Another Man, Another Chance (1977)

PG | 135 mins | Western | 1977

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HISTORY

Credits include the following statement: "USA locations at the Burbank Studio and Arizona."
       The film had two directors of photography: Jacques Lefrancois in France and Stanley Cortez in America, according to the 9 Dec 1976 DV. Fabien Tordjmann and Georges Klotz shared editing duties in America and France, respectively. “Donna Roberts,” credited for wardrobe, is Dona Robertz. Tony Crupi is listed as an actor but apparently was cut from the film. Although the credits announce that this is “A Film by Claude Lelouch,” he is not listed in the film as either director or writer; “director” is implied in the credit, but “writer” is not, but Lelouch is on record (see item below) as saying he wrote it.
       The 17 Jan 1977 Box reported that principal photography began 13 Dec 1976. Locations were set to include Burbank Studios in Burbank, CA; Nogales and Tucson, AZ; New York City; and Paris, France. The 9 Mar 1977 Var noted that Lelouch had finished shooting.
       Lelouch wrote Another Man, Another Chance to translate the theme of A Man and a Woman (1966, see entry), his most successful film, “to pioneer America,” he told the 24 Sep 1975 LAT. In fact, his original title was A Man, A Woman & a Gun. During pre-production, other titles included A Western and James & Jane, according to both the 21 Jul 1976 Var and 23 Nov 1976 DV. A Western was Lelouch's title when he brought the project to Hollywood agent Irving Lazar in 1975, the 5 Nov 1975 ... More Less

Credits include the following statement: "USA locations at the Burbank Studio and Arizona."
       The film had two directors of photography: Jacques Lefrancois in France and Stanley Cortez in America, according to the 9 Dec 1976 DV. Fabien Tordjmann and Georges Klotz shared editing duties in America and France, respectively. “Donna Roberts,” credited for wardrobe, is Dona Robertz. Tony Crupi is listed as an actor but apparently was cut from the film. Although the credits announce that this is “A Film by Claude Lelouch,” he is not listed in the film as either director or writer; “director” is implied in the credit, but “writer” is not, but Lelouch is on record (see item below) as saying he wrote it.
       The 17 Jan 1977 Box reported that principal photography began 13 Dec 1976. Locations were set to include Burbank Studios in Burbank, CA; Nogales and Tucson, AZ; New York City; and Paris, France. The 9 Mar 1977 Var noted that Lelouch had finished shooting.
       Lelouch wrote Another Man, Another Chance to translate the theme of A Man and a Woman (1966, see entry), his most successful film, “to pioneer America,” he told the 24 Sep 1975 LAT. In fact, his original title was A Man, A Woman & a Gun. During pre-production, other titles included A Western and James & Jane, according to both the 21 Jul 1976 Var and 23 Nov 1976 DV. A Western was Lelouch's title when he brought the project to Hollywood agent Irving Lazar in 1975, the 5 Nov 1975 Var noted. The title was changed from Another Man, Another Woman to Another Man, Another Chance shortly before the film's release, according to the 14 Sep 1977 LAT. This was Lelouch's first American film.
       An on-the-set article in a 1978 edition of Motion, a Canadian film magazine, described Lelouch's approach to filming Another Man, Another Chance : “He operates his own Arriflex 35 BL and hand-holds about 95 percent of his shots. There is never a rehearsal with the actors, and a single shot will sometimes last five or ten minutes. There can be as many as ten or fifteen takes of a particularly elaborate shot.”
       The film was set to have its world premiere in Sep 1977 at the Festival of American Films in Deauville, France, the 19 Aug 1977 DV reported. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Jan 1977.
---
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1976.
---
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1976.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jan 1977.
---
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1977
p. 13, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Sep 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Sep 1977
Section G, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
24 Nov 1977
p. 1.
Motion Magazine
1978, Vol. 7, No. 1.
---
New York Times
24 Nov 1977
p. 17.
Variety
5 Nov 1975.
---
Variety
21 Jul 1976.
---
Variety
24 Nov 1976.
---
Variety
9 Mar 1977.
---
Variety
12 Oct 1977
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Film by Claude Lelouch
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
Asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Gaffer
Key grip
Cam asst
Best boy
2d grip
Still man
Stunt gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const
Set des
Leadman
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Ward
Cost
Cost
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod asst
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Livestock supv
Transportation
Casting
Casting
Spec coord
Craft service
SEG casting
COLOR PERSONNEL
Color by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Symphony No. 5 In C Minor," by Ludwig Van Beethoven
SONGS
"Complainte Du Nouveau Monde," lyrics by Pierre Barouh, music by Francis Lai.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Un Autre Homme, Une Autre Chance
Simon et Sarah
Un Homme Une Femme et des Fusils
Another Man, Another Woman
A Western
A Man, a Woman & a Gun
Release Date:
1977
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 November 1977
Production Date:
13 December 1976 - early March 1977
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 October 1977
Copyright Number:
LP50041
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
135
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
France, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

