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The following written acknowledgment appears in the onscreen credits: "Our thanks to the Texas Film Commmission, and in particular to Warren Skaaren, Executive Director, for his cooperation in the making of this film." An Aug 1971 HR news item stated that Peter Bogdanovich was to direct The Getaway which was to be released by Paramount. A Nov 1971 DV article noted that Paramount had withdrawn from negotiations to produce and distribute the film and National General had taken over the release. By Dec 1971, HR reported that Sam Peckinpah was the film's director. Actor Steve McQueen and Peckinpah had worked together in 1971 on the Cinerama production of Junior Bonner . The Getaway marked the first project for McQueen as part of First Artists, a company formed by actors Paul Newman, Barbra Streisand, Sidney Poitier and McQueen.
       According to Filmfacts , Jack Palance was intially cast in the film but was replaced by Al Lettieri prior to production. The article also added that Jerry Fielding had composed the film's original score, which was discarded by McQueen, who then commissioned Quincy Jones for a new score. Filmfacts added that later reports indicated that McQueen had had the film re-edited and that Peckinpah at some point threatened to have his name removed from the credits. Gordon T. Dawson's credits read "Associate Producer and 2d Unit Director." Although onscreen credits list John Bryson's character as "The Accountant," and "Jack Beynon" introduces him to "Doc McCoy" as his brother, Bryson's character is never called by name. In the same scene when Doc arrives, ... More Less

The following written acknowledgment appears in the onscreen credits: "Our thanks to the Texas Film Commmission, and in particular to Warren Skaaren, Executive Director, for his cooperation in the making of this film." An Aug 1971 HR news item stated that Peter Bogdanovich was to direct The Getaway which was to be released by Paramount. A Nov 1971 DV article noted that Paramount had withdrawn from negotiations to produce and distribute the film and National General had taken over the release. By Dec 1971, HR reported that Sam Peckinpah was the film's director. Actor Steve McQueen and Peckinpah had worked together in 1971 on the Cinerama production of Junior Bonner . The Getaway marked the first project for McQueen as part of First Artists, a company formed by actors Paul Newman, Barbra Streisand, Sidney Poitier and McQueen.
       According to Filmfacts , Jack Palance was intially cast in the film but was replaced by Al Lettieri prior to production. The article also added that Jerry Fielding had composed the film's original score, which was discarded by McQueen, who then commissioned Quincy Jones for a new score. Filmfacts added that later reports indicated that McQueen had had the film re-edited and that Peckinpah at some point threatened to have his name removed from the credits. Gordon T. Dawson's credits read "Associate Producer and 2d Unit Director." Although onscreen credits list John Bryson's character as "The Accountant," and "Jack Beynon" introduces him to "Doc McCoy" as his brother, Bryson's character is never called by name. In the same scene when Doc arrives, a henchmen alerts Beynon by calling "Claude," but no one has that name in the film. Jim Thompson's source novel was set in the 1940s, and, according to Filmfacts , the film initially was to be set in the 1940s as well. The Getaway was shot on location at Huntsville prison, San Marcos, San Antonio and El Paso, TX. Modern sources as Hal Smith and Tommy Splittgerber to the cast.
       As recounted in numerous contemporary and modern sources, during filming of The Getaway , McQueen became romantically involved with co-star Ali MacGraw, who was married to producer and Paramount chief-of-production Robert Evans. McQueen's fifteen-year marriage to actress Neile Adams had been strained for some time and six weeks into the production, their divorce became final. MacGraw divorced Evans by the end of 1972 and in Aug 1973 married McQueen. MacGraw did not make another film until 1978 after her marriage with McQueen ended. In 1994, a remake of The Getaway , co-written by Walter Hill, was produced by Universal Pictures, starring then husband-and-wife Alec Baldwin and Kim Bassinger, directed by Roger Donaldson. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Dec 1972
p. 4549.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1971.
---
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1971.
---
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1972.
---
Filmfacts
1972
pp. 627-30.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Aug 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1972
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 1972
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 1972
p. 3.
Life
11 Aug 1972
pp. 47-50.
Los Angeles Times
18 Dec 1972
Section IV, p. 1, 23.
New York Times
20 Dec 1972
p. 53.
New Yorker
23 Dec 1972
p. 55.
