Audrey Rose (1977)

PG | 115 mins | Drama, Horror | April 1977

Director:

Robert Wise

Cinematographer:

Victor J. Kemper

Editor:

Carl Kress

Production Designer:

Harry Horner

Production Company:

Sterobcar Productions
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HISTORY

       An 18 Jul 1975 DV news item announced that Audrey Rose, Frank De Felitta’s soon-to-be-published novel, would be the second project of producer Joe Wizan’s four-picture deal with United Artists Corp.
       According to the 16 Aug 1976 Box, Audrey Rose began filming in Hollywood, CA, on 26 Jul 1976, with a production budget of $4 million, as reported by the Nov 1977 issue of Films & Filming. The film was still in production in late September on a million-dollar set on United Artists’ Culver City lot, said the 23 Sep 1976 T.G.I.F Casting News.
       In their profile on director Robert Wise, the Nov 1977 issue of Films & Filming reported that principal photography for Audrey Rose had moved from Hollywood to the streets of Manhattan in New York City. One location was the "Ethical Culture School on West 65th Street." Another was an apartment building at 1 West 67th Street, just off Central Park West. Wise said that he found the film’s star, first-time actress Susan Swift, in Austin, Texas after a “massive search” in Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, and several other cities.
       According to Films & Filming, producers hired doctor Jean Holroyd, Ph.D., from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Psychiatry Department to supervise the film’s crucial hypnosis scene.
      A title card with the following quote appears prior to the end credits: "'There is no end. For the soul there is never birth nor death. Nor, having once been, does it ever cease to be. It is unborn, eternal, ever-existing, undying and primeval...' ... More Less

       An 18 Jul 1975 DV news item announced that Audrey Rose, Frank De Felitta’s soon-to-be-published novel, would be the second project of producer Joe Wizan’s four-picture deal with United Artists Corp.
       According to the 16 Aug 1976 Box, Audrey Rose began filming in Hollywood, CA, on 26 Jul 1976, with a production budget of $4 million, as reported by the Nov 1977 issue of Films & Filming. The film was still in production in late September on a million-dollar set on United Artists’ Culver City lot, said the 23 Sep 1976 T.G.I.F Casting News.
       In their profile on director Robert Wise, the Nov 1977 issue of Films & Filming reported that principal photography for Audrey Rose had moved from Hollywood to the streets of Manhattan in New York City. One location was the "Ethical Culture School on West 65th Street." Another was an apartment building at 1 West 67th Street, just off Central Park West. Wise said that he found the film’s star, first-time actress Susan Swift, in Austin, Texas after a “massive search” in Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, and several other cities.
       According to Films & Filming, producers hired doctor Jean Holroyd, Ph.D., from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Psychiatry Department to supervise the film’s crucial hypnosis scene.
      A title card with the following quote appears prior to the end credits: "'There is no end. For the soul there is never birth nor death. Nor, having once been, does it ever cease to be. It is unborn, eternal, ever-existing, undying and primeval...' - The Bhagavad Gita."
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Aug 1976.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1975.
---
Films and Filming
Nov 1977
pp. 18-22.
Hollywood Reporter
18 July 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1977
p. 3, 10.
T.G.I.F. Casting News
23 Sep 1976.
---
Variety
6 Apr 1977
p. 26.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Robert Wise production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
Scr, from his novel
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Head elec
Key grip
Stills
Lab processing
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Best boy
Elec op
Elec op
Best boy
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Const co-ord
Asst prop master
Leadman
Set des
Const foreman
Leadman
COSTUMES
Women`s cost
Men`s cost
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Orch
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair dresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Consultation on hypnosis
Court tech adv
Asst to the prods
Prod co-ord
Exec secy to the dir
Prod accountant
Payroll
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
A.F.I. academy intern
A.F.I. academy intern
Unit pub
Craft service
Welfare worker
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Audrey Rose by Frank De Felitta (New York, 1975).
DETAILS
Release Date:
April 1977
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 6 April 1977
Production Date:
began 26 July 1976
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 March 1977
Copyright Number:
LP47350
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Release prints by Deluxe General
Duration(in mins):
115
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24794
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a Pennsylvania turnpike a car smashes head-on into another car driven by a woman with a little girl in the back seat. Eleven years later, as advertising executive Bill Templeton, his wife Janice and their eleven-year-old daughter, Ivy, spend the day in Manhattan’s Central Park, Janice notices a scruffy man with a beard watching them, and Janice later sees the same man when she picks up Ivy at school. That evening, she and Bill entertain friends in their living room, which has a wooden ceiling embedded with six classic Raphael-style paintings. Janice hears Ivy crying upstairs and goes up to see what’s wrong. Ivy awakes from a nightmare but can’t remember it. Janice later tells Bill about the stranger she saw, but Bill has already seen the man following him on the bus and standing outside Ivy’s school. Bill complains to the police, but the stranger hasn’t physically bothered anyone. Later, Bill thinks he sees the man’s fleeting reflection in the security mirror at a grocery store. When Bill gets home, Ivy looks in his shopping bag and finds a purse designed with the same art that’s on their ceiling. Ivy’s name is stitched on it. Afterward, when Bill tells Janice the man must have sneaked the purse into his bag, she becomes afraid and says the man called that morning because Ivy stayed home from school. The next morning, a letter arrives containing a clipping from Who’s Who that describes a Pittsburgh steel executive named ... +


