Jeremy (1973)

PG | 90 mins | Romance | August 1973

Director:

Arthur Barron

Producer:

George Pappas

Cinematographer:

Paul Goldsmith

Editor:

Zina Voynow

Production Designer:

Peter Bocour

Production Company:

Kenasset Film Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Jeremy marked the feature film debut of actress Glynnis O'Connor and director Arthur Barron, a filmmaking teacher at Columbia University whose primary experience was in television documentaries. The May 1973 Cannes Film Festival jury presented Jeremy and Barron the award for first film of a director. Jeremy was filmed on location in New York City.
       A Jun 1973 Var article noted that a dispute had arisen over the film's authorship and direction. According to the article, Joseph Brooks filed a dispute with distributor United Artists, but the company maintained the dispute was between Brooks and executive producer Elliott Kastner. The article stated that Brooks claimed to have conceived of the project, written most of the script, packaged the film with Kastner financing, cast the film, then directed all but the final week of shooting. According to Brooks, Kastner fired him and replaced him with Barron, who had been an assistant on the film, as Brooks had no previous filmmaking experience. Kastner claimed Barron was contracted as co-writer and co-director, and after Brooks initially fired actor Robby Benson, then later went over budget, Kastner replaced him with Barron. The outcome of the dispute, if any, has not been determined. Brooks received full onscreen credit for writing one of two songs for the film, "The Hourglass Song," performed on the soundtrack by Benson. Although onscreen credits list the song as “The Hourglass Song,” all publicity materials refer to it as “Blue Balloon.” Both titles are registered with ... More Less

Jeremy marked the feature film debut of actress Glynnis O'Connor and director Arthur Barron, a filmmaking teacher at Columbia University whose primary experience was in television documentaries. The May 1973 Cannes Film Festival jury presented Jeremy and Barron the award for first film of a director. Jeremy was filmed on location in New York City.
       A Jun 1973 Var article noted that a dispute had arisen over the film's authorship and direction. According to the article, Joseph Brooks filed a dispute with distributor United Artists, but the company maintained the dispute was between Brooks and executive producer Elliott Kastner. The article stated that Brooks claimed to have conceived of the project, written most of the script, packaged the film with Kastner financing, cast the film, then directed all but the final week of shooting. According to Brooks, Kastner fired him and replaced him with Barron, who had been an assistant on the film, as Brooks had no previous filmmaking experience. Kastner claimed Barron was contracted as co-writer and co-director, and after Brooks initially fired actor Robby Benson, then later went over budget, Kastner replaced him with Barron. The outcome of the dispute, if any, has not been determined. Brooks received full onscreen credit for writing one of two songs for the film, "The Hourglass Song," performed on the soundtrack by Benson. Although onscreen credits list the song as “The Hourglass Song,” all publicity materials refer to it as “Blue Balloon.” Both titles are registered with ASCAP.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Jun 1973.
---
Box Office
13 Aug 1973
p. 4616.
Daily Variety
23 May 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jul 1973.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Sep 1973.
---
New York Times
2 Aug 1973
p. 28.
Newsweek
6 Aug 1973.
---
Time
8 Oct 1973.
---
Variety
23 May 1973
p. 18.
Variety
6 Jun 1973
p. 4, 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Optical cine
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp, cond and arr
Rec eng
Rec at
SOUND
Sd ed
Soundman
Asst soundman
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod consultant
Prod supv
Prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Asst to Elliott Kastner
Asst to the prod
Casting dir
Scr supv
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"Jeremy," music by Lee Holdridge, lyrics by Dorothea Joyce, sung by Glynnis O' Connor
"The Hourglass Song," music and lyrics by Joseph Brooks, sung by Robby Benson.
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1973
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Festival screening: 14 May 1973
New York opening: 1 August 1973
Production Date:
October--November 1972 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 June 1973
Copyright Number:
LP43136
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
23665
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, high school sophomore Jeremy Jones starts his day with his usual habit of stopping at the nearby candy store to study the horseracing forms and select the eventual winner before riding the subway to school. During his private cello lesson, the teacher tells Jeremy that as long as his attention is divided he will never be a great musician, but Jeremy insists that greatness is his goal. When his teacher later frets that he may appear unduly harsh or demanding, Jeremy expresses his appreciation for being challenged. That afternoon, Jeremy and his best friend, Ralph Manzoni, join other students for a game of basketball and a discussion about classes. While doing his homework that night, Jeremy listens to loud music through headphones until his father Ben chastises him, insisting that no one can do two things well at the same time. The next day in music class, Jeremy rehearses with other classmates for an upcoming recital in which he has a major solo. Sent to look for chalk later, Jeremy walks down the hall and, spotting a girl going through ballet movements in an empty dance room, pauses to watch in amazement. When the girl speaks to him, Jeremy is tongue-tied and barely able to make small talk. Later, Jeremy confides in Ralph that he thought the girl was beautiful, but Ralph laughs when Jeremy realizes he never found out her name. After learning that the girl is new student Susan Rollins, the smitten Jeremy goes to his afternoon job as a dog walker, and in Central Park reads poetry to the pack of patient ... +


