Back to the Future (1985)

PG | 116 mins | Comedy, Science fiction | 3 July 1985

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HISTORY

End credits include a “Special Thanks” to the following individuals and organizations: Mark Campbell; Tim May; Stephen Semel; Gregg Landaker; Steve Maslow; Ron Hitchcock; Photographic Illustration Company, Burbank, California; and Group IV Scoring Facility. A clip from the television series The Honeymooners (CBS, 1 Oct 1955--22 Sep 1956) receives the following acknowledgement in the end credits: “’The Honeymooners’ excerpt used with permission of CBS Inc., film clip courtesy of Viacom Enterprises.”
       According to production notes from AMPAS library files, writer-director Robert Zemeckis and writer Bob Gale began work on the screenplay in fall 1980, aiming to tell a story about time travel that did not require viewers to have any history knowledge. In a 7 Jul 1985 Chicago Tribune interview, Zemeckis stated that executive producer Steven Spielberg, with whom he had collaborated on the box-office failures I Wanna Hold Your Hand and Used Cars (1978 and 1980, see entries), expressed interest in the project after reading the script; however, Zemeckis did not want to burden Spielberg with another potential box-office flop, so he set out to find other supporters. Subsequently, Zemeckis said that “absolutely everybody” in Hollywood passed on Back to the Future, and studios expressed interest only after the success of Zemeckis’s next film, Romancing the Stone (1980, see entry). Once the script had become a desirable property, Zemeckis brought Back to the Future back to Spielberg, and the film was set up by Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment with financing from Universal Pictures.
       Eric Stoltz was originally cast as “Marty McFly,” as stated in the 7 Jul 1985 Chicago Tribune. After five weeks ... More Less

End credits include a “Special Thanks” to the following individuals and organizations: Mark Campbell; Tim May; Stephen Semel; Gregg Landaker; Steve Maslow; Ron Hitchcock; Photographic Illustration Company, Burbank, California; and Group IV Scoring Facility. A clip from the television series The Honeymooners (CBS, 1 Oct 1955--22 Sep 1956) receives the following acknowledgement in the end credits: “’The Honeymooners’ excerpt used with permission of CBS Inc., film clip courtesy of Viacom Enterprises.”
       According to production notes from AMPAS library files, writer-director Robert Zemeckis and writer Bob Gale began work on the screenplay in fall 1980, aiming to tell a story about time travel that did not require viewers to have any history knowledge. In a 7 Jul 1985 Chicago Tribune interview, Zemeckis stated that executive producer Steven Spielberg, with whom he had collaborated on the box-office failures I Wanna Hold Your Hand and Used Cars (1978 and 1980, see entries), expressed interest in the project after reading the script; however, Zemeckis did not want to burden Spielberg with another potential box-office flop, so he set out to find other supporters. Subsequently, Zemeckis said that “absolutely everybody” in Hollywood passed on Back to the Future, and studios expressed interest only after the success of Zemeckis’s next film, Romancing the Stone (1980, see entry). Once the script had become a desirable property, Zemeckis brought Back to the Future back to Spielberg, and the film was set up by Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment with financing from Universal Pictures.
       Eric Stoltz was originally cast as “Marty McFly,” as stated in the 7 Jul 1985 Chicago Tribune. After five weeks of filming, however, Stoltz was fired and replaced with Michael J. Fox. In a 17 Jan 1985 DV news item, Stoltz’s manager, Helen Sugland, described Stoltz’s firing as “totally out of left field” and stated that the actor had only received positive feedback from the director on set. Zemeckis explained to Chicago Tribune that Stoltz’s firing had nothing to do with the actor's talent, but stated that his “performance was not in synch with” Zemeckis’s vision. The footage shot during the first five weeks with Stoltz was scrapped, and the film’s release date was delayed from 21 Jun 1985 to 3 Jul 1985. For the remainder of production, Michael J. Fox, who was starring in the television series Family Ties (NBC, 22 Sep 1982--17 Sep 1989) at the time, spent days on the set of Family Ties and nights filming Back to the Future.
       As stated in production notes, Zemeckis and Gale initially imagined “Dr. ‘Doc’ Emmett Brown’s” time machine would be housed inside a refrigerator, but later decided on the DeLorean, a gull-winged sports car. As stated in a 19 Dec 1982 LAT article, the vehicle had been invented in 1975, but the DeLorean Motor Co. claimed bankruptcy in 1982, and the writers saw “potential for humor” in making the DeLorean their time machine. According to production notes, three DeLoreans were used in filming, with modifications to the vehicles made by special effects supervisor Kevin Pike, including the addition of “firejets” that shot flames from the car prior to takeoff. According to a 2002 letter from Universal Pictures’ publicity department found at AMPAS library, the DeLoreans were 1981 models, and one of them was cut open for interior shots. The time machine’s “Mr. Fusion Home Energy Reactor” was built using a Krups coffee grinder.