A modern photographer shoots an image for an advertising campaign in which a Cadillac automobile is pulled by a team of horses and driven by young women in frontier dresses. In an attempt to convince the advertising agency representative that the advertisement is ridiculous, the photographer mentions that his French great-grandmother was a frontier photographer, and says he would like to show him one of her photographs. A century earlier, Jeanne, a Parisian baker's daughter, explains that during the Franco-Prussian War, the Prussian army encircled Paris in 1871 and created severe food shortages inside the city. Jeanne asks photographer Francis Leroy if he would take a portrait of her fiance, a French soldier. Francis tells her to wait until the war is over, because he is too busy taking photographs of the besieged city’s desperate citizens. Meanwhile, in an American Western town, dance hall girl Debbie reads a newspaper article about Parisians eating dogs. Pulling her tiny pet dog closer, she says she wants to start a boarding school for children in a place where people do not know her. Outside town, veterinarian David Williams argues with his wife, Mary; she is tired of being alone on the frontier and wants to go back to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where her parents will set David up in business, but he is happy where he is. When Mary says she will leave after their baby is born, David tells her she will go without the baby. In Paris, where Francis is tired of the war, he reads an advertisement offering passage on a ship to America and puts his photographic studio up for sale. When Jeanne returns and asks him to take ... +


