That's Entertainment, Part 2 (1976)

G | 126 mins | Documentary | 16 May 1976

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HISTORY

       The 12 Aug 1974 HR announced that producer Saul Chaplin began work on That’s Entertainment, Too! at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (M-G-M). Chaplin and M-G-M senior vice president/worldwide head of production Daniel Melnick promised that the film would contain several musical sequences never before seen by the public. An article in the 1 May 1975 LAT stated that the documentary would include the music of songwriter Irving Berlin, unlike its predecessor, That’s Entertainment! (1974, see entry), for which Berlin refused to license his songs. Following the success of the earlier film, Berlin gladly changed his mind. A release was planned for Christmas 1975 or summer 1976.
       A news item in the 7 Jul 1975 HR announced the completion of filming at M-G-M in Culver City, CA, before the production relocated to Paris over the 4 Jul 1975 weekend. The 28 Jul 1975 Newsweek reported actor Gene Kelly’s visit to Paris, France, to film sequences for That’s Entertainment, Too! Locations included Montmartre, L’Etoile, and the Trocadero.
       According to the 2 Jan 1976 HR, American Federation of Musicians (AFM) Local 47 in Los Angeles, CA, came to an agreement with M-G-M to pay royalties to musicians, or the heirs of musicians, who performed the music used in That’s Entertainment! and its upcoming sequel. The union estimated royalty payments of $150,000, which would encompass theatrical and television performances, and soundtrack recording sales.
       The 4 Feb 1976 HR announced the film’s official release title as That’s Entertainment, Part 2. ... More Less