       An unsourced article by David Newport titled “’Back to the Future’ Team Head for Home” stated that the film was shot over seventy-five days at Universal Studios and on location in Los Angeles, CA, with a budget of $18 million. Production notes stated that Doc’s garage was built as a temporary construction on Victory Boulevard in Burbank, CA, while two houses designed by Charles and Henry Greene served as Doc’s 1950s home: the Gamble House and Blacker-Hill House, both in Pasadena, CA. The “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance was filmed inside a gymnasium at Hollywood, CA’s First United Methodist Church, with 150 background actors serving as dance attendees. According to Universal publicity materials from AMPAS library, President Richard Nixon’s alma mater, Whittier High School in Whittier, CA, served as the location for Hill Valley High School.
       A 10 Apr 1985 Var news item announced that Huey Lewis & The News would compose two songs for the film. One of the songs, “The Power of Love,” became the band’s first number one single and also received an Academy Award nomination, as stated in Universal publicity materials. Lewis also made his feature film acting debut with an uncredited appearance as a high school teacher judging Marty’s “Battle of the Bands” audition. Though the recording of “Johnny B. Goode” used for Marty McFly’s performance at the “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance was credited onscreen as being performed by “Marty McFly,” Mark Campbell was the actual singer and Tim May performed the guitar solo, according to Universal publicity materials; Campbell and May are the first two names listed in the “Special Thanks” section of the end credits.
       Cadbury chocolate licensed the rights to all T-shirts bearing the Back to the Future logo in its first cross-promotion with a feature film, as stated in an 8 Jul 1985 DV item. Every T-shirt purchased in retail stores included a one-dollar consumer rebate for Cadbury chocolate.
       Critical reception was largely positive, with high praise going to Zemeckis, who, according to Janet Maslin in a 3 Jul 1985 NYT review, had created his best work to date, taking a “bemused but unsentimental view of times gone by.” Kirk Ellis of HR also lauded Zemeckis’s “dandy direction” in his 24 Jun 1985 review and singled out actor Christopher Lloyd’s performance as Doc, saying he had “redefine[d] the mad scientist for modern movie audiences.” In a negative review on 3 Jul 1985, LAT’s Sheila Benson called the film “big, cartoonish, and empty.”
       Back to the Future took in $14.95 million in box office receipts in its first five days of release, as stated in a 7 Jul 1989 HR “Hollywood Report” column by Martin A. Grove. A 30 May 1990 LAT article reported that the film earned a total of $208 million at the domestic box-office, and, according to a 9 May 1990 HR item, the combined worldwide box-office gross of Back to the Future and Back to the Future Part II (1989, see entry) had amounted to nearly $700 million prior to the 25 May 1990 release of Back to the Future Part III (1990, see entry).
       Back to the Future won an Academy Award for Sound Effects Editing, and received the following Academy Award nominations: Music (Original Song) – “The Power of Love”; Sound; and Writing (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen). The film also won a Hugo award for “Best Dramatic presentation” at the World Science Fiction Convention, as reported in a 5 Sep 1986 DV brief.
       A 19 Aug 1985 DV news brief announced that McFly Inc., a chain of restaurants and bars based on the legend of “a fictional McFly family” whose members were attractive and heroic, sued Universal Pictures for misrepresenting the McFly name with characters who were “physically unattractive, unstylish, [and] graceless.” Although the lawsuit sought damages and “an injuction against use of the McFly name,” Universal won and the character names remained the same in the film’s sequels. In another lawsuit, Van Nuys, CA, resident Dana Rowe claimed that Universal, MCA, Inc., and the filmmakers promised him payment for his script titled Waiting for You and stole from its premise for the Back to the Future trilogy, as stated in a 20 Jun 1991 DV article. Rowe had previously filed a federal suit against Universal for “copyright infringement and unfair competition,” but the suit was thrown out by a judge. Rowe’s second claim was also dismissed, according to the website of Leopold Petrich & Smith, the law firm that represented Universal.
