Living Free (1972)

G | 88-92 mins | Drama | April 1972

Director:

Jack Couffer

Writer:

Dalton Trumbo

Producer:

Paul Radin

Cinematographer:

Wolfgang Suschitsky

Editor:

Don Deacon

Production Designer:

John Stoll
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HISTORY

The following written epilogue and acknowledgments appear in the onscreen credits: "This is a true story... Photographed entirely on location in East Africa with the kind co-operation of the Kenya National Parks and Game Dept., to whom the makers of the film wish to express their gratitude. The producers are most grateful for help received from His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, the Tanzania National Parks and East African Airways." Actor Shane De Louvre's name was misspelled De Louvres in the opening credits. Living Free was copyrighted twice, once in Jan 1971 and again in Jan 1972. Reviews add Naivasha, Kenya and East Africa as shooting locations. Portions of the film have voice-over narration by Susan Hampshire in the role of “Joy Adamson.”
       A DV Aug 1966 news item indicated that producers Sam Jaffe and Paul Radin had purchased the rights to Living Free and Forever Free , the second and third volumes in an autobiographical trilogy by Joy Adamson. In 1966, first of the series, Born Free , produced by Jaffe and Radin, had been released by Columbia to great acclaim and popularity. That story introduced the adventures of Elsa the lioness and her two siblings, who were tamed as cubs in Kenya by wildlife conservationists Joy and George Adamson, who then returned Elsa to the wild. The Adamsons were played in that film by real-life husband and wife Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers. Although there is no indication that McKenna and Travers would reprise their roles in Living Free , they did appear in a film "inspired" by Born Free ... More Less

The following written epilogue and acknowledgments appear in the onscreen credits: "This is a true story... Photographed entirely on location in East Africa with the kind co-operation of the Kenya National Parks and Game Dept., to whom the makers of the film wish to express their gratitude. The producers are most grateful for help received from His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia, the Tanzania National Parks and East African Airways." Actor Shane De Louvre's name was misspelled De Louvres in the opening credits. Living Free was copyrighted twice, once in Jan 1971 and again in Jan 1972. Reviews add Naivasha, Kenya and East Africa as shooting locations. Portions of the film have voice-over narration by Susan Hampshire in the role of “Joy Adamson.”
       A DV Aug 1966 news item indicated that producers Sam Jaffe and Paul Radin had purchased the rights to Living Free and Forever Free , the second and third volumes in an autobiographical trilogy by Joy Adamson. In 1966, first of the series, Born Free , produced by Jaffe and Radin, had been released by Columbia to great acclaim and popularity. That story introduced the adventures of Elsa the lioness and her two siblings, who were tamed as cubs in Kenya by wildlife conservationists Joy and George Adamson, who then returned Elsa to the wild. The Adamsons were played in that film by real-life husband and wife Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers. Although there is no indication that McKenna and Travers would reprise their roles in Living Free , they did appear in a film "inspired" by Born Free , the 1969 British Lion production An Elephant Called Slowly , playing themselves, along with the real George Adamson. That film was directed by James Hill, who also directed Born Free .
       A Jan 1968 HR news item reported that producer Carl Foreman had selected Hill to write and direct Living Free , which was set to begin production in Kenya in 1969. Geoffrey Keen, who played "John Kendall" and Peter Lukoye, who played "Nuru," were the only cast members to reprise their roles from Born Free . Filmfacts noted that although the film took the title of the second book of the series, it is mostly based on the events from the third, Forever Free , which follows the saga of Elsa's cubs and the Adamsons after Elsa’s death. Filmfacts also noted that for the original British release of Living Free the title song was sung by Nina Van Pallandt. When the song did not have the success of the enormously popular theme from Born Free , which was sung by Matt Moore, Columbia had Julie Budd re-record "Living Free" for the American release of the film.
       After the death of Elsa and the release of the cubs Jespah, Gopa and Little Elsa, Adamson adopted a tamed cheetah named Pippa, who was also re-trained to return to the wild and about whom Adamson wrote another book entitled The Spotted Sphinx . For more information on the Adamsons, please see the entry for Born Free . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Jun 1972.
---
Daily Variety
5 Aug 1966.
---
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1966.
---
Filmfacts
1972
pp. 403-05.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 1966.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Dec 1966.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jan 1968.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1971
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 1971
p. 12.
Los Angeles Examiner
21 Jun 1972.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1972.
---
New York Times
13 Jul 1972
p. 29.
Variety
5 Jul 1972
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl wildlife photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATOR
Prop man
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
Dubbing mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Prod supv
Prod secy
Asst prod secy
Wildlife supv
Safari equipment by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book Living Free
The Story of Elsa and Her Cubs (London, 1961) and Forever Free--Elsa's Pride (London, 1962) by Joy Adamson.
AUTHOR
MUSIC
Excerpts from "Born Free" originally composed by John Barry.
SONGS
"Living Free," music and lyrics by Sol Kaplan and Freddy Douglass, sung by Julie Budd.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
April 1972
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 21 June 1972
Production Date:
early January--late March 1971 in Kenya and Twickenham Studios, England
Copyright Claimants:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Dates:
4 January 1971 4 January 1972
Copyright Numbers:
LP40478 LP40476
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Color
Duration(in mins):
88-92
MPAA Rating:
G
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
22874
SYNOPSIS