A modern photographer shoots an image for an advertising campaign in which a Cadillac automobile is pulled by a team of horses and driven by young women in frontier dresses. In an attempt to convince the advertising agency representative that the advertisement is ridiculous, the photographer mentions that his French great-grandmother was a frontier photographer, and says he would like to show him one of her photographs. A century earlier, Jeanne, a Parisian baker's daughter, explains that during the Franco-Prussian War, the Prussian army encircled Paris in 1871 and created severe food shortages inside the city. Jeanne asks photographer Francis Leroy if he would take a portrait of her fiance, a French soldier. Francis tells her to wait until the war is over, because he is too busy taking photographs of the besieged city’s desperate citizens. Meanwhile, in an American Western town, dance hall girl Debbie reads a newspaper article about Parisians eating dogs. Pulling her tiny pet dog closer, she says she wants to start a boarding school for children in a place where people do not know her. Outside town, veterinarian David Williams argues with his wife, Mary; she is tired of being alone on the frontier and wants to go back to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where her parents will set David up in business, but he is happy where he is. When Mary says she will leave after their baby is born, David tells her she will go without the baby. In Paris, where Francis is tired of the war, he reads an advertisement offering passage on a ship to America and puts his photographic studio up for sale. When Jeanne returns and asks him to take her family's portrait, Francis says he wants to photograph only her. After he takes her picture, Jeanne confesses that she likes him. That night, during an elaborate dinner, Jeanne announces to her parents and her fiance's family that she no longer wants to be married. She returns to the studio the next day and asks Francis to teach her photography. Francis says he is going to the American West where the sun shines year-round, and he wants Jeanne to accompany him. They sail for America, catch a train west, and transfer to a wagon train for the last part of their journey. They survive an Indian attack, and later a Polish fortune teller informs Jeanne that America will give death to Francis and life to her, adding that she will never return to France. Meanwhile, Mary has a baby boy, Simon, and even though her parents have come to take her to Philadelphia, she stays with David. He places an Indian good-luck charm bracelet around Mary’s wrist. According to tradition, he tells her, Mary will give it to Simon when he gets older. When David is not busy with his veterinary practice, he gambles and carouses in saloons and dance halls. One day, while David is in town, three bandits arrive at his ranch, rape Mary and kill her, but leave the baby untouched. When David finds Mary's body, he is devastated. Local people shun him because they think he was responsible for her death, so three months after burying her, David leaves town with Simon. At a crossroads, he leaves their fate to his horse, which decides to go south instead of north. In a small town, David runs into former dance hall girl Debbie, who has changed her name to Alice and opened a boarding school. She suggests that David go to Roll Point, a railroad terminal fifteen miles away, where cattle-driving ranchers often need veterinary services. David leaves Simon with Alice. In the town of Redland, he asks for directions from several people waiting to have their photographs taken outside the Leroys’ gallery. He rides ten miles farther and settles in Roll Point. Meanwhile, in Redland, Francis tries to interest Mr. Springfield, the owner of the Redland Gazette, in using a new engraving system that will allow him to print photographs. He also suggests that Springfield sponsor a handicapped race for foot-runners, horses, and wagons to promote newspaper circulation. Jeanne takes her daughter, Sarah, now about six years old, to Alice’s nearby boarding school. Over the next couple of years, both Sarah and Simon are Alice’s pupils, and both Jeanne and David come to drop them off or pick them up without running into each other. While Jeanne picnics alone with Sarah, she teaches the girl French and tells her that someday they will return to Paris. Nearby, David picnics with Simon and teaches the boy about horses, poker and guns, including the different types of “draws” used by outlaws like Jesse James and Billy the Kid. When David fires his pistol, Jeanne and Sarah hear the retort. At the school, Alice also teaches the kids about outlaws and presents them as heroic figures. One day, as David arrives at the school, Alice introduces him to Jeanne, who missed the stagecoach and needs a ride home. When they arrive at her photographic studio, Jeanne invites David in for coffee and explains that a year earlier her husband, working for the Gazette, was shot to death by a man who came to the studio to retrieve a photograph that Francis had taken of his outlaw son being hanged. She says that she hopes to interest the Gazette in following through with her husband’s idea of sponsoring “The Race of the Century.” Shortly afterward, David buys a young horse named Durango that he hopes to train for the race. When he takes Jeanne and their children on a picnic, he ties Durango behind his buckboard to give him a workout. As their children play together, David and Jeanne share histories; he does silly impressions of a Frenchman, and she teaches him French words. After they leave their children at school, Jeanne confesses that her husband has been in her thoughts all day, and now she wants to ride the stagecoach to Redland alone. He asks if he has a chance with her, and Jeanne replies that a gambler always has a chance. After she leaves, he saddles Durango and catches up with the stagecoach to tell her he plans to support her husband’s idea of “The Race of the Century.” When the day comes, David wins the race, along with the prize of many acres of land. Days later, bandits abduct David and take him, with his head covered, to a secret hideout where one of their comrades lies wounded. After David tends to the man’s gunshot wound, he notices one of the other outlaws wearing the Indian bracelet he gave Mary before she was murdered. Before the bandits prepare to lead him away from their hideout, David wedges a coin under one of his horse’s horseshoes. As soon as the outlaws abandon him near Roll Point, he takes off his hood and retraces his steps back to their camp. He kills three of them, ties them on their horses, and leads them to Roll Point to collect rewards. At the hotel where he lives, David finds that Jeanne has left her husband’s French hat for him, along with a message that she wants to see him before she returns to France. David rides outside town, where Jeanne photographs Simon and Sarah on a hilltop. They run down the hill to greet him, and Jeanne says that the Polish fortune teller was right: she never saw Paris again.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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