       According to Universal publicity materials, a title card with the message “To Be Continued” did not appear in the original film but was later added to “all video and television prints” in 1986 once the studio had official plans for a sequel. On 24 May 1990, Back to the Future was re-released along with Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III, one day before the wide release of Back to the Future Part III, as stated in the 9 May 1990 HR news item. Tickets for the triple feature were set at the regular admission price for one film.

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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
7 Jul 1985
Section 13, p. 2, 4.
Daily Variety
2 Jan 1985.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jan 1985.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jun 1985
p. 3, 6.
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1985.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1985.
---
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1985.
---
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1986.
---
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1991.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jun 2002.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 1985
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jul 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 1990
p. 3, 22.
Los Angeles Times
19 Dec 1982
Section A, p. 3, 30.
Los Angeles Times
3 Jul 1985
Calendar, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1988
Section II, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
30 May 1990
Calendar section, p. 1.
New York Times
3 Jul 1985
p. 18.
New York Times
8 Sep 1985
Section A, p. 29.
People
8 Jul 1985.
---
Variety
10 Apr 1985.
---
Variety
26 Jun 1985
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Steven Spielberg Presents
A Robert Zemeckis Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Prod illustrator
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Paint foreman
Scenic and graphic artist
Standby painter
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Drapery foreman
Foreman
Greensman
Foreman
Foreman
Foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Men's cost supv
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus software
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Utility sd
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Foley
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Processed sd eff
Apprentice sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff prod at
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up created by
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Scr cont
DeLorean time travel consultant
DeLorean const coord
Post prod supv
DGA trainee
Asst prod coord
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Loc mgr
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Transportation mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt/Picture cars
Craft service
Animal handler
Animal handler
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Zemeckis
Asst to Mr. Canton
Asst to Mr. Gale
Asst to Mr. Spielberg
Asst to Mr. Marshall
Asst to Ms. Kennedy
Asst to Mr. Repola
Prod asst
First aid
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Guitar teacher
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Power of Love," performed by Huey Lewis and The News, courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Inc., written by Huey Lewis and Chris Hayes, published by Hulex Music, administered by Red Admiral Music, Inc.
"Back in Time," performed by Huey Lewis and The News, courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Inc., written by Huey Lewis and Chris Hayes, published by Hulex Music, administered by Red Admiral Music, Inc.
"Heaven Is One Step Away," performed by Eric Clapton, written by Eric Patrick Clapton, produced by Phil Collins, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
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SONGS
"The Power of Love," performed by Huey Lewis and The News, courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Inc., written by Huey Lewis and Chris Hayes, published by Hulex Music, administered by Red Admiral Music, Inc.
"Back in Time," performed by Huey Lewis and The News, courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Inc., written by Huey Lewis and Chris Hayes, published by Hulex Music, administered by Red Admiral Music, Inc.
"Heaven Is One Step Away," performed by Eric Clapton, written by Eric Patrick Clapton, produced by Phil Collins, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Time Bomb Town," written and performed by Lindsey Buckingham, produced by Lindsey Buckingham and Richard Dashut, courtesy of Elektra Records
"Mr. Sandman," performed by Four Aces, written by F.D. Ballard, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"The Ballad of Davy Crockett," performed by Fess Parker, written by Tom Blackburn, courtesy of Disneyland-Vista Records
"The Wallflower (Dance with Me Henry)," performed by Etta James, written by Hank Ballard, Etta James and Johnny Otis, produced by Maxwell Davis, courtesy of Kent Records
"Night Train," performed by Marvin Berry and The Starlighters, written by Jimmy Forrest and Oscar Washington, produced by Bones Howe
"Pledging My Love," performed by Johnny Ace, written by Don D. Robey and Ferdinand Washington, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)," performed by Marvin Berry and The Starlighters, written by Jesse L. Belvin, Gaynel Hodge and Curtis Edward Williams, produced by Bones Howe
"Johnny B. Goode," performed by Marty McFly with the Starlighters, written by Chuck Berry, produced by Bones Howe.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
