The Limit (1972)

PG | 90 mins | Drama | June 1972

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HISTORY

The working title of this unviewed film was Speed Limit 65. The Limit marked the only producing, writing and directing credit for star Yaphet Kotto. The Box review noted that Kotto was heavily involved with production company New Era Communications, which it described as an “organization formed to help minority workers in the entertainment field.” The Limit was the company’s only production. According to Filmfacts, The Limit was shot in and around Los Angeles. HR production charts add Gus Peters, Robert Rockwell and Son Hooker to the cast. Modern sources add David Louis Hirschman, Shayle Israel Hirschman, Susan Andrea Hirschman and Dirty Denny to the cast. ...

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The working title of this unviewed film was Speed Limit 65. The Limit marked the only producing, writing and directing credit for star Yaphet Kotto. The Box review noted that Kotto was heavily involved with production company New Era Communications, which it described as an “organization formed to help minority workers in the entertainment field.” The Limit was the company’s only production. According to Filmfacts, The Limit was shot in and around Los Angeles. HR production charts add Gus Peters, Robert Rockwell and Son Hooker to the cast. Modern sources add David Louis Hirschman, Shayle Israel Hirschman, Susan Andrea Hirschman and Dirty Denny to the cast.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Dec 1972
p. 4549
Cue
25 Nov 1972
---
Filmfacts
1972
pp. 584-85
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 1971
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1972
---
New York Times
11 Nov 1972
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Cost
Cost
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
STAND INS
Action coord
Action coord
SOURCES
SONGS
"Take Me Girl, I'm Ready," words and music by Johnny William Bristol, Gloria R. Jones and Pamela Joan Sawyer, sung by Junior Walker and the All Stars; "My Kind of Summer," composer undetermined, sung by Gladys Joseph.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Speed Limit: 65
Release Date:
June 1972
Production Date:
Sep 1971
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, black motorcycle police officer Mark Johnson patrols gang-infested neighborhoods with his white partner and best friend, Jeff McMillan. One afternoon, Mark has a run-in with a gang known as The Virgins, whose leader, Big Donnie, is taken aback by the policeman's understanding, dignified demeanor despite the gang's constant derision. When Mark advises Donnie not to continue to allow his heavily pregnant girl friend, Judy, to ride a motorbike, the gang leader agrees. Later, after Donnie actively seeks Mark out for advice, the Virgins' second-in-command, Kenny, reacts with outrage. In retaliation he tracks Mark down, but not finding the policeman at home, angrily beats up Mark's girl friend Margret instead. Kenny then goes to Donnie's house and after convincing Judy to ride with him, purposely causes an accident, hoping to injure her. After learning of the attack on Margret, Mark searches for Kenny and the two men confront each other after a wild cycle chase. Although Kenny succeeds in slashing Mark's throat, the policeman overpowers the biker and takes him into custody before being rushed to a hospital where doctors save his life, allowing him to return to patrolling the ...

More Less

In Los Angeles, black motorcycle police officer Mark Johnson patrols gang-infested neighborhoods with his white partner and best friend, Jeff McMillan. One afternoon, Mark has a run-in with a gang known as The Virgins, whose leader, Big Donnie, is taken aback by the policeman's understanding, dignified demeanor despite the gang's constant derision. When Mark advises Donnie not to continue to allow his heavily pregnant girl friend, Judy, to ride a motorbike, the gang leader agrees. Later, after Donnie actively seeks Mark out for advice, the Virgins' second-in-command, Kenny, reacts with outrage. In retaliation he tracks Mark down, but not finding the policeman at home, angrily beats up Mark's girl friend Margret instead. Kenny then goes to Donnie's house and after convincing Judy to ride with him, purposely causes an accident, hoping to injure her. After learning of the attack on Margret, Mark searches for Kenny and the two men confront each other after a wild cycle chase. Although Kenny succeeds in slashing Mark's throat, the policeman overpowers the biker and takes him into custody before being rushed to a hospital where doctors save his life, allowing him to return to patrolling the streets.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.