40 Carats (1973)

PG | 108-110 mins | Comedy | July 1973

Director:

Milton Katselas

Writer:

Leonard Gershe

Producer:

Mike Frankovich

Cinematographer:

Charles Lang Jr.

Editor:

David Blewitt

Production Designer:

Robert Clatworthy

Production Company:

Frankovich Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film is based on the Paris stage hit by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Grédy, who are listed in the onscreen credits as Barillet & Grédy. Julie Harris was starring as “Ann Stanley” in the Broadway run of the play when Columbia bought the rights, and actresses Barbara Rush, Zsa Zsa Gabor and Lana Turner went on to portray the character in road company productions.
       Early in 1969, a full page ad in HR announced that William Wyler would produce the film, and the later items reported that Julie Andrews and Audrey Hepburn were among the actresses being considered by him for the lead. In 1969, Var noted that Wyler had signed Frederick Kohner to write the script and by Apr 1970, DV listed I. A. L. Diamond, who had adapted the Barillet & Grédy play Cactus Flower for the screen as the writer, but neither writer was credited when the film went into production in late 1972, and their contribution to the final screenplay is doubtful. In 1971, Wyler received doctors' orders to take a year off work, and the picture was eventually turned over to Ross Hunter as his first feature for Columbia.
       The film marked the motion picture debuts of Deborah Raffin, who played Trina, and Brooke Palance, actor Jack Palance’s daughter, in a small role. Gene Kelly returned to screen acting after an eight-year absence, delaying some directorial work to take the role of "Billy Boylan." Producer M. J. “Mike” Frankovich’s wife, Binnie Barnes, played “Maude Ericson." Their son, Mike, Jr., was a unit manager on the film and son Peter worked ... More Less

The film is based on the Paris stage hit by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Grédy, who are listed in the onscreen credits as Barillet & Grédy. Julie Harris was starring as “Ann Stanley” in the Broadway run of the play when Columbia bought the rights, and actresses Barbara Rush, Zsa Zsa Gabor and Lana Turner went on to portray the character in road company productions.
       Early in 1969, a full page ad in HR announced that William Wyler would produce the film, and the later items reported that Julie Andrews and Audrey Hepburn were among the actresses being considered by him for the lead. In 1969, Var noted that Wyler had signed Frederick Kohner to write the script and by Apr 1970, DV listed I. A. L. Diamond, who had adapted the Barillet & Grédy play Cactus Flower for the screen as the writer, but neither writer was credited when the film went into production in late 1972, and their contribution to the final screenplay is doubtful. In 1971, Wyler received doctors' orders to take a year off work, and the picture was eventually turned over to Ross Hunter as his first feature for Columbia.
       The film marked the motion picture debuts of Deborah Raffin, who played Trina, and Brooke Palance, actor Jack Palance’s daughter, in a small role. Gene Kelly returned to screen acting after an eight-year absence, delaying some directorial work to take the role of "Billy Boylan." Producer M. J. “Mike” Frankovich’s wife, Binnie Barnes, played “Maude Ericson." Their son, Mike, Jr., was a unit manager on the film and son Peter worked as a story consultant.
       News items in DV and Var reported that location filming began in Greece, in and around Athens and at Vouliagmeni Lake in Loutraki, near Corinth and continued with a week of shooting in New York City, plus seven weeks of interior filming at The Burbank Studios, which, at the time, Columbia shared with Warner Bros. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
31 Jul 1972.
---
Box Office
30 Jul 1973
