Goin' Home (1976)

G | 100 mins | Drama | 22 December 1976

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HISTORY

The Summary for this unviewed film is based on reviews in the 25 Dec 1976 LAT and the 29 Dec 1976 Var.
       Writer-director-producer-art director-editor Chris Prentiss was a forty-year-old former real estate salesman when he made Goin’ Home, according to the 12 Sep 1976 Lubbock, TX Avalanche-Journal. Prentiss spent $70,000 to lease three theaters in Lubbock to promote his film in that city alone. Prentiss reportedly took six years to bring Goin’ Home to the screen, beginning in Aug 1970, when he first imagined a screenplay about a dog named Crash. Using people he found on his journey through the South, Prentiss used their real names in the film. He claimed that during one scene, in which several real-life hoboes were on a Mississippi River barge, one drunken man fell into the water and drowned. New Orleans newspapers’ reportage of the incident “made it difficult to get financing,” Prentiss said. “I even went broke and had to stop production more than once.” Prentiss said he paid Lee Holdridge and the Los Angeles Philharmonic $100,000 to compose and record the film’s score. He added that Crash was killed in a Dec 1975 accident.
       The 13 Aug 1976 HR reported that the Los Angeles Philharmonic was set to perform the Goin’ Home soundtrack at the Hollywood Bowl in Hollywood, CA, on 21 Aug 1976. The 29 Dec 1976 Var noted that the Goin’ Home “standard refrain”—most likely a reference to composer Anton Dvorak’s “Going Home” from his New World Symphony —was interweaved through the soundtrack.
       Goin’ Home was Prentiss’s ... More Less

The Summary for this unviewed film is based on reviews in the 25 Dec 1976 LAT and the 29 Dec 1976 Var.
       Writer-director-producer-art director-editor Chris Prentiss was a forty-year-old former real estate salesman when he made Goin’ Home, according to the 12 Sep 1976 Lubbock, TX Avalanche-Journal. Prentiss spent $70,000 to lease three theaters in Lubbock to promote his film in that city alone. Prentiss reportedly took six years to bring Goin’ Home to the screen, beginning in Aug 1970, when he first imagined a screenplay about a dog named Crash. Using people he found on his journey through the South, Prentiss used their real names in the film. He claimed that during one scene, in which several real-life hoboes were on a Mississippi River barge, one drunken man fell into the water and drowned. New Orleans newspapers’ reportage of the incident “made it difficult to get financing,” Prentiss said. “I even went broke and had to stop production more than once.” Prentiss said he paid Lee Holdridge and the Los Angeles Philharmonic $100,000 to compose and record the film’s score. He added that Crash was killed in a Dec 1975 accident.
       The 13 Aug 1976 HR reported that the Los Angeles Philharmonic was set to perform the Goin’ Home soundtrack at the Hollywood Bowl in Hollywood, CA, on 21 Aug 1976. The 29 Dec 1976 Var noted that the Goin’ Home “standard refrain”—most likely a reference to composer Anton Dvorak’s “Going Home” from his New World Symphony —was interweaved through the soundtrack.
       Goin’ Home was Prentiss’s only film. He later established a successful, but controversial alcohol and drug rehabilitation center in Malibu, California.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Dec 1976
Section D, p. 17.
Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
12 Sep 1976
p. 33.
Variety
29 Dec 1976
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
SOUND
Prod mixer
Prod mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
STAND INS
Crash's owner
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"New World Symphony," composed by Antonin Dvorak.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 December 1976
Premiere Information:
Lubbock, TX opening: September 1976
Los Angeles opening: 22 December 1976
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After a dog, Crash, is accused of biting a child, the canine's owner, Todd, flees a Florida “redneck” sheriff to save his companion and hitchhikes west. In New Orleans, Louisiana, Todd meets Kevin, an African American shoeshine boy, along with riverboat deckhand Bernard, a kindly old black man named Mr. Ruffin, and a simple fellow named Dusty. Todd and Bernard join forces and, with Crash tagging along, leave the South, pursued by the villainous Evil, who nearly kills them when he burns down a barn. Todd, Bernard, and Crash travel to Big Sur, California, in search of a spiritual resting place they call ... +


After a dog, Crash, is accused of biting a child, the canine's owner, Todd, flees a Florida “redneck” sheriff to save his companion and hitchhikes west. In New Orleans, Louisiana, Todd meets Kevin, an African American shoeshine boy, along with riverboat deckhand Bernard, a kindly old black man named Mr. Ruffin, and a simple fellow named Dusty. Todd and Bernard join forces and, with Crash tagging along, leave the South, pursued by the villainous Evil, who nearly kills them when he burns down a barn. Todd, Bernard, and Crash travel to Big Sur, California, in search of a spiritual resting place they call “Home.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.