Time
8 Jan 1973
pp. 53-54.
Variety
5 Apr 1972.
---
Variety
14 Aug 1972.
---
Variety
13 Dec 1972
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Sam Peckinpah Film
A Sam Peckinpah Film; A Solar/Foster-Brower Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Dial dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Ed consultant
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Men's cost
Women's cost
MUSIC
Mus ed
Harmonica solos
Musical voices
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles by
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
Prod secy
Scr supv
Casting dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Getaway by Jim Thompson (New York, 1959).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1972
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 December 1972
Production Date:
23 February--12 May 1972 in Texas
Copyright Claimants:
National General Pictures Corporation The First Artists Production Company, Ltd., Solar Productions, Inc. David Foster Productions & Tatiana Films, Inc.
Copyright Dates:
30 September 1972 30 September 1972 30 September 1972
Copyright Numbers:
LP42785 LP42785 LP42785
Physical Properties:
Sound
Todd-AO
Color
Technicolor
Lenses/Prints
prints by Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
122
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Four years into a ten-year prison term in Texas, convicted armed robber Carter “Doc” McCoy applies for parole and, despite good behavior, is rejected. When Doc’s wife, Carol, next visits, he directs her to advise corrupt but influential parole board member Jack Beynon that he is “for sale.” Soon, in an unusual reversal, Doc’s parole request is granted. After a nervous but highly anticipated reunion with Carol, Doc meets Beynon who explains that in exchange for his freedom he must rob a small local bank of over half a million dollars with the assistance of Beynon’s chosen henchmen, Rudy Butler and Frank Jackson. After staking out the bank for several days to determine its routines and security measures, Doc goes over detailed plans for the robbery with Butler and Jackson, who are dismissive of Doc’s complex arrangements. On the day of the heist, while Butler and Jackson arrive near the bank as planned, Carol covers for Doc, allowing him to sneak into an underground tunnel where he cuts the power to the bank and the surrounding block. While Carol drives away to set up diversionary bombs, Doc meets the others inside the bank. All goes well until the bank guard attempts to reach for his gun and a panicky Jackson shoots him. Butler and Jackson make their escape and Carol returns for Doc. Angered by Jackson’s action, Butler kills him and tosses his body at a corner not far from the bank, then drives on to meet Doc and Carol. At the designated meeting place, Butler admits to killing Jackson and when he attempts to shoot Carol ... +


Four years into a ten-year prison term in Texas, convicted armed robber Carter “Doc” McCoy applies for parole and, despite good behavior, is rejected. When Doc’s wife, Carol, next visits, he directs her to advise corrupt but influential parole board member Jack Beynon that he is “for sale.” Soon, in an unusual reversal, Doc’s parole request is granted. After a nervous but highly anticipated reunion with Carol, Doc meets Beynon who explains that in exchange for his freedom he must rob a small local bank of over half a million dollars with the assistance of Beynon’s chosen henchmen, Rudy Butler and Frank Jackson. After staking out the bank for several days to determine its routines and security measures, Doc goes over detailed plans for the robbery with Butler and Jackson, who are dismissive of Doc’s complex arrangements. On the day of the heist, while Butler and Jackson arrive near the bank as planned, Carol covers for Doc, allowing him to sneak into an underground tunnel where he cuts the power to the bank and the surrounding block. While Carol drives away to set up diversionary bombs, Doc meets the others inside the bank. All goes well until the bank guard attempts to reach for his gun and a panicky Jackson shoots him. Butler and Jackson make their escape and Carol returns for Doc. Angered by Jackson’s action, Butler kills him and tosses his body at a corner not far from the bank, then drives on to meet Doc and Carol. At the designated meeting place, Butler admits to killing Jackson and when he attempts to shoot Carol and Doc, Doc shoots him several times. Doc and Carol switch cars and, taking the money, head off to meet Beynon, unaware that the wounded Butler, who was wearing a bullet proof vest, is following. As they near the place they are to meet Beynon, Carol grows increasingly anxious, so Doc leaves her in the car while he takes the money to Beynon, who is displeased with the murders. When Doc asks why there is only half a million dollars from the robbery, when radio broadcasts noted that over $750,000 was stolen, Beynon admits that his brother, who sits on the bank board, had taken two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to cover business