Disco 9000 (1978)

PG | Drama | 1 February 1978

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HISTORY

End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special thanks to: The Sammy Davis, Jr. Int’l. Fan Club; The Soul Train Dancers; Clifford Weinstein; Paintings By Anthony R. Quisenberry; Star Track Recording Studio; The Los Angeles National Cemetery, Veterans Administration; The Malibu Civic Center; Terry Woodford, Wishbone, Inc., Mussel Shoals, Alabama.”
       A 3 Nov 1976 DV news brief announced actor D’Urville Martin’s plans to direct and co-produce Disco 9000 as an independent feature in Los Angeles, CA. Although DV reported the production company as Lone Star Productions, credits list the film as a Long Star-Yellow Rose production.
       According to a 27 Apr 1978 DV article, the film’s producers made Disco 9000 under the Screen Actor’s Guild’s (SAG) “low-budget agreement” which permitted the production to pay its actors below minimum wage, or half of their negotiated salary, during production. Once the film went into distribution, the SAG agreement stipulated that the deferred salaries be paid in full. DV reported that repeated attempts by thirty performers to collect salaries had failed. SAG received an injunction from the Los Angeles Superior Court “forbidding further distribution of the film” and demanding Lone Star Productions to create a bank account designated for past due salaries. In addition to deferred salaries, Lone Star owed money for delinquent pension and welfare contributions, fines for late payments, and “violations of security provisions of the collective bargaining agreement.” The outcome of this dispute is ... More Less

End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Special thanks to: The Sammy Davis, Jr. Int’l. Fan Club; The Soul Train Dancers; Clifford Weinstein; Paintings By Anthony R. Quisenberry; Star Track Recording Studio; The Los Angeles National Cemetery, Veterans Administration; The Malibu Civic Center; Terry Woodford, Wishbone, Inc., Mussel Shoals, Alabama.”
       A 3 Nov 1976 DV news brief announced actor D’Urville Martin’s plans to direct and co-produce Disco 9000 as an independent feature in Los Angeles, CA. Although DV reported the production company as Lone Star Productions, credits list the film as a Long Star-Yellow Rose production.
       According to a 27 Apr 1978 DV article, the film’s producers made Disco 9000 under the Screen Actor’s Guild’s (SAG) “low-budget agreement” which permitted the production to pay its actors below minimum wage, or half of their negotiated salary, during production. Once the film went into distribution, the SAG agreement stipulated that the deferred salaries be paid in full. DV reported that repeated attempts by thirty performers to collect salaries had failed. SAG received an injunction from the Los Angeles Superior Court “forbidding further distribution of the film” and demanding Lone Star Productions to create a bank account designated for past due salaries. In addition to deferred salaries, Lone Star owed money for delinquent pension and welfare contributions, fines for late payments, and “violations of security provisions of the collective bargaining agreement.” The outcome of this dispute is undetermined.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1976.
---
Daily Variety
27 Apr 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Feb 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Feb 1978
p. 11.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
and guest starring
Johnnie Taylor
Musicians:
[and]
LA Shawn fashions by [model]:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Long Star & Yellow Rose presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
2d unit cam and aerial sequences
2nd unit asst cam
Best boy
Key grip
Grip
Generator man
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Property
COSTUMES
Ward
Ward designer
Fass's wardrobe selected by
Fass's wardrobe selected by
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus and lyrics by
Addl mus and lyrics by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Sd eff ed
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
Dubbing mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals by
Title design
MAKEUP
Makeup
Asst makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Asst to the prods
Asst to the prods
Asst to the prods
Asst to the prods
Casting coord
Scr supv
Dial coach
Pilot
Unit pub
Catering creativity
STAND INS
Stunt woman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"I Love You Woman," music by Johnnie Taylor
"It's Got To Be Strong," "Private: Do Not Disturb," "Ivey's League," music by Clayton Ivey, published by Song Tailor's Music, used by permission by Song Tailor's music.
SONGS
"Disco 9000," lyrics and music by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery
"Disco Lady," sung by Johnnie Taylor, produced by Don Davis, lyrics by Donald Davis, Harvey Scales and Al Vance, by permission from Groovesville Music Publishing, courtesy of Columbia Records
"Right Now," lyrics and musics by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery
+
SONGS
"Disco 9000," lyrics and music by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery
"Disco Lady," sung by Johnnie Taylor, produced by Don Davis, lyrics by Donald Davis, Harvey Scales and Al Vance, by permission from Groovesville Music Publishing, courtesy of Columbia Records
"Right Now," lyrics and musics by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery
"I Want To Love You," lyrics by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery, music by Johnnie Taylor
"[Just A] Happy Song," lyrics by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery, music by Johnnie Taylor
"I Don't Know What I'll Do Without You," lyrics and music by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery
"God Is Standing By," lyrics and music by Johnnie Taylor, by permission of Kags Music Publishing
"Toot Your Flute," lyrics and music by Johnnie Taylor and Jackie Avery.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Fass Black
Release Date:
1 February 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 1 February 1978
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Elliot Bellamy, owner of Shenandoah Records, flies into Los Angeles, CA, and meets with the head of his west coast operations, Manny Carlisle. Bellamy is furious his music is not selling well in Los Angeles and demands an explanation. Manny explains that local radio stations will not play songs unless they are popular at the city’s six major dance clubs. All of the clubs take their playlist cues from the most popular venue, Disco 9000. However, the owner of Disco 9000, Fass Black, only plays music from his record label. Manny complains that Fass is unreachable, so Bellamy suggests they both go to Disco 9000 and force Fass to meet with them. On the other side of town, Fass plays tennis with his female lawyer while his friend and fellow club owner, Fat Daddy, watches from the sidelines. After the game, Fat Daddy congratulates Fass on his club’s success but warns him to watch his back for jealous competitors. That evening, at Disco 9000, Fass talks business with his right-hand man, Midget. Bellamy and Manny arrive but cannot get past Midget and Fass’s bodyguards, Georgie and Tony Moose. Midget promises the men that Fass will meet with them in a few days. Insulted, Bellamy orders Manny to research Fass’s business and find weak spots, so they can exploit them. The next day, Fass has a sexual rendezvous with his female attorney. She knows Fass has a wife and children, but does not mind being his secret lover. Later, Fass goes to his record label where his producer, Gene Edwards, plays their latest musical tracks. ... +


