee arranges for Dobbie to fight the Capetown Killer, who promises Yankee that he will make it a bloody match. Kit is put off by Dobbie's arrogant behavior, and she bets everything she has on the Killer. Distraught, Dobbie decides to forfeit the match so that Kit will not lose her money. The crowd turns violent when Dobbie does not appear, and in order to prevent them from lynching Dobbie, Kit convinces him to fight. The Killer makes short work of Dobbie, and Yankee's employee Jake compliments Yankee on his matchmaking skills when it becomes apparent that Kit is overwhelmed with sympathy for Dobbie and will return to him, as Yankee intended. The audience rushes from the saloon when news comes of a huge gold strike, and Kit tells the injured Dobbie about the strike. He insists that they go to England as she had intended, but after he recovers, Kit and Tim take Dobbie to the mining town, where Kit explains that as long as his adventuresome spirit is satisfied, so is she. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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