3 July 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 3 July 1985
Production Date:
26 November 1984--26 April 1985 in Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 October 1985
Copyright Number:
PA266708
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Dolby Stereo™® in selected theatres
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Lenses
Panaflex® camera and lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
116
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27831
SYNOPSIS

On October 26, 1985, Marty McFly receives a call from his friend, Dr. “Doc” Emmett Brown, a scientist and inventor, instructing Marty to meet him at the Twin Pines Mall that night at 1:15am. At Hill Valley High School, Marty auditions for a Battle of the Bands, but is rejected after the judges deem his music too loud. Marty’s girlfriend, Jennifer Parker, gives him a pep talk after school, but they are interrupted by an older woman handing out pamphlets to protest the replacement of the town’s broken clock tower; the tower, which was struck by lightning in 1955, has become a landmark, but the mayor has plans to replace it with a working clock. At home, Marty finds his father George in the living room with his boss, Biff Tannen, who has just wrecked George’s car. Unapologetic, Biff commands George to work overnight. At dinner, Marty’s mother Lorraine expresses her disapproval of Marty’s girlfriend after hearing that Jennifer left two phone messages for Marty. Marty’s older sister, Linda, asks how she will ever meet a boy under Lorraine’s strict rules of decorum, and Lorraine promises that it will “just happen,” recalling how she met George as a teenager after her father, Sam Baines, ran him over with a car. Lorraine describes the night she took George to the “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance and the moment they first kissed on the dance floor. That night, Marty meets Doc at the Twin Pines Mall and films him with a video camera as Doc presents the greatest experiment of his life, a car that has been rigged to travel through time. To demonstrate the car’s capabilities, Doc straps his dog, ... +


On October 26, 1985, Marty McFly receives a call from his friend, Dr. “Doc” Emmett Brown, a scientist and inventor, instructing Marty to meet him at the Twin Pines Mall that night at 1:15am. At Hill Valley High School, Marty auditions for a Battle of the Bands, but is rejected after the judges deem his music too loud. Marty’s girlfriend, Jennifer Parker, gives him a pep talk after school, but they are interrupted by an older woman handing out pamphlets to protest the replacement of the town’s broken clock tower; the tower, which was struck by lightning in 1955, has become a landmark, but the mayor has plans to replace it with a working clock. At home, Marty finds his father George in the living room with his boss, Biff Tannen, who has just wrecked George’s car. Unapologetic, Biff commands George to work overnight. At dinner, Marty’s mother Lorraine expresses her disapproval of Marty’s girlfriend after hearing that Jennifer left two phone messages for Marty. Marty’s older sister, Linda, asks how she will ever meet a boy under Lorraine’s strict rules of decorum, and Lorraine promises that it will “just happen,” recalling how she met George as a teenager after her father, Sam Baines, ran him over with a car. Lorraine describes the night she took George to the “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance and the moment they first kissed on the dance floor. That night, Marty meets Doc at the Twin Pines Mall and films him with a video camera as Doc presents the greatest experiment of his life, a car that has been rigged to travel through time. To demonstrate the car’s capabilities, Doc straps his dog, Einstein, into the driver’s seat and uses a remote control to start the car’s engine; as the vehicle speeds across the parking lot and reaches eighty-eight miles per hour, it disappears, leaving two trails of fire in its wake. Soon after, the car reappears, covered in ice, with Einstein safe inside. Doc checks a watch around Einstein’s neck and confirms that it is now one minute behind as he sent the dog one minute into the future, but due to the nature of the machine, the dog arrived at the destination instantaneously. Doc shows Marty how to set a “destination time,” using the date November 5, 1955 as an example and explaining that it was the day he invented the “flux capacitor,” a device inside the car that makes time travel possible. Doc confesses to stealing plutonium from a group of Libyan nationalists, since the machine requires plutonium for fuel. Marty continues filming as Doc prepares for his first voyage, but the Libyan nationalists appear and shoot Doc, killing him. Fleeing the Libyans, Marty steals into the time machine, and when he reaches eighty-eight miles per hour, he travels back to the last destination time set: November 5, 1955. Upon arrival, the time machine runs out of fuel, and Marty hides it behind a billboard. Walking into town, Marty marvels at 1950s automobiles and storefronts. At a diner, Marty orders a drink, and Biff, now a teenager, barges in, yelling for “McFly.” Marty responds, but realizes Biff is talking to his father, George, the teenager sitting beside him at the counter. When Biff becomes aggressive with George, Marty stares, stunned to see his father as a young man. Marty follows George outside the diner and, later, sees him perched in a tree, peeping through binoculars at a teenaged Lorraine. George falls from the tree and is nearly hit by a car, but Marty pushes him out of the way and gets hit instead. The driver, Lorraine’s father, Sam, rescues