Elliot Bellamy, owner of Shenandoah Records, flies into Los Angeles, CA, and meets with the head of his west coast operations, Manny Carlisle. Bellamy is furious his music is not selling well in Los Angeles and demands an explanation. Manny explains that local radio stations will not play songs unless they are popular at the city’s six major dance clubs. All of the clubs take their playlist cues from the most popular venue, Disco 9000. However, the owner of Disco 9000, Fass Black, only plays music from his record label. Manny complains that Fass is unreachable, so Bellamy suggests they both go to Disco 9000 and force Fass to meet with them. On the other side of town, Fass plays tennis with his female lawyer while his friend and fellow club owner, Fat Daddy, watches from the sidelines. After the game, Fat Daddy congratulates Fass on his club’s success but warns him to watch his back for jealous competitors. That evening, at Disco 9000, Fass talks business with his right-hand man, Midget. Bellamy and Manny arrive but cannot get past Midget and Fass’s bodyguards, Georgie and Tony Moose. Midget promises the men that Fass will meet with them in a few days. Insulted, Bellamy orders Manny to research Fass’s business and find weak spots, so they can exploit them. The next day, Fass has a sexual rendezvous with his female attorney. She knows Fass has a wife and children, but does not mind being his secret lover. Later, Fass goes to his record label where his producer, Gene Edwards, plays their latest musical tracks. At lunch, Fass’s receptionist, Denise, who is mother to Fass’s son, Kevin, complains that Fass does not spend enough time with their son and wants to get back together. However, Fass refuses to leave his wife, Karen, and their two children. Back at the club, Fass’s disc jockey, Earl Ross, begs Fass for $5,000 to pay a gambling debt. Fass says he will consider it. When Bellamy and Manny return to the club for their meeting, Bellamy demands that Fass play Shenandoah’s music in the club. Fass telephones his producer, Gene, puts him on the speakerphone, and asks his opinion of Shenandoah’s music. As Gene laughs that its records are terrible, Fass kicks Bellamy and Manny out, ordering them not to harass him again. After they leave, Manny tells Bellamy that he found a weak link in Fass’s organization. Meanwhile, Earl calls his creditors and begs for more time. The next evening, dozens of cars in the Disco 9000 parking garage are vandalized. At home, Fass mentions the incident to Karen, and she suggests it is a warning. A few days later, Midget throws a surprise birthday party for Fass at the club, and Denise arrives, hoping to celebrate with her former lover. When Bellamy telephones to express his “concern” for the club’s troubles, Fass realizes that Bellamy was behind the vandalism. Bellamy asks Fass to reconsider playing his music, but Fass refuses. Returning to the party, Fass observes that Denise is intoxicated and orders Earl to take her home. Fass then talks to Fat Daddy, who warns that Bellamy’s attacks will escalate. In the garage, two men hassle Earl over his gambling debt and threaten Denise. Swearing that he found a way to pay them back, Earl explains that someone offered him money in exchange for information on Fass, and Denise runs off to warn her past lover. A chase ensues and a van strikes and kills Denise as Earl and his pursuers flee. Fass and his staff attend Denise’s funeral, believing her death was an accident. Afterward, Bellamy’s henchmen destroy Fass’s recording studio and steal all of his master tapes. Fass receives word about the robbery the next morning. Fearing for his family’s safety, Fass makes arrangements to send them out of town. As Fass and Gene survey the damage, Gene says it will take four weeks to re-record the music tracks. Bellamy telephones with an offer to loan Fass the money to rebuild if he will accept his proposition, but Fass refuses yet again. Another evening, at the club, Earl nervously checks his watch during a dance contest. Meanwhile, a van full of Bellamy’s henchmen make their way to the stairwell. Earl finds the club’s electrical box and shuts off the power just as the men storm the club. The next morning, Bellamy telephones to gloat, and Fass threatens to kill his adversary. Bellamy warns that he intends to go after Fass’s wife and children next. The following day, Fass meets with Harold Jackson, an old family friend, and ask him to procure top-secret information. Later, Fass and Midget interrogate Earl, and he confesses that he betrayed them. After contemplating his next move, Fass meets again with Harold Jackson and acquires the requested information. Fass calls a meeting at his yacht with Bellamy, Manny, and their lawyer, George Essex. Bellamy assumes Fass is finally ready to concede, but Fass shocks his adversary with evidence of his tax evasion. Fass threatens to report Bellamy to the Federal Bureau of Investigation if he does not leave him alone. Defeated, Bellamy reluctantly agrees. Fass successfully rebuilds Disco 9000. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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