In Kenya, wildlife conservationists Joy Adamson and her husband George make plans to save lioness Elsa and her cubs from the increasing danger of poachers. As Joy considers where to relocate the lion family, she remembers how she and George became involved with Elsa: Years earlier, Joy and George adopt Elsa and her two sisters as cubs, after senior game warden George is forced to kill their mother when she attacks him. The Adamsons delight in caring for the three energetic cubs, but realized as the animals grow that they can not keep them, and Elsa’s two sisters are eventually sent to a zoo in Holland. Having developed a special relationship with Elsa, however, the Adamsons keep her with them in their camp in the bush until the young adult lioness begins to inadvertently cause havoc in local villages, starting an elephant stampede and terrifying the natives. When George’s boss, Chief Warden John Kendall, insists that they give Elsa up, Joy, who refuses to consider sending the lion to a zoo, convinces George to help her train Elsa to live in the wild and regain her natural instincts. Although suffering many challenges and setbacks over six months, which includes Elsa coming close to death, Joy and George ultimately succeed in returning Elsa to the wild where she finds a mate. In the present, whenever the Adamsons camp in Elsa’s territory she brings her three cubs to visit. On George’s advice, Joy reluctantly refrains from touching the cubs to keep them wild, but does offer them food and treats. Soon the young cubs, whom Joy names Jespah, the most intelligent ... +