Marty and takes him inside. That night, Marty wakes up to find young Lorraine tending to him. Marty joins the Baines family for dinner and meets his grandmother, Stella, along with his aunt and uncles, who are now children. When Stella asks if she can call Marty’s parents, he lies that they are out of town, and Lorraine flirtatiously squeezes his leg under the table. Disturbed, Marty leaves, rushing to Doc’s house. There, Marty informs a younger Doc that he has traveled to 1955 in a machine built by Doc thirty years in the future. To prove his story, Marty leads Doc to the vehicle and shows him the flux capacitor, the same device that young Doc conceived and sketched earlier that day. When Doc learns that plutonium is required to run the vehicle, he tells Marty they won’t be able to restart the machine, saying that the only comparable power source would be a bolt of lightning. At that, Marty produces the pamphlet he was given back in 1985 describing the effort to preserve the town’s clock tower. The pamphlet states that the tower was struck at 10:04pm the following Saturday in 1955, and Doc and Marty make plans to harness the lightning for fuel. Doc asks if Marty has interacted with anyone else in 1955, and Marty admits that he has met both his parents. Requesting to see a family photograph from Marty’s wallet, Doc discovers that Marty’s brother, Dave, has almost disappeared, suggesting that Marty’s interference has changed the course of his family history. Convinced that Marty ruined Lorraine’s chances of meeting George when he saved him from being hit by Sam’s car, Doc orders Marty to stay by George’s side to ensure that he takes Lorraine to the “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance the next night. At the school cafeteria, George tells Marty about the science fiction stories he writes, and, later, Marty sneaks into George’s bedroom dressed as an extraterrestrial named “Darth Vader.” Threatening to melt George’s brain, Marty convinces him to ask Lorraine on a date. The next day, Biff bullies George when he tries to talk to Lorraine at the diner, and Marty punches Biff, inadvertently drawing attention to himself. Outside the diner, Marty uses a makeshift skateboard to escape Biff’s gang, and after sending Biff’s car into a manure truck, Marty further impresses Lorraine. At his home, Doc presents Marty with a plan to fuel the time machine by running a cable from the clock tower to the street. The time machine will be rigged with a pole to make contact with the cable, jolting the vehicle with enough power from the lightning bolt to travel back to 1985. Lorraine arrives at Doc’s house and asks Marty to the dance. Although Marty suggests she go with George, Lorraine says she wants a strong man like Marty. Later, Marty strategizes with George, saying he will make take advantage of Lorraine before the dance so that George can step in and save her. On the night of the dance, Marty writes a letter to Doc alerting him that he will be shot on the night of October 26, 1985. He slips the letter into Doc’s coat and, later, drives Lorraine to the dance. Parked outside the high school, Lorraine kisses Marty, but stops herself when she has a strange feeling. Biff opens the door and pulls Marty out of the car, handing him over to his gang. Biff then moves inside the car, forcing himself onto Lorraine. George arrives, thinking he’s interrupting Marty and Lorraine, but finds Biff instead. Lorraine begs for George’s help, and though Biff easily overpowers him, George becomes irate and retaliates, knocking Biff to the ground. As Lorraine takes George’s hand, Marty follows them inside to make sure they kiss on the dance floor, sealing their fate as his future parents; however, the band has stopped playing after losing a guitar player, so Marty picks up the guitar to keep the dance going. Checking his family photo, Marty sees that his brother and sister have both vanished, and his face is disappearing. Marty loses the ability to play guitar, but when George kisses Lorraine, Marty revives. Just before 10:04pm, Marty meets Doc in town and Doc sets Marty’s destination time to the minute he left 1985. Doc finds the letter Marty left and becomes angry, ripping it up and saying he doesn’t want to know what happens in the future; meanwhile, a cable breaks and Doc must fix it at the top of the tower. With the pole affixed to the time machine, Marty sets his destination time to ten minutes before he left 1985, hoping to save Doc from the Libyans. Doc reconnects the cable, the time machine gets powered by the lightning and Marty successfully drives into the future. When he arrives back in 1985, Marty witnesses Doc being shot by the Libyans as the previous version of Marty escapes in the time machine. Surprisingly still alive, though, Doc shows Marty his bulletproof vest and presents the reconstructed letter that Marty wrote him in 1955, proving that Marty’s warning saved his life. Doc says goodbye to Marty before traveling thirty years into the future. In the morning, Marty discovers that his home is better furnished and that his brother and sister are more successful than when he last saw them; moreover, Lorraine and George are surprisingly well-dressed and flirtatious. Outside, Biff waxes George’s luxury car as copies of George’s first science fiction novel arrive in the mail. Jennifer arrives and greets Marty with a kiss, but they are interrupted when Doc returns in the time machine. Doc insists that Marty and Jennifer join him, as their future children are in danger, and the three take off in the time machine, heading back to the future.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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