Together Brothers (1974)

PG | 94-96 mins | Drama | 7 August 1974

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HISTORY

The working title for the film was Mr. Kool, as stated in a 29 Mar 1972 DV news item.
       Opening credits list "Charles Robinson" as a cast member, although Robinson's name does not appear in reviews or studio publicity materials in AMPAS library files; the name may have mistakenly appeared in place of "Charles Lemons," who was credited in reviews and publicity materials. In the end credits, producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Police Chief D. K. Lack and the Galveston Police Department; Floyd Courville and the St. Vincent’s Center; Warren Skaaren and the Texas Film Commission; Howard Picard; Margaret Bott; Kermit Courville; and the people of Galveston, TX.
       The 29 Mar 1972 DV announced that Cinema Center Films would produce Together Brothers, then titled Mr. Kool, with Sanford Howard’s production company. Cinema Center had recently announced plans to produce three other projects including Pamplona, A Life in the Day of Swede Silverman, and Alien Thunder, after a considerable period of inactivity in the film production field, according to DV. In a 2 Apr 1974 news brief, DV reported that Twentieth Century-Fox Film. Corp. had acquired distribution rights from Sandy Howard Productions; Cinema Center was not mentioned in the article and received no onscreen credit.
       According to the 14 Aug 1974 Var and 6 Nov 1974 LAT reviews, principal photography took place in Galveston, TX, where the story is set.
       Together Brothers marked fifteen-year-old Ahmad Nurradin’s feature film acting ... More Less

The working title for the film was Mr. Kool, as stated in a 29 Mar 1972 DV news item.
       Opening credits list "Charles Robinson" as a cast member, although Robinson's name does not appear in reviews or studio publicity materials in AMPAS library files; the name may have mistakenly appeared in place of "Charles Lemons," who was credited in reviews and publicity materials. In the end credits, producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Police Chief D. K. Lack and the Galveston Police Department; Floyd Courville and the St. Vincent’s Center; Warren Skaaren and the Texas Film Commission; Howard Picard; Margaret Bott; Kermit Courville; and the people of Galveston, TX.
       The 29 Mar 1972 DV announced that Cinema Center Films would produce Together Brothers, then titled Mr. Kool, with Sanford Howard’s production company. Cinema Center had recently announced plans to produce three other projects including Pamplona, A Life in the Day of Swede Silverman, and Alien Thunder, after a considerable period of inactivity in the film production field, according to DV. In a 2 Apr 1974 news brief, DV reported that Twentieth Century-Fox Film. Corp. had acquired distribution rights from Sandy Howard Productions; Cinema Center was not mentioned in the article and received no onscreen credit.
       According to the 14 Aug 1974 Var and 6 Nov 1974 LAT reviews, principal photography took place in Galveston, TX, where the story is set.
       Together Brothers marked fifteen-year-old Ahmad Nurradin’s feature film acting debut.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Mar 1974.
---
Box Office
26 Aug 1974
p. 4715.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1972.
---
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1974.
---
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Nov 1974.
---
New York Times
8 Aug 1974
p. 30.
Variety
14 Aug 1974
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sanford Howard Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr/Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Chief elec
Key grip
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus cond
SOUND
Prod mixer
Re-rec mixer
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Creative & tech consultant
Casting dir
Asst to prod
Scr supv
Prod asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"Somebody Is Gonna Off The Man," sung by Love Unlimited, music and lyrics by Barry White
"People Of Tomorrow Are The Children Of Today," sung by Love Unlimited, music and lyrics by Barry White.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mr. Kool
Release Date:
7 August 1974
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 7 August 1974
Los Angeles opening: 6 November 1974
Production Date:
in Galveston, TX
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
9 October 1974
Copyright Number:
LP44013
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by De Luxe®
Duration(in mins):
94-96
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Galveston, Texas, an African-American policeman nicknamed “Mr. Kool” orders Sugar, a prostitute, to stop loitering. He spots A.P., a teenager, stealing a bottle of liquor from Willy’s liquor store and gives chase. A.P. joins a group of friends in an abandoned building where H.J., the group’s leader, reprimands him for stealing. Mr. Kool arrives and warns the teenagers against lives of crime. That night, H.J.’s younger brother Tommy sees Mr. Kool patrol the neighborhood and follows him. An assassin dressed in black appears, shooting Mr. Kool dead and stripping him naked. The killer spots Tommy, but discovers his gun is out of ammunition. As the killer flees, H.J.’s crew ushers Tommy away before police arrive. At their house, H.J. delivers Tommy, who has been struck mute, to their grandmother, Mama Wes, explaining that Tommy saw Mr. Kool’s murder. Soon after, H.J. speaks to Dr. Johnson, who runs the community recreation center. Concerned that Tommy is not speaking, Johnson encourages H.J. to help the boy regain his speech. Outside a church, H.J.’s crew listens to Mr. Kool’s funeral service over a loudspeaker. Elsewhere, Tommy runs to the abandoned building that H.J. and his friends frequent, but finds it empty. The killer stalks the young boy inside, but a passing police car scares him off. As the funeral party leaves the church, H.J. approaches Mr. Kool’s wife and expresses his condolences, telling her “the street” owes something to her husband. However, the widow responds that her husband died in vain. H.J.’s group seeks out Vega, a Mexican-American gangster who has access to police files. Hoping to solve Mr. Kool’s murder, H.J. asks Vega for help, but Vega claims African Americans ... +