p. 4611.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1970.
---
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1971.
---
Daily Variety
27 Nov 1972.
---
Daily Variety
5 Jan 1973.
---
Daily Variety
10 Jan 1973.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1973.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1969.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1969.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1972
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1972
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 1973
p. 3, 10.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
10 May 1971.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
20 Jun 1973.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
27 Jun 1973.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Jun 1973.
---
MPHPD
4 Jul 1973.
---
New York Times
29 Jun 1973
p. 14.
Newsweek
16 Jul 1973.
---
Time
6 Aug 1973.
---
Variety
12 Nov 1969.
---
Variety
23 Sep 1970.
---
Variety
27 Sep 1972.
---
Variety
8 Nov 1972.
---
Variety
27 Jun 1973
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Frankovich Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
Company grip
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Prod illustrator
Sketch artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop man
Leadman
Const coord
Standby painter
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Women's cost
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Story consultant
Exec prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Prod mgr, Greece
Bus affairs
Speech consultant
Billiards tech adv
Craft service
Security
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Quarante Carats by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Grédy adapated by Jay Allen, produced on the New York stage by David Merrick (New York, 26 Dec 1968).
SONGS
"In Every Corner of the World," music by Michel Legrand, lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1973
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 June 1973
Production Date:
9 October 1972--mid January 1973
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 June 1973
Copyright Number:
LP42415
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Duration(in mins):
108-110
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Divorced Manhattan real estate agent Ann Stanley is touring Greece when her car breaks down on a deserted road. When a young American, Peter Latham, offers to take Ann to the nearest garage on his motorcycle, she declines, saying that at thirty-six, she is too old for such things. Peter and Ann drink ouzo and chat until she becomes suspicious of his intentions and angered, he calls her a silly woman and leaves her there. Soon after, Ann walks to the bay where Peter is snorkeling, and introducing herself as Penelope Potter, joins him for a swim. That night by a campfire, Peter gives Ann a ring that he found in the sea and they make love. The next morning, Ann is dressed when she hears a fishing boat and gets onboard, leaving Peter asleep on the beach. Back in her New York office, Ann is meeting with her client, wealthy widower J. D. Rogers, when her gregarious ex-husband, actor Billy Boylan enters, regaling Ann’s assistant, Margie Margolin, with tales of his recent successes. When Billy makes his usual request for money, Ann responds with a dreamy non-sequitur about Greece and Billy remarks that he has never seen her in such a state. AS J. D. departs, he invites Ann to lunch and Margie accepts for her, later encouraging Ann to flirt with the rich prospect, but Ann retorts that at thirty-nine she is too old for that behavior. At Ann’s apartment, her lively mother, Maud Ericson, is questioning Ann’s seventeen-year-old daughter Trina about her upcoming date with a boy named Arthur. Arthur’s friend, Peter, arrives to pick up ... +


