One on One (1977)

PG | 98 mins | Drama | 1 July 1977

Director:

Lamont Johnson

Producer:

Martin Hornstein

Cinematographer:

Donald M. Morgan

Editor:

Robbe Roberts

Production Designer:

Sherman Loudermilk

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

End credits include the following written acknowledgement: “With special thanks to: Colorado State University, the City of Fort Collins and the State of Colorado.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Catch a Falling Star, a 16 Sep 1976 DV news item reported that Warner Bros., Inc., was making a basketball drama starring Robby Benson, who co-wrote the screenplay with his father, Jerry Segal. On 16 Feb 1977, Var referred to the film as One on One.
       The duo Seals & Crofts, who perform the music in the film, consists of James “Jim” Seals and Darrell “Dash” Crofts.
       According to a 20 Sep 1976 DV article, Carrie Fisher, Veronica Cartwright and Season Hubley screen-tested for roles in the film, and a 10 Nov 1976 DV news item announced the casting of Charles Fleischer. Fleischer is briefly glimpsed in an early scene set in a high school gymnasium, however, he is not included in the onscreen credits.
       On 22 Oct 1976, Box reported that the film began principal photography 9 Oct 1976 at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins, CO, and at The Burbank Studios, in Burbank, CA. According to the 14 Jun 1977 DV, producers chose Colorado State after being turned down by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Southern California (USC). Most of the basketball scenes and some exteriors were filmed at CSU’s Moby Arena as the setting for fictional Western University’s Los Angeles campus. A 25 Oct 1976 Box article explained that producers asked the 7,000 extras ... More Less