In Galveston, Texas, an African-American policeman nicknamed “Mr. Kool” orders Sugar, a prostitute, to stop loitering. He spots A.P., a teenager, stealing a bottle of liquor from Willy’s liquor store and gives chase. A.P. joins a group of friends in an abandoned building where H.J., the group’s leader, reprimands him for stealing. Mr. Kool arrives and warns the teenagers against lives of crime. That night, H.J.’s younger brother Tommy sees Mr. Kool patrol the neighborhood and follows him. An assassin dressed in black appears, shooting Mr. Kool dead and stripping him naked. The killer spots Tommy, but discovers his gun is out of ammunition. As the killer flees, H.J.’s crew ushers Tommy away before police arrive. At their house, H.J. delivers Tommy, who has been struck mute, to their grandmother, Mama Wes, explaining that Tommy saw Mr. Kool’s murder. Soon after, H.J. speaks to Dr. Johnson, who runs the community recreation center. Concerned that Tommy is not speaking, Johnson encourages H.J. to help the boy regain his speech. Outside a church, H.J.’s crew listens to Mr. Kool’s funeral service over a loudspeaker. Elsewhere, Tommy runs to the abandoned building that H.J. and his friends frequent, but finds it empty. The killer stalks the young boy inside, but a passing police car scares him off. As the funeral party leaves the church, H.J. approaches Mr. Kool’s wife and expresses his condolences, telling her “the street” owes something to her husband. However, the widow responds that her husband died in vain. H.J.’s group seeks out Vega, a Mexican-American gangster who has access to police files. Hoping to solve Mr. Kool’s murder, H.J. asks Vega for help, but Vega claims African Americans have never done anything for his people. However, H.J. reminds Vega that Mr. Kool helped him. That night, H.J.’s gang pretend to fight with Vega’s Mexican American gang to distract the police. Meanwhile, Vega and H.J. sneak into the police station. Using stolen keys, they break into a file room, where they steal Mr. Kool’s file. The next day, H.J. and his friends search the file for information about criminals that Mr. Kool arrested, believing that one of them may be the murderer. Splitting up to investigate their leads, H.J. goes to a brothel in search of Willie the Pimp, while A.P. goes to the home of Maria, a transvestite, looking for a man named Billy Most. Although Maria denies knowing Most, he emerges from a back room after A.P. leaves. In a pool hall, H.J. and his friends are badly beaten when they ask about a drug addict named Frank Crown. Back at Maria’s apartment, Billy Most cuddles a plastic baby doll and frets about being caught. Encouraging Most to run away, Maria reminds him about the time he was arrested by Mr. Kool for kidnapping a baby. Although Maria insists that kidnapping is wrong, Most argues that the baby loved and needed him. He recalls being stripped naked and shamed by Mr. Kool. Later, H.J. learns from his girlfriend, a young prostitute named Francine, that Billy Most was spotted at Maria’s apartment by one of Francine’s clients, and that when Most kidnapped a baby, Mr. Kool arrested him at a party and forced him to strip naked. Since Mr. Kool’s killer stripped the clothes off of his dead body, H.J. realizes that Most is the killer. At Maria’s apartment, the boys find her dead, hanging by a rope from the ceiling. Meanwhile, Most goes to the abandoned building, where Tommy and Francine are sleeping on a couch. Most stabs Francine to death and chases Tommy, who runs into a nearby warehouse. H.J. and his crew return and are shocked to find Francine dead. Outside the warehouse, Most catches Tommy, cradles him in his arms, and calls him his “baby.” A man working the night shift spots the two and calls the police. H.J.’s gang appears, and H.J. holds Most at gunpoint, allowing Tommy to run free. As police cars rush to the scene, Most begs H.J. to kill him, but H.J. remains frozen. Having regained his speech, Tommy calls out his brother’s name. Most is arrested, and H.J. hands over his gun to a police officer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.