debts and the robbery was intended as a cover for the earlier theft. Beynon then mocks Doc for not understanding that Carol had sex with Beynon to ensure Doc’s release. Carol, who has quietly entered the room behind Doc, stuns her husband by abruptly shooting and killing Beynon from over Doc’s shoulder. Meanwhile, a dazed Butler stops at an isolated veterinary hospital where he forces Dr. Harold Clinton to tend to his wounds. That evening, Butler demands that Clinton and his pliant wife Fran drive him in pursuit of the McCoys. After fleeing Beynon’s, Doc stops the car and furiously berates Carol for not telling him the truth, but she reminds him that he sent her to Beynon. Although still angered, Doc continues with the getaway plan to reach El Paso where he has arranged visas to enter Mexico. When Beynon’s brother is unable to contact him, he and several henchman investigate and, discovering the dead body, set out to El Paso as well. At a train station, Carol takes the money to a locker where a young man assists her with the heavy bag. Afterward, when Carol meets with Doc and takes him to the locker, they find it is empty and Doc realizes the helpful man has stolen it. Spotting the man boarding the train to El Paso, Doc chases him on board while Carol waits uncertainly on the platform. When the thief discovers the bag contains money, he gleefully takes his seat with it, but moments later Doc arrives and knocks him unconscious, then gets off the train at the next stop with the bag. Some time later, Doc returns to the train station where Carol is waiting. Despite Carol’s genuine happiness at seeing him, Doc coldly suggests they split the money and go their separate ways. Hurt and angered, Carol declares she does not want to break up with Doc and the couple return to their car in sullen silence. That night on the road, Butler and the Clintons stop at a motel where Butler takes perverse delight in tying Clinton up and forcing him to watch while he and Fran enthusiastically have sex. The next day, as Doc and Carol continue their journey, Carol tells her brooding husband that he must trust someone someday or he will have nothing. Peeved when the car radio breaks down, Doc insists they stop at the next town, but at the electronics store, the salesman recognizes Doc from the numerous televised police announcements and telephones the police. Doc hurries to a sporting goods store where he demands a double-barrel shotgun and ammunition and when the police arrive, he forces them to lie in the street while he shoots up their car. Doc and Carol then race out of town, but upon seeing a bus heading toward town, the couple speedily abandon the car, then innocuously catch the bus as the police and sheriff race past it. In the next town, Carol buys a used car and the couple return to the road. That evening at a drive-in, however, a carhop waitress recognizes Doc and notifies the authorities. When the police arrive, there is a shootout as Carol frantically tries to drive the couple out of the parking lot. Forced to abandon the car in town, Doc and Carol dart into an alley and take refuge in a full garbage bin, still carrying the money bag and shotgun. Although they evade the police, the McCoys cannot avoid a trash truck that deposits them and the garbage into the back of the truck. When Doc realizes the truck compacts the garbage, he and Carol hastily place numerous heavy objects around themselves as protection. At dawn, the truck dumps its full load of trash, including Doc and Carol, into a garbage landfill. After extricating themselves, the money bag and shotgun, Doc struggles to tell Carol he has realized they should stay together, but, still resentful over Doc’s earlier anger, Carol remains doubtful. Doc vows never to mention Beynon again and Carol agrees they should continue together. The next morning, Butler is nonplussed to discover that the distraught and humiliated Clinton has committed suicide. He and Fran then continue to the El Paso hotel where Beynon had arranged travel documents with manager Laughlin. After Butler demands Laughlin inform him when Doc and Carol arrive, Laughlin telephones Beynon’s brother who is waiting nearby. Later, when a now cleaned up Doc and Carol arrive, Laughlin dutifully informs Butler. Using the hapless Fran to pose as a room service attendant, Butler tries to get into the McCoys’ room, but Doc sneaks up behind them and knocks them both out. When Doc and Carol attempt to slip out of the hotel, they run into Beynon’s brother and his henchman and a wild shootout ensues in which Doc kills the gang with the shotgun. As Doc and Carol flee out of a back fire escape, a revived Butler attempts to follow, but Doc shoots him too. Flagging down an aging cowboy in a pick-up, Doc and Carol ask him to drive them across the border. Discovering the couple is married, the old man agrees. In Mexico, the old man cheerfully accepts thirty thousand dollars for the truck and Doc and Carol drive away together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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