End credits include the following written acknowledgement: “With special thanks to: Colorado State University, the City of Fort Collins and the State of Colorado.”
       Referring to the picture by its working title, Catch a Falling Star, a 16 Sep 1976 DV news item reported that Warner Bros., Inc., was making a basketball drama starring Robby Benson, who co-wrote the screenplay with his father, Jerry Segal. On 16 Feb 1977, Var referred to the film as One on One.
       The duo Seals & Crofts, who perform the music in the film, consists of James “Jim” Seals and Darrell “Dash” Crofts.
       According to a 20 Sep 1976 DV article, Carrie Fisher, Veronica Cartwright and Season Hubley screen-tested for roles in the film, and a 10 Nov 1976 DV news item announced the casting of Charles Fleischer. Fleischer is briefly glimpsed in an early scene set in a high school gymnasium, however, he is not included in the onscreen credits.
       On 22 Oct 1976, Box reported that the film began principal photography 9 Oct 1976 at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins, CO, and at The Burbank Studios, in Burbank, CA. According to the 14 Jun 1977 DV, producers chose Colorado State after being turned down by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and the University of Southern California (USC). Most of the basketball scenes and some exteriors were filmed at CSU’s Moby Arena as the setting for fictional Western University’s Los Angeles campus. A 25 Oct 1976 Box article explained that producers asked the 7,000 extras used for the crowd scenes to hide their jackets and coats to onvey the warmer CA climate. A 27 Sep 1976 Box news item reported that filming in Fort Collins was expected to last three to four weeks and the film had a budget of less than $2 million. A 24 Nov 1976 DV article announced that principal photography was completed two days before planned.
       A 3 Jun 1977 DV story stated that producers planned previews in Cincinnati and Dayton, OH; Indianapolis, IN; Kansas City and St. Louis, MO; Louisville, KY; Baltimore, MD; and Washington, D.C., over the weekend of 3 Jul 1977. A 22 Jun 1977 LAHExam news item reported the film was previewed in the same cities, with the inclusion of Columbus, OH, rather than Louisville. Audience preview cards positively compared the film to Rocky (1976, see entry) with an overall 90% excellent rating.
       Many reviews also compared the film to Rocky, though not approvingly, with the 19 Sep 1977 Village Voice citing “the self-indulgent script of Benson (shades of Sylvester Stallone)” and calling One on One a “feathery fantasy.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
27 Sep 1976.
---
Box Office
22 Oct 1976.
---
Box Office
25 Oct 1976.
---
Box Office
20 Jun 1977.
---
Cue
3 Sep 1977.
---
Daily Variety
16 Sep 1976.
---
Daily Variety
20 Sep 1976.
---
Daily Variety
10 Nov 1976.
---
Daily Variety
24 Nov 1976.
---
Daily Variety
16 Feb 1977.
---
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1977.
---
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1977.
---
Films and Filming
May 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 1977
p. 2.
Independent Film Journal
24 Jun 1977.
---
Los Angeles Free Press
5 Aug 1977.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
4 Aug 1977.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
22 Jun 1977.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Aug 1977
p. 1.
New Times
16 Sep 1977.
---
New West
29 Aug 1977.
---
New York
12 Sep 1977.
---
New York Times
25 Aug 1977
p. 14.
Newsweek
5 Sep 1977.
---
Time
25 Jul 1977.
---
UCLA Summer Bruin
5 Aug 1977.
---
Variety
23 Feb 1977.
---
Variety
15 Jun 1977
p. 21.
Village Voice
19 Sep 1977
p. 53.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Lamont Johnson Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
Gaffer
Key grip
Stillman
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
2d grip
Projectionist
Dolly grip
Lamp op
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
2d prop man
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Men`s cost
2d ward man
Women`s cost
MUSIC
Lyrics
Songs performed by
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd eff ed
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc coord
Scr supv
Unit pub
Loc casting
Tech adv
Prod Services and equip provided by
Loc auditor
Prod secy
Secy to prod
Secy to dir
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Loc paymaster
Driver
Driver
Honeywagon driver
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Janet's Theme," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Picnic," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Flyin'," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
+
MUSIC
"Janet's Theme," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Picnic," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Flyin'," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Reflections," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Time Out," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Party," music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts
"The Basketball Game" music by Charles Fox, performed by Seals & Crofts.
+
SONGS
"My Fair Share (One On One Theme)," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"This Day Belongs To Me," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"John Wayne," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
+
SONGS
"My Fair Share (One On One Theme)," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"This Day Belongs To Me," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"John Wayne," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Love Conquers All," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Croft
"It'll Be All Right," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts
"Hustle," music by Charles Fox, lyrics by Paul Williams, performed by Seals & Crofts.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Catch a Falling Star
Release Date:
1 July 1977
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 3 August 1977
New York opening: 24 August 1977
Production Date:
9 October 1976--November 1976 at Fort Collins, CO
Burbank, CA
Hollywood, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers Entertainment, Inc.
Copyright Date:
29 June 1977
Copyright Number:
LP49131
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® equipment
Duration(in mins):
98
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Young Henry Steele practices basketball alone in his Colorado driveway as neighborhood kids play pickup soccer in the lot across the street. A few years later, he is a high school basketball sensation and receives a four-year, no-cut scholarship, and a brand new Datsun 280-Z sports car from Western University coach Moreland Smith. Upon graduating from high school, Henry drives to Los Angeles, California, for college. His car overheats when he reaches Hollywood and he picks up a pretty hitchhiker. She robs him of his cash by threatening to scream rape before giving him directions to a car dealer. When Henry reaches the Western University campus, Coach Smith initially doesn’t recognize him, but the female department secretary, B. J. Rudolph, sets Henry up at his dormitory and at his job watering the athletic fields, which have automatic sprinklers. As he leaves, she gropes him and makes a provocative statement. Later, Henry meets his roommate, Tom, who informs him of B. J.’s reputation for seducing athletes. Practice begins and the relatively short Henry is intimidated by the other players’ size. However, at the team’s media day, Coach Smith introduces Henry as a future star. Henry is allotted two tickets to every home game, which he is instructed to give to his alumnus “big brother,” Barry Brunz, who, in return, gives Henry $600. Henry is also assigned a tutor, Janet Hays, a senior who has a low opinion of student-athletes. As the team practices, Henry’s flashy style clashes with Coach Smith’s focus on fundamentals and Henry struggles to keep up. Meanwhile, Henry tries to convince Janet that he is not just another dumb athlete. Tom helps Henry buy new clothes and ... +