       The 12 Aug 1974 HR announced that producer Saul Chaplin began work on That’s Entertainment, Too! at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (M-G-M). Chaplin and M-G-M senior vice president/worldwide head of production Daniel Melnick promised that the film would contain several musical sequences never before seen by the public. An article in the 1 May 1975 LAT stated that the documentary would include the music of songwriter Irving Berlin, unlike its predecessor, That’s Entertainment! (1974, see entry), for which Berlin refused to license his songs. Following the success of the earlier film, Berlin gladly changed his mind. A release was planned for Christmas 1975 or summer 1976.
       A news item in the 7 Jul 1975 HR announced the completion of filming at M-G-M in Culver City, CA, before the production relocated to Paris over the 4 Jul 1975 weekend. The 28 Jul 1975 Newsweek reported actor Gene Kelly’s visit to Paris, France, to film sequences for That’s Entertainment, Too! Locations included Montmartre, L’Etoile, and the Trocadero.
       According to the 2 Jan 1976 HR, American Federation of Musicians (AFM) Local 47 in Los Angeles, CA, came to an agreement with M-G-M to pay royalties to musicians, or the heirs of musicians, who performed the music used in That’s Entertainment! and its upcoming sequel. The union estimated royalty payments of $150,000, which would encompass theatrical and television performances, and soundtrack recording sales.
       The 4 Feb 1976 HR announced the film’s official release title as That’s Entertainment, Part 2. Two weeks later, the 18 Feb 1976 Var reported that The Mike Douglas Show, (1961 – 1982, Group W Productions) a syndicated television talk show, focused six episodes on the upcoming release, airing 16 Feb 1976 to 23 Feb 1976, with stars Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly as co-hosts. The final two episodes were videotaped at M-G-M Studios, with appearances by producers Chaplin and Melnick, as well as stars from past M-G-M productions.
       According to the 5 May 1976 DV, That’s Entertainment, Part 2 premiered at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City, 10 May 1976, as a gala benefit for the Film Society of Lincoln Center. In attendance were stars Astaire and Kelly, along with actors Cary Grant, Marge Champion, Cyd Charisse, Nanette Fabray, Karthryn Grayson, Donald O’Connor, Bobby Van, Johnny Weissmuller, Leslie Caron, and Georges Guetary, producers Chaplin and Melnick, and studio executives Frank E. Rosenfelt and Kirk Kerkorian. The entourage also attended the film’s opening of the 1976 Cannes Film Festival in France 13 May 1976, before returning to Los Angeles for a 19 May 1976 screening event at the Cinerama Dome. As reported in the 24 May 1976 Box, the screening benefitted the Opera Guild of Southern California. The film opened in Los Angeles the following day, 20 May 1976, but had previously been released 16 May 1976 in New York City.
       The 7 Jun 1976 DV announced M-G-M’s intention to remove two musical numbers from the film before its 18 Jun 1976 general release, along with an overture that precedes opening credits. The numbers included “Lonesome Polecat” from the film, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954, see entry), and “Concerto In F” from An American in Paris (1951, see entry). The sequences were removed because they were believed to “slow down the pace of the film.” A letter appeared in the 28 Nov 1976 LAT decrying the removal of these sequences, and the elimination of seven other musical numbers from a later edition.
       Actress Esther Williams filed a $1 million lawsuit against M-G-M for “breach of contract and invasion of privacy,” as reported in the 21 Sep 1976 HR. She claimed that M-G-M used footage of her in both That’s Entertainment! documentaries without her permission, which violated a 1951 agreement between the two parties. Although a 1954 revision of the agreement “gives M-G-M exclusive rights to all proceeds” from exhibition of Williams’s films, the actress countered that this did not allow the defendant to place those sequences “in an entirely different picture without consulting her or sharing the profits of its release.” The outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined.
       Reviews were generally positive. The 2 Aug 1976 Box announced the film’s receipt of its Jun 1976 Blue Ribbon Award, and the 16 May 1976 LAT called it “a superrich dessert.” However, Pauline Kael, in the 11 Oct 1976 New Yorker, described the film as "the Gene Kelly Memorial Service, conducted by Gene Kelly."
      End credit include the following written statements: “The special style and content of the musical sequences were created by these enormously gifted individuals: Jeff Alexander, Robert Alton, Busby Berkeley, Irving Berlin, Ralph Blane, Nicholas Brodszky, Nacio Herb Brown, Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin, Jack Cole, Betty Comden, Bobby Connolly, Jack Cummings, Gene De Paul, B. G. De Sylva, Adolph Deutsch, Helen Deutsch, Howard Dietz, Stanley Donen, Jack Donohue, Carmen Dragon, Vernon Duke, Jimmy Durante, Roger Edens, Gus Edwards, Percy Faith, Ted Fetter, Arthur Freed, George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, E. Ray Goetz, Dave Gould, Adolph Green, Johnny Green, Oscar Hammerstein II, Otto Harbach, Lorenz Hart, Lennie Hayton, Bert Kalmar, Bronislau Kaper, Jerome Kern, Michael Kidd, John Latouche, Sammy Lee, Franz Lehar, Robert Z. Leonard, Alan Jay Lerner, Mervyn LeRoy, Edgar Leslie, Frederick Loewe, Rouben Mamoulian, Hugh Martin, Johnny Mercer, George W. Meyer, Vincente Minnelli, Alfred Newman, Hermes Pan, Joe Pasternak, Cole Porter, Andre Previn, Leo Robin, Richard Rodgers, Sigmund Romberg, Harry Ruby, Conrad Salinger, Arthur Schwartz, George Sidney, Sol C. Siegel, Georgie Stoll, Axel Stordahl, Herbert Stothart, Johann Strauss, Jule Styne, Norman Taurog, Kay Thompson, Richard Thorpe, James Van Heusen, Charles Walters, Harry Warren, George Wells;” “The non-musical sequences represent outstanding contributions by: Robert Arthur, S. N. Behrman, Pandro S. Berman, Frank Borzage, Charles Brackett, Lou Breslow, Harold S. Bucquet, Hugo Butler, John W. Considine, Jr., Jack Conway, George Cukor, Jacques Deval, Julien Duvivier, Howard Estabrook, James A. Fitzpatrick, Victor Fleming, Sidney Franklin, Jules Furthman, Tay Garnett, Frances Goodrich, Leon Gordon, Ruth Gordon, Martin A. Gosch, Edmund Goulding, Albert Hackett, Samuel Hoffenstein, Robert Hopkins, Sidney Howard, Bernard H. Hyman, Garson Kanin, George S. Kaufman, Arthur Kober, Charles Lederer, W. P. Lipscomb, Anita Loos, Ernst Lubitsch, John Lee Mahin, Herman J. Mankiewicz, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Samuel Marx, James K. McGuiness, John Meehan, Ivor Novello, George Oppenheimer, Nat Perrin, Robert Pirosh, Gottfried Reinhardt, Walter Reisch, Allen Rivkin, Morrie Ryskind, Victor Saville, Dore Schary, George Seaton, David O. Selznick, Sidney Sheldon, S. Sylvan Simon, Donald Ogden Stewart, Hunt Stromberg, W. S. Van Dyke, Salka Viertel, Lawrence Weingarten, Fred M. Wilcox, Billy Wilder, P. J. Wolfson, Sam Wood, Sam Zimbalist.”
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 May 1976
p. 4.
Box Office
2 Aug 1976.
p. 9.
Daily Variety
7 May 1975.
---
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1976.
---
Daily Variety
22 Apr 1976.
---
Daily Variety
5 May 1976.
---
Daily Variety
11 May 1976.
---
Daily Variety
12 May 1976.
---
Daily Variety
14 May 1976.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jul 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1976
p. 3,7.
Hollywood Reporter
11 May 1976
p. 14, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1976.
---
LAHExam
5 May 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 May 1975
Part IV, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
6 May 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 May 1976
p. 1, 42, 50, 51.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1976
Part IV, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
15 Jun 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Jun 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Nov 1976.
---
New York Times
30 May 1976
p. 11.
New Yorker
11 Oct 1976.
---
Newsweek
28 Jul 1975.
---
Variety
18 Feb 1976.
---
Variety
5 May 1976
p. 18.
Variety
19 May 1976.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Abbot & Costello:
[and]
Laurel & Hardy:
[and]
The Marx Brothers:
[and]
Marge & Gower Champion:
Eddie "Rochester" Anderson
New seqs, Special appearance
Fernand Gravet
[and]
George Mathews
Charles Buchinski
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
MGM presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
New seqs, Dir
New seqs, Prod mgr
New seqs, Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Narration wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
New seqs, Dir of photog
2d cam asst
Still man
Gaffer
Best boy
Head grip
2d grip
1st crane op
2d crane op
Film processing
Panavision
ART DIRECTOR
New seqs, Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Contributing film ed
Contributing film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
New seqs, Prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
New seqs, Ward for Mr. Astaire and Mr. Kelly
Men`s cost
Men`s cost
MUSIC
New seqs, Mus arr and cond
New seqs, Spec lyrics
New seqs, Spec lyrics
SOUND
New seqs, Sd
Sd re-rec mixer
Sd re-rec mixer
Boom op
Playback op
VISUAL EFFECTS
New seqs, Main credit titles
Opt supv
DANCE
Asst choreog
Asst choreog
Piano accompanist
MAKEUP
New seqs, Makeup
New seqs, Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
New seqs, Scr supv
Secy to prods
Craft serviceman
Cue cards
Estimator
ANIMATION
COLOR PERSONNEL
New seqs, [Col by]
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
That's Entertainment, Too!
Release Date:
16 May 1976
Premiere Information:
New York City premiere: 10 May 1976 at the Ziegfeld Theatre
New York opening: 16 May 1976
Los Angeles opening: 20 May 1976
Production Date:
completed Julyy 1975
Copyright Claimant:
Turner Entertainment Company
Copyright Date:
16 May 1976
Copyright Number:
LP46474
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Black and White
Lenses
Camera and lenses by Panavision ®
Duration(in mins):
126
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24438
SYNOPSIS