On a Pennsylvania turnpike a car smashes head-on into another car driven by a woman with a little girl in the back seat. Eleven years later, as advertising executive Bill Templeton, his wife Janice and their eleven-year-old daughter, Ivy, spend the day in Manhattan’s Central Park, Janice notices a scruffy man with a beard watching them, and Janice later sees the same man when she picks up Ivy at school. That evening, she and Bill entertain friends in their living room, which has a wooden ceiling embedded with six classic Raphael-style paintings. Janice hears Ivy crying upstairs and goes up to see what’s wrong. Ivy awakes from a nightmare but can’t remember it. Janice later tells Bill about the stranger she saw, but Bill has already seen the man following him on the bus and standing outside Ivy’s school. Bill complains to the police, but the stranger hasn’t physically bothered anyone. Later, Bill thinks he sees the man’s fleeting reflection in the security mirror at a grocery store. When Bill gets home, Ivy looks in his shopping bag and finds a purse designed with the same art that’s on their ceiling. Ivy’s name is stitched on it. Afterward, when Bill tells Janice the man must have sneaked the purse into his bag, she becomes afraid and says the man called that morning because Ivy stayed home from school. The next morning, a letter arrives containing a clipping from Who’s Who that describes a Pittsburgh steel executive named Elliot Suggins, born in London, with a daughter named Audrey Rose. That afternoon Janice is late picking up Ivy at school, and by the time she arrives the children have gone. She sees a figure of a girl in a rain hat running down the block, follows her through an alley, but loses her. Suddenly the stranger is at Janice’s elbow, informing her that Ivy is safe at home. That evening the man phones Janice and Bill, identifies himself as Elliot Hoover and says he wants to meet them at a restaurant around the corner. At the restaurant the stranger is now well-dressed and clean-shaven. Elliot explains that it took him a long time to prepare for this moment. Eleven years earlier his wife and daughter, Audrey Rose, were killed in an accident. Not long afterward, he met a clairvoyant who told him his daughter was still alive. Years later, another clairvoyant in New York, who knew many intimate details, said the same thing, and described Audrey Rose’s home as an apartment with paintings set into the ceiling. And then, says Elliot, the moment he saw Ivy he recognized all the subtle qualities of Audrey Rose. At that moment, Ivy’s babysitter calls the restaurant to tell them that Ivy is having nightmares. As the couple hurries out, Bill tells Elliot to leave them alone. In Ivy’s bedroom they find their daughter, with her eyes open, calling over and over for daddy, but she suddenly wakes up and smiles. The next day, Bill consults with his lawyer, Russ Rothman. Since Bill thinks Elliot is a shakedown artist, Russ suggests that he invite Elliot to the apartment for a talk as Russ hides in another room to serve as a witness. Bill reluctantly agrees. When Elliot arrives, he’s amazed by the paintings, because they are just as the clairvoyant described them. He says it took him many years to believe what the clairvoyants told him. First he abandoned his professional life and lived in India, where he embraced the Hindu religion and its tenet of reincarnation, the transmigration of souls from one body to another. Elliot says he was able to find Ivy because she was born only two minutes after Audrey Rose died. At that moment, Ivy begins screaming and thrashing upstairs. As she pushes her palms against a window, she reacts as if the glass were hot. The only thing that finally calms her down is Elliot intoning the name Audrey Rose, over and over, and telling her, “It’s me, it’s daddy.” Ivy opens her eyes and runs into Elliot’s arms. He tries to explain to Bill and Janice that Audrey Rose had been trapped in the car and couldn’t escape the flames. Enraged, Bill slugs Elliiot and orders him out of the apartment. Janice notices that Ivy’s hands are singed; Bill thinks she burned them on the radiator, but Janice says she saw Ivy’s hands burn against the cold