In New York City, high school sophomore Jeremy Jones starts his day with his usual habit of stopping at the nearby candy store to study the horseracing forms and select the eventual winner before riding the subway to school. During his private cello lesson, the teacher tells Jeremy that as long as his attention is divided he will never be a great musician, but Jeremy insists that greatness is his goal. When his teacher later frets that he may appear unduly harsh or demanding, Jeremy expresses his appreciation for being challenged. That afternoon, Jeremy and his best friend, Ralph Manzoni, join other students for a game of basketball and a discussion about classes. While doing his homework that night, Jeremy listens to loud music through headphones until his father Ben chastises him, insisting that no one can do two things well at the same time. The next day in music class, Jeremy rehearses with other classmates for an upcoming recital in which he has a major solo. Sent to look for chalk later, Jeremy walks down the hall and, spotting a girl going through ballet movements in an empty dance room, pauses to watch in amazement. When the girl speaks to him, Jeremy is tongue-tied and barely able to make small talk. Later, Jeremy confides in Ralph that he thought the girl was beautiful, but Ralph laughs when Jeremy realizes he never found out her name. After learning that the girl is new student Susan Rollins, the smitten Jeremy goes to his afternoon job as a dog walker, and in Central Park reads poetry to the pack of patient dogs. That evening at dinner, Susan’s father Ned, who has recently relocated to New York from Detroit in search of work, worries about Susan making friends, but she assures him that she is getting along fine at school. The next day, Jeremy spots Susan in a record shop and follows her through the streets. Over the next couple of days Jeremy continues following Susan whenever he can, but confesses to Ralph that he is too shy to speak with her as she is older and in a higher grade. When Jeremy continues to ignore Ralph’s suggestion to speak to Susan in a neutral area like the cafeteria, Ralph himself goes to talk to her, forcing the scandalized Jeremy to rush out into the hallway. Ralph finds Jeremy to announce that Susan has agreed to have Jeremy telephone her. Ecstatic, Jeremy considers approaching Susan after school until he witnesses her walking with an older, handsome student, Danny. At cello rehearsal the following day, the teacher points out that while Jeremy’s technique is strong, he must also apply emotion to his musical interpretation. Jeremy confesses to feeling nervous about the recital, but the teacher assures him he will perform well. That weekend, Susan attends the recital and is moved by Jeremy’s expressive playing. Afterward, Susan goes backstage to congratulate Jeremy, who again finds himself tongue-tied. After basketball the following week, Jeremy asks Ralph for advice on how to talk to Susan, then that evening at home uses Ralph’s written advice as a guideline to rehearse his call. Unable to summon the nerve that night, Jeremy impulsively calls at nine the next morning. Amused by the early call, Susan accepts Jeremy’s offer to go to the movie that evening. Discovering a long line at the theater, the couple decides to go to a pizza restaurant instead. There, Jeremy soon relaxes and is able to talk to Susan about himself and asks about her family. Susan confides that her mother died when she was a child, while Jeremy describes how his Jewish family came to have the last name of “Jones.” At the end of the evening, Susan says she enjoyed their date and confesses she originally thought Jeremy might be “goofy” until she heard his cello performance. The next day, Jeremy arrives outside Susan’s apartment building very early to walk her to school and the pair soon become a couple, spending all of their free time together. When Ralph expresses concern that his best friend has deserted him, Jeremy reveals that he believes he is in love. On one early morning date, Jeremy takes Susan to the racetrack where horses are being worked out. Initially Susan disbelieves Jeremy’s claim that he can continually select race winners, until he demonstrates with the next race but confesses that he never actually places any wagers. Over the next several days, Jeremy and Susan visit the zoo and a museum, wander the city streets and walk dogs in the park. One afternoon over a chess game, Jeremy asks Susan if she is bored by their unexciting activities. After Susan assures him she truly enjoys the time they spend together, Jeremy confesses that Ralph saw her the previous day with Danny. Susan acknowledges speaking with Danny to tell him that she is in love with Jeremy. Overcome, Jeremy agrees that he feels the same and the couple kiss, embrace and eventually have sex. That night, Susan arrives at her apartment to find her aunt Eunice and several friends visiting. Ned excitedly announces that his former boss in Detroit contacted him with a new job offer, including a substantial raise and stock options, and consequently, will be returning to Detroit right away. Stunned, Susan asks specifically when and Ned replies that since he has only been free-lance consulting, he is able to depart within two days. Initially Susan tries to explain about her growing attachment and affection for Jeremy, but when Ned insists that the teens have not known each other long enough to form a genuine relationship, Susan realizes nothing she will say will alter the situation. The next day, a despondent Susan reveals the sudden events to Jeremy, who is crushed. When Susan breaks into tears, however, Jeremy pulls himself together and comforts her. Later, Jeremy visits his father at work to ask for advice, but Ben brushes him aside and says they can speak later. Upon confiding the news to Ralph, Jeremy is disappointed that his friend fails to see the gravity of the situation. Two days later, Jeremy accompanies Susan and Ned to the airport, where the young couple embraces and kiss farewell. +

In New York City, high school sophomore Jeremy Jones begins his day with his usual trip to the nearby candy store where he studies the horse racing form and selects the eventual winner, although he never bets. At school during his private cello lesson, Jeremy’s teacher tells him that as long as his attention is divided he will never be a great musician, but Jeremy insists that is his goal. That afternoon, Jeremy and his best friend Ralph Manzoni join others for a game of basketball before Jeremy sets off for home. While doing his homework that night, Jeremy listens to loud music through headphones until his father Ben chastises him, insisting that no one can do two things well at the same time. The next day in music class, Jeremy rehearses with other classmates for an upcoming recital in which he has a major solo. Sent to look for chalk later in the class, Jeremy goes down the hall and is captivated by a girl going through ballet movement in an empty dance room. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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