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HISTORY

An early script located in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS library credits Grover Jones and William "Slavens" McNutt with the screenplay, Sam Mintz with adaptation, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz and Norman McLeod with additional dialogue. Jones' and McNutt's contribution to the final film has not been determined. Scenes shot for this film are included in the 1931 Paramount promotional film The House That Shadows Built (see above). Some scenes were filmed on location in San Bernardino, CA. This film is the sequel to Skippy (see ... More Less

An early script located in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS library credits Grover Jones and William "Slavens" McNutt with the screenplay, Sam Mintz with adaptation, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz and Norman McLeod with additional dialogue. Jones' and McNutt's contribution to the final film has not been determined. Scenes shot for this film are included in the 1931 Paramount promotional film The House That Shadows Built (see above). Some scenes were filmed on location in San Bernardino, CA. This film is the sequel to Skippy (see above). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Dec 31
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Dec 31
p. 3.
International Photographer
1 Jan 32
p. 30.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Dec 31
p. 36.
New York Times
21 Dec 31
p. 28.
Variety
22 Dec 31
p. 19.
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 December 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount- Publix Corp.
Copyright Date:
2 January 1932
Copyright Number:
LP2734
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Skippy, son of Dr. Herbert and Mrs. Skinner, adamantly stands by his poor friend, Sooky Wayne, who lives in Shantytown with his sickly mother. The Boone Boys, a boys' club that costs thirty dollars to join and has uniforms that Sooky admires, refuses to admit him because he is poor. Sooky and Skippy form their own club called the Beagle Boys. Sidney Saunders, whose father is competing for mayor against Dr. Skinner, is the leader of the Boone Boys and constantly teases Sooky. After Mr. Willoughby, a poor resident of Shantytown, is taken away to live in a sanitarium because he does not have enough food, Skippy fears for Sooky and his tubercular mother and buys them groceries on his father's credit. Mrs. Wayne gently admonishes Skippy, however, and he is forced to return the groceries. When Dr. Skinner finds out about the groceries, and an egg that Skippy threw at Sidney, he grounds Skippy. Mrs. Skinner relents a little, and Skippy is able to visit Sooky's house, where he finds out that Sooky's relatives want to take him away from his mother. After Sooky learns to play the bugle, Skippy convinces Sidney to let them join the Boone Boys. Sidney forces them to do chores, one of which includes marching in a parade supporting his father as mayor. While making a speech nearby, Dr. Skinner and his audience see Skippy marching in the rival's parade. Humiliated, Skippy runs away with Sooky. Later, Sooky sneaks off and returns to the Skinner's, telling them that Skippy had only been trying to protect him. At the same time, Skippy goes to Sooky's house, where ... +


Skippy, son of Dr. Herbert and Mrs. Skinner, adamantly stands by his poor friend, Sooky Wayne, who lives in Shantytown with his sickly mother. The Boone Boys, a boys' club that costs thirty dollars to join and has uniforms that Sooky admires, refuses to admit him because he is poor. Sooky and Skippy form their own club called the Beagle Boys. Sidney Saunders, whose father is competing for mayor against Dr. Skinner, is the leader of the Boone Boys and constantly teases Sooky. After Mr. Willoughby, a poor resident of Shantytown, is taken away to live in a sanitarium because he does not have enough food, Skippy fears for Sooky and his tubercular mother and buys them groceries on his father's credit. Mrs. Wayne gently admonishes Skippy, however, and he is forced to return the groceries. When Dr. Skinner finds out about the groceries, and an egg that Skippy threw at Sidney, he grounds Skippy. Mrs. Skinner relents a little, and Skippy is able to visit Sooky's house, where he finds out that Sooky's relatives want to take him away from his mother. After Sooky learns to play the bugle, Skippy convinces Sidney to let them join the Boone Boys. Sidney forces them to do chores, one of which includes marching in a parade supporting his father as mayor. While making a speech nearby, Dr. Skinner and his audience see Skippy marching in the rival's parade. Humiliated, Skippy runs away with Sooky. Later, Sooky sneaks off and returns to the Skinner's, telling them that Skippy had only been trying to protect him. At the same time, Skippy goes to Sooky's house, where Mrs. Wayne succumbs to her tuberculosis and dies. Dr. Skinner reconciles with the saddened Skippy and without fully revealing the tragedy of his mother's death, takes Sooky in to live with them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.