Young Henry Steele practices basketball alone in his Colorado driveway as neighborhood kids play pickup soccer in the lot across the street. A few years later, he is a high school basketball sensation and receives a four-year, no-cut scholarship, and a brand new Datsun 280-Z sports car from Western University coach Moreland Smith. Upon graduating from high school, Henry drives to Los Angeles, California, for college. His car overheats when he reaches Hollywood and he picks up a pretty hitchhiker. She robs him of his cash by threatening to scream rape before giving him directions to a car dealer. When Henry reaches the Western University campus, Coach Smith initially doesn’t recognize him, but the female department secretary, B. J. Rudolph, sets Henry up at his dormitory and at his job watering the athletic fields, which have automatic sprinklers. As he leaves, she gropes him and makes a provocative statement. Later, Henry meets his roommate, Tom, who informs him of B. J.’s reputation for seducing athletes. Practice begins and the relatively short Henry is intimidated by the other players’ size. However, at the team’s media day, Coach Smith introduces Henry as a future star. Henry is allotted two tickets to every home game, which he is instructed to give to his alumnus “big brother,” Barry Brunz, who, in return, gives Henry $600. Henry is also assigned a tutor, Janet Hays, a senior who has a low opinion of student-athletes. As the team practices, Henry’s flashy style clashes with Coach Smith’s focus on fundamentals and Henry struggles to keep up. Meanwhile, Henry tries to convince Janet that he is not just another dumb athlete. Tom helps Henry buy new clothes and takes him to a party. Tom and a football player arrange to have Henry drive an intoxicated B. J. home and she attempts to engage him sexually. They are pulled over by the police, but Henry convinces the officer that B.J. is his ill mother, and offers him tickets to an upcoming game against Notre Dame, so the officer lets him go. During a tutoring session with Janet, her boyfriend, Malcolm, a professor, belittles Henry’s intellect, but Janet defends her pupil and asks Malcolm to leave. On the court, Henry continues to disappoint Smith and Tom gives him an amphetamine to try and improve his performance. However, Henry acts strangely from the drug and Smith dismisses him from practice. Later, in their dormitory room, Henry rages at Tom for giving him the pill, so Tom gives him a sedative to help him sleep. The next day, Smith is tired of Henry’s perceived showboating, so he asks the boy to renounce his scholarship, but Henry refuses. Later, Janet tells Henry that the athletic department informed her that her services were no longer needed to tutor Henry, but she promises to help him whether she gets paid or not. When Henry picks up his paycheck from B. J., she tells him that he will not be included on the travel squad for road games and he has been fired from the job watering lawns. Later, he learns that Barry Brunz will no longer purchase his tickets and Henry is forced to take a job working overnight at a hotel, but continues to dress for home games and practice with the team, despite the coaches' attempts to break his spirit. A special one-on-one game between Henry and a much brawnier player leaves Henry battered and bloodied, and Smith orders Henry to run the stadium steps. Afterward, Henry stands up to the coach, announcing his refusal to quit. Later, Henry goes to Janet’s apartment and she is unnerved by his injuries. They kiss and she asks him to quit the hotel job and move in with her to focus on his studies. Under Janet’s tutelage, Henry earns high marks on his mid-term examination in history, avoiding the failing grade that Smith was counting on to void Henry’s scholarship. To celebrate, Henry and Janet picnic and make love, and Henry explains what playing sports means to him. Regaining his confidence, Henry works out on his own, lifting weights and spending extra time in the gymnasium. In a big game on national television, Western trails their opponent Tech at halftime and Smith berates the team for playing to the cameras. One Western starting guard, Jomo Wade, fouls out and another is injured, forcing Smith to put Henry into the game; however, he orders Henry to stay away from the ball. Western trails by five points with less than four minutes left to play, but when Henry takes control of the game, he gets his team to within one point with four seconds to go. Smith calls a play that excludes Henry, but a loose ball allows Henry to score the winning basket. The next day, Smith calls Henry into his office and admits he was wrong and admires Henry's fortitude. He tells Henry that he does not need to worry about being hassled about his scholarship any longer, but Henry smiles and rebukes the coach, knowing he can now play anywhere he wants. Later, outside the arena, Henry and Janet play a keep-away game with a group of children. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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