Artists and Models Abroad (1938)

90 mins | Musical comedy | 30 December 1938

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HISTORY

This film is a sequel to Artists and Models (see above). Press material states that Paramount's "stock girls," models Joyce Mathews, Yvonne Duval, Gwen Kenyon, Sheila Darcy, Mary "Punkins" Parker, Marie De Forest and Dolores Casey, were called the "Seven Cinderellas." In a modern source, Leisen states that he sent a woman to Paris to supervise the dress-making by the famous French couturiers. Along with Patou, Leisen lists Chanel, Mainboucher, and Molyneux, all three of whom were not credited on the film. When Leisen's envoy returned to the U.S. with the dresses, Leisen chose models that fitted them as closely as possible. One Alix white jersey, he notes, was worn by "Kansas" [Marie De Forest], who was the only model skinny enough to fit into it. Leisen says he designed Mary Parker's dress, which she later copied in black for her nightclub shows at the St. Regis in New York. According to Leisen, Joan Bennett was "just furious" when she learned she had to wear a dress trimmed with silver Christmas tree ornaments. Eleanor Broder (apparently Leisen's assistant) also interviewed in the modern source, reports that Jack Benny did his radio show on Sunday nights during the film's shooting, and his writers would meet with him on the set to confer about material for the next week's show. When the film's shooting was over, Benny reportedly gave everybody on the crew a ... More Less

This film is a sequel to Artists and Models (see above). Press material states that Paramount's "stock girls," models Joyce Mathews, Yvonne Duval, Gwen Kenyon, Sheila Darcy, Mary "Punkins" Parker, Marie De Forest and Dolores Casey, were called the "Seven Cinderellas." In a modern source, Leisen states that he sent a woman to Paris to supervise the dress-making by the famous French couturiers. Along with Patou, Leisen lists Chanel, Mainboucher, and Molyneux, all three of whom were not credited on the film. When Leisen's envoy returned to the U.S. with the dresses, Leisen chose models that fitted them as closely as possible. One Alix white jersey, he notes, was worn by "Kansas" [Marie De Forest], who was the only model skinny enough to fit into it. Leisen says he designed Mary Parker's dress, which she later copied in black for her nightclub shows at the St. Regis in New York. According to Leisen, Joan Bennett was "just furious" when she learned she had to wear a dress trimmed with silver Christmas tree ornaments. Eleanor Broder (apparently Leisen's assistant) also interviewed in the modern source, reports that Jack Benny did his radio show on Sunday nights during the film's shooting, and his writers would meet with him on the set to confer about material for the next week's show. When the film's shooting was over, Benny reportedly gave everybody on the crew a check. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Oct 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
2 Nov 38
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 38
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 38
pp. 10-11.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
28 Oct 38
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Jul 38
p. 29.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Oct 38
p. 47.
New York Times
22 Dec 38
p. 25.
Variety
2 Nov 38
p. 15
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Andre Cheron
Charles De Ravenne
Robert Du Couedic
Ray De Ravenne
Paula De Cardo
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Idea by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Int dec
COSTUMES
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Gowns for the Palace of Feminine Arts especially c
Prod gowns by
Hats by
Hats by
Lingerie by
Lingerie by
Lingerie by
Fashion consultant
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus adv
Vocal ensembles
Mus numbers staged by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
SOURCES
SONGS
"You're Lovely Madame," "Do the Buckaroo" and "What Have You Got That Gets Me," words by Leo Robin, music by Ralph Rainger
"You're Broke, You Dope," words and music by The Yacht Club Boys and Jack Rock.
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 December 1938
Production Date:
mid May--mid July 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
30 December 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8530
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4433
SYNOPSIS

Patricia Harper, daughter of Texas oil man and millionaire James Harper, is vacationing with her Aunt Isabel Channing in Paris. There she dines with her fiancé, Eliott Winthrop, who is soon to be an important diplomat. Bored by Eliott's snobby friends, Pat joins an American theatrical troupe led by Buck Boswell that is stranded in Paris. After faking an attempt at suicide so the troupe can flee a hotel, Pat and her father sleep with the troupe backstage at the Exposition Internationale, which will feature a pageant of the history of the feminine arts. After Buck convinces a group of Russian models that they are too late for the dress rehearsal, his troupe becomes part of the show. When Pat admires a necklace on loan from the French government that Napoleon gave to Josephine, James steals it in order to get it copied. The police arrive and the troupe flees to the Royal Carlton, where Pat gets them a suite. When Eliott discovers James's and Pat's picture in the paper as Russian impostors, Pat shamefully quits the troupe. Buck believes Pat and James are indigent and so proposes to Pat in order to keep her off the streets, but she declines, keeping her identity a mystery. James then hides the copied jewels in Buck's drawer, and when Buck discovers them he deems James a thief. Gantvoort, a Dutch businessman, then arrives to secure James' sale of his oil lands to him, and Buck tears up the contract, insisting James is a crook. Buck then returns the necklace, and the authorities discover it is a fake and imprison Buck and the troupe, ... +


Patricia Harper, daughter of Texas oil man and millionaire James Harper, is vacationing with her Aunt Isabel Channing in Paris. There she dines with her fiancé, Eliott Winthrop, who is soon to be an important diplomat. Bored by Eliott's snobby friends, Pat joins an American theatrical troupe led by Buck Boswell that is stranded in Paris. After faking an attempt at suicide so the troupe can flee a hotel, Pat and her father sleep with the troupe backstage at the Exposition Internationale, which will feature a pageant of the history of the feminine arts. After Buck convinces a group of Russian models that they are too late for the dress rehearsal, his troupe becomes part of the show. When Pat admires a necklace on loan from the French government that Napoleon gave to Josephine, James steals it in order to get it copied. The police arrive and the troupe flees to the Royal Carlton, where Pat gets them a suite. When Eliott discovers James's and Pat's picture in the paper as Russian impostors, Pat shamefully quits the troupe. Buck believes Pat and James are indigent and so proposes to Pat in order to keep her off the streets, but she declines, keeping her identity a mystery. James then hides the copied jewels in Buck's drawer, and when Buck discovers them he deems James a thief. Gantvoort, a Dutch businessman, then arrives to secure James' sale of his oil lands to him, and Buck tears up the contract, insisting James is a crook. Buck then returns the necklace, and the authorities discover it is a fake and imprison Buck and the troupe, releasing them only so that Buck can lead them to the real jewels. At the Cafe Trocadero, all converge, and after the necklace is shot out of a cannon, Buck retrieves it and James explains his intentions and his real identity. Buck is absolved of guilt and deported along with his troupe, and James thanks Buck for saving his oil fields, which have recently increased in value. As they leave Paris, Buck and Pat make plans to marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.