window. That night, Bill is out with his agency clients when Janice hears Ivy screaming. She runs into her daughter’s bedroom in time to see the girl trying to break through a window. At that moment, the doorman calls to say Mr. Hoover is in the lobby, and in desperation Janice consents to him coming up to the apartment. Again, by calling Ivy "Audrey Rose" and referring to himself as "Daddy," Elliot calms her down. He tells Janice that Ivy has a tormented soul inside her. Ivy is in mortal danger, he says, because Audrey Rose’s soul returned too soon, without preparation for taking a new body. He’s not talking about possession but reincarnation. Elliot insists that he only wants Janice’s understanding, so that he can help bring Audrey Rose’s soul back to health inside Ivy. Janice is convinced that Elliot is right, but when Bill gets home he tells her that she’s been brainwashed. Later that night, as Ivy begins screaming again, the doorbell rings. When Bill answers the door, Elliot is there, trying to get inside to help Ivy. The two men fight in the hallway. The moment Janice comes out to help Bill, Elliot runs into the apartment and locks the door. By the time Bill and Janice get back inside, with the help of the building superintendent and two policemen, both Elliot and Ivy have gone out the service door in the stairwell. The superintendent tells Bill and Janice that Mr. Hoover has sublet an apartment upstairs. They run up and find him there with Ivy, but Elliot refuses to open the door, and when the police ask if there’s a child in there, he says there is, and “she’s mine .” When Elliot relents, he is arrested for kidnapping. At Elliot’s trial, his lawyer, Brice Mack, tries to make the argument for reincarnation, as the case rests on whether the jury believes that the soul of Audrey Rose is now inside Ivy. One witness he calls is a Hindu scholar, Maharishi Gupta Pradesh, who explains explains Hindu theology and the teachings of the Bhagavad Gita. Another witness is a woman in a wheelchair who was the other driver eleven years earlier. She testifies that she saw Audrey Rose staring out the back seat window, screaming and calling for her daddy as the car went up in flames. That night, at Ivy’s parochial school, Ivy and her classmates dance around a bonfire during a St. Sylvester religious festival. A mother superior at an upstairs window becomes concerned when she sees Ivy staring into the flames. Then, as Ivy steps into the fire, the woman screams to the other nuns to stop her. Afterward, Ivy doesn’t remember anything. In the courtroom, Brice calls Janice to the witness stand. She admits that she has come to believe that Audrey Rose’s soul is in Ivy and that only Elliot can save her. The prosecutor requests a recess and gets Bill to consent to Ivy being hypnotized under strict medical conditions. Janice tries to stop it, but Ivy says she wants to find out what is wrong with her. The jury is gathered to watch the session behind a one-way mirror, and other parties, including Bill, Janice and Elliot, watch on a video monitor. Psychiatrist Dr. Steven Lipscomb hypnotizes Ivy and takes her back through several birthday parties until they reach her babyhood. Ivy puts her thumb in her mouth. Then, as the doctor regresses Ivy into the womb, she curls into a fetal position. He takes her further back now, before Ivy existed. Ivy becomes blank. Who are you, Dr. Lipscomb asks, repeatedly. Ivy sees a road going by outside. She repeats “Mommy” until she sees another car coming toward her, and then she thrashes and screams and falls out of the chair. She leaps up and touches her hands against the mirror, feeling flames. On the other side of the mirror, Elliot shatters the glass with a chair. As Janice rushes into the room, Ivy is on the floor, unresponsive and being given oxygen. The doctors finally give up. The little girl is dead. Sometime later, Janice sends a letter to Elliot in India to tell him that she has come to realize that Ivy’s soul is free. She is glad that she let him take Ivy’s ashes to India and hopes that her soul will find happiness again someday. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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