The film is a compilation of segments from assorted releases by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, including: Singin' in the Rain (1952), The Bandwagon (1953), Ivanhoe (1953), Annie Get Your Gun (1950), For Me and My Gal (1942), Two-Faced Woman (1941), Lili (1953), The Pirate (1948), David Copperfield (1935), A Night at the Opera (1935), Kiss Me Kate (1953), Silk Stockings (1957), Words and Music (1948), Till the Clouds Roll By (1947), Easter Parade (1948), Going Hollywood (1933), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Born to Dance (1936), New Moon (1940), Girl Crazy (1943), The Song Writers' Revue (1929), Three Little Words (1950), The Great Waltz (1938), Meet Me in St. Louis (1945), Love Me or Leave Me ... +


The film is a compilation of segments from assorted releases by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, including: Singin' in the Rain (1952), The Bandwagon (1953), Ivanhoe (1953), Annie Get Your Gun (1950), For Me and My Gal (1942), Two-Faced Woman (1941), Lili (1953), The Pirate (1948), David Copperfield (1935), A Night at the Opera (1935), Kiss Me Kate (1953), Silk Stockings (1957), Words and Music (1948), Till the Clouds Roll By (1947), Easter Parade (1948), Going Hollywood (1933), Cabin in the Sky (1943), Born to Dance (1936), New Moon (1940), Girl Crazy (1943), The Song Writers' Revue (1929), Three Little Words (1950), The Great Waltz (1938), Meet Me in St. Louis (1945), Love Me or Leave Me (1955), An American in Paris (1951), Anchors Aweigh (1945), It Happened in Brooklyn (1947), High Society (1955), Some Came Running (1959), Can-Can (1960), Grand Hotel (1932), Ninotchka (1939), Dinner at Eight (1934), Tarzan and His Mate (1934), A Day at the Races (1937), Go West (1940), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), Lassie Come Home (1943), Gone With the Wind (1940), The Merry Widow (1934), Invitation to the Dance (1956), Small Town Girl (1953), Boys Town (1938), San Francisco (1936), The Philadelphia Story (1941), Pat and Mike (1952), Keeper of the Flame (1942), Woman of the Year (1942), Adam's Rib (1949), It's Always Fair Weather (1955), Gigi (1958), and The Barkleys of Broadway (1949). +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.