In Kenya, wildlife conservationists Joy Adamson and her husband George make plans to save lioness Elsa and her cubs from the increasing danger of poachers. As Joy considers where to relocate the lion family, she remembers how she and George became involved with Elsa: Years earlier, Joy and George adopt Elsa and her two sisters as cubs, after senior game warden George is forced to kill their mother when she attacks him. The Adamsons delight in caring for the three energetic cubs, but realized as the animals grow that they can not keep them, and Elsa’s two sisters are eventually sent to a zoo in Holland. Having developed a special relationship with Elsa, however, the Adamsons keep her with them in their camp in the bush until the young adult lioness begins to inadvertently cause havoc in local villages, starting an elephant stampede and terrifying the natives. When George’s boss, Chief Warden John Kendall, insists that they give Elsa up, Joy, who refuses to consider sending the lion to a zoo, convinces George to help her train Elsa to live in the wild and regain her natural instincts. Although suffering many challenges and setbacks over six months, which includes Elsa coming close to death, Joy and George ultimately succeed in returning Elsa to the wild where she finds a mate. In the present, whenever the Adamsons camp in Elsa’s territory she brings her three cubs to visit. On George’s advice, Joy reluctantly refrains from touching the cubs to keep them wild, but does offer them food and treats. Soon the young cubs, whom Joy names Jespah, the most intelligent and brave, Little Elsa, the only girl and smallest, and Gopa, the Swahili word for timid, become confident near the Adamsons and their houseman Nuru and grow especially fond of cod liver oil. One day when Joy is in Nairobi on business, Elsa seeks out George and collapses. Although George summons Joy, by the time she returns to the bush, Elsa has died from what George suspects was an infection. Upon learning that the cubs have disappeared and there is no sign of the father lion, Joy grows alarmed as the youngsters are too young to feed themselves. Several nights later, when Joy spots the cubs near Elsa’s grave, she excitedly reaches for Jespah only to receive a frightened swat across the hand. As George tends to her wound, he acknowledges that the cubs will need assistance and offers to take a six-week leave-of-absence to help Joy. Initially hopeful about locating the cubs, the Adamsons end up spending George’s entire leave searching in vain for the animals despite leaving out tins of cod liver oil and food. While George returns to work, Joy travels to Tanzania to make inquiries at the Serengeti Wildlife Sanctuary and returns to tell George of her certainty that if they can capture the cubs, the reserve will take them. Over the next several weeks the cubs struggle with the wildlife around them, while Joy and George resume leaving them food, hoping to locate their den. Soon, however, John visits the Adamsons to inform them that the cubs have been reported attacking local goat farms. Feeling guilty for having introduced the young animals to goat meat, George meets with village elders to pay for their losses and plead with them not to attack the hungry cubs. When John returns to tell the Adamsons that simply keeping the cubs away from one particular village is not enough, Joy reveals her plans to transport them to the safety of the Serengeti Sanctuary. Aghast as the park is more than seven hundred miles away, John declares the plan impossible, but agrees to speak to associates at the reserve about the cubs. When George announces his intention to resign to devote all his energy to locating and capturing the cubs, John agrees to allow the couple three months to find them. George’s assistant game keeper, Makedde, offers to leave with George to help the couple. With Makedde’s assistance, George returns to the goat village where the men and elders set up a complex warning system to watch for the cubs and protect the goats. After several more weeks, the Adamsons locate the area where the cubs live and, using food and cod liver oil, lure them away from the village further into the bush. In Nairobi one afternoon, John discovers Joy in the bank covering an overdraft with the couple’s savings and scolds her before revealing that the Serengeti has officially agreed to take the cubs. The Adamsons use the bulk of their savings to purchase a special truck and build special cages for each of the cubs. Over several weeks Joy, George, Makedde and Nuru leave food near and in the cages allowing the cubs to grow used to the contraptions. George and Joy have agreed not to use tranquilizers on the young animals for fear the drug might cause them harm, but are then faced with the challenge of luring all three cubs into the cages simultaneously. One evening, a sudden flash flood nearly wipes out the Adamsons’ camp. Hastening to check on the cages, George and Joy are amazed to find each cub inside a cage, but when George cuts the rope to close the cage doors, the pulley breaks. The noise frightens the cubs who immediately dart away. Exhausted and knowing that the cubs will not return to a suspicious area, the Adamsons move the cages to higher ground and again begin the tedious process of overcoming the cubs’ fear of the cages. With only three days left in their allotted time, Joy is awakened one night by a crash and, running to the cage area, is stunned to find George and Makedde watching all three cubs caught in their respective cages. The group then hurries off to Tanzania with Makedde driving the truck and the Adamsons following in their Rover. After a long and arduous trip across small, unpaved roads, as the trucks enter Tanzania, an errant rock slices the brake line on the truck, sending the large vehicle thundering down a hill. George daringly maneuvers the Rover around and directly in front of the truck to act as a literal brake for the vehicle. After a harrowing descent, both vehicles stop and the cubs are found to be unharmed. Upon arriving happily at the Serengeti, Joy and George prepare to remain in the park to help the cubs adjust to their new surroundings, but are dismayed to learn they will not be allowed. A park warden explains that the reserve provides food for the animals and forbids any human presence there. Although saddened, Joy and George realize that this is best and, after luring the cubs out of their cages with one last tin of cod liver oil, they watch as Jespah, Gopa and Little Elsa scamper out on to the plain, safe and free. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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