Divorced Manhattan real estate agent Ann Stanley is touring Greece when her car breaks down on a deserted road. When a young American, Peter Latham, offers to take Ann to the nearest garage on his motorcycle, she declines, saying that at thirty-six, she is too old for such things. Peter and Ann drink ouzo and chat until she becomes suspicious of his intentions and angered, he calls her a silly woman and leaves her there. Soon after, Ann walks to the bay where Peter is snorkeling, and introducing herself as Penelope Potter, joins him for a swim. That night by a campfire, Peter gives Ann a ring that he found in the sea and they make love. The next morning, Ann is dressed when she hears a fishing boat and gets onboard, leaving Peter asleep on the beach. Back in her New York office, Ann is meeting with her client, wealthy widower J. D. Rogers, when her gregarious ex-husband, actor Billy Boylan enters, regaling Ann’s assistant, Margie Margolin, with tales of his recent successes. When Billy makes his usual request for money, Ann responds with a dreamy non-sequitur about Greece and Billy remarks that he has never seen her in such a state. AS J. D. departs, he invites Ann to lunch and Margie accepts for her, later encouraging Ann to flirt with the rich prospect, but Ann retorts that at thirty-nine she is too old for that behavior. At Ann’s apartment, her lively mother, Maud Ericson, is questioning Ann’s seventeen-year-old daughter Trina about her upcoming date with a boy named Arthur. Arthur’s friend, Peter, arrives to pick up Trina and is as shocked as Ann is when they see each other. Peter explains his reaction by saying that Ann reminds him of a woman he met in Greece, and noticing that Ann is wearing the ring he gave her, pointedly asks if she enjoyed her trip. This prompts Maud to embarrass Ann by relating how she spent the night in a convent when her car broke down. After they leave, Maud expresses her hope that Trina will marry the wealthy Peter, while Peter asks Trina if her mother wants to remarry, which Trina thinks is unlikely because Ann is forty. The next evening, Ann is angry when Peter arrives at her office, insisting that something more than sex happened between them in Greece and announcing that he wants to continue seeing her. Ann refuses, citing their age difference. Peter has almost accepted her arguments and agreed to leave when Maud enters and invites him home for tea. At home, Ann continues to try to get rid of Peter, but Maud, eager to match him with Trina, invites him to stay for dinner. J. D. arrives for a date with Ann and they are about to depart when Billy appears with Chinese food, and not wanting to spoil the family evening, J. D. offers to take everyone out. Defeated, Ann goes into the kitchen and when Peter follows her, they kiss. The next morning, Billy complains to Ann about his financial problems and asks her to help him get a job with J. D.’s company, saying that she can get anything from any man. When Ann rejects the compliment, again noting her age, Billy admonishes her not to count her years, but rather to think of herself as a diamond with forty carats. They are interrupted when Peter calls, asking Ann to meet him in a secluded place, but she suggests the skating rink at Rockefeller Plaza. While they skate, Peter declares his love for Ann and asks her to marry him. Ann is upset when one of her mother’s friends sees them together, but Peter persuades her to consider his proposal in spite of what others might think. Ann returns home and having learned about the skating date, Maud suggests that Peter has been courting Ann to get to Trina. When Maud asks if Peter mentioned love or marriage, Ann confirms that he did, but with her, not Trina. Meeting J. D. in his new apartment, Ann is uncomfortable when he hints about remarrying and alarmed when he reveals that his interest is in Trina, whom he has been seeing in secret. Ann confronts Trina who confirms that she loves J. D. and intends to marry him whether Ann approves or not. Conceding that she only wants her daughter’s happiness, Ann gives her blessing. Later, Billy laughs when Ann tells him about Peter’s proposal, but soon becomes angry and ridicules her. When Ann asks why he is being unkind, he confesses that he is jealous, having assumed they would someday remarry. Reconsidering, Billy advises Ann to reject public opinion, saying that if she loves Peter, she should let nothing stand in her way. When Billy leaves, Ann calls Peter’s office, telling his secretary to announce her as Penelope Potter. Now a couple, Peter takes Ann to a friend’s party, but Ann becomes uncomfortable when she meets some of Peter’s ex-girl friends and he suggests that they leave. Outside, when Ann jealously questions Peter about his past, he calmly suggests that they continue their date elsewhere and they go to a restaurant where they make wedding plans. Deciding to marry on the beach where they met, Peter convinces Ann to leave for Greece the following Saturday. When Peter gives Ann an engagement ring, she nervously confesses her true age and he reveals that Trina already told him she was forty. Peter informs Ann that his parents are flying to New York to meet her, assuring her that they are happy about the union. Surprised when Peter’s parents move their meeting with her to an earlier time, Ann rushes to their hotel, where Mr. Latham warmly welcomes her. Mr. Latham explains that he wanted to meet Ann before Peter arrived, implying that he and his son do not get along and when he urges Ann to postpone the wedding, his hostility and true feelings about the age difference become apparent. Ann is in tears by the time Peter arrives and, furious at his father for reviving her doubts, he follows her out, desperately trying to convince her that they can be happy together in spite of society’s conventions. However, Ann responds that she can not go through with their plans and Peter counters that he will be on the plane regardless, angrily repeating the phrase he used at their first meeting about her being a silly woman. Ann goes home and locks herself in her room, refusing to talk to her family who are discussing the sad turn of events when Billy arrives. Opening her bedroom door, Ann announces that she has decided to remarry Billy, but knowing that she loves Peter, he convinces her to stop thinking and start feeling. Realizing that Billy is right, Ann rushes to the airport and catches the next flight to Greece. On the road where she first met Peter, Ann drops her bags and runs to the beach, sadly seeing no one, but when she returns to the road, Peter pulls up on his motorcycle and they happily ride down to the beach together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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