Friday the 13th (1980)

R | 95 mins | Horror | 9 May 1980

Director:

Sean S. Cunningham

Writer:

Victor Miller

Producer:

Sean S. Cunningham

Cinematographer:

Barry Abrams

Editor:

Bill Freda

Production Designer:

Virginia Field

Production Company:

Georgetown Productions
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HISTORY

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special Thanks to: Blairstown Fire Department, Blairstown, N. J., Richard Skow, Chief; Blairstown Police Department, Blairstown, N.J., Norman Bedell, Chief.”
       A Dec 1980 Premiere article stated that director Sean S. Cunningham intended to make the most terrifying movie ever, and take audiences on “an emotional roller coaster ride.” A 24 Mar 1980 DV article reported that Cunningham brought his independent film project to Los Angeles, CA, secured a production deal within four days and was offered several other projects by Paramount Pictures without ever going to film school, having relatives in the entertainment business, or completing an internship. According to an 11 Aug 1980 People news item, Paramount president Michael Eisner suggested he purchased the $1.2 million horror picture because the gore merited as some of the most highly creative screen killings he had ever seen.
       A 18 Sep 1979 DV brief announced that principal photography began on 10 Sep 1979 in west New Jersey. The film’s budget was $650,000, according to a 29 Oct 1980 DV news item.
       According to a 27 Jun 1980 LAT article, the movie was the second most successful of the summer after The Empire Strikes Back (1980, see entry). The film earned approximately $40 million in domestic release, as reported in the 29 Oct 1980 DV and a 9 Jul 1980 HR news item.
       A 16 Sep 1985 DV article reported that Sean S. Cunningham Ltd. and Manny Company filed a lawsuit alleging that Belmont Management Inc. and Georgetown Productions had failed to ... More Less

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special Thanks to: Blairstown Fire Department, Blairstown, N. J., Richard Skow, Chief; Blairstown Police Department, Blairstown, N.J., Norman Bedell, Chief.”
       A Dec 1980 Premiere article stated that director Sean S. Cunningham intended to make the most terrifying movie ever, and take audiences on “an emotional roller coaster ride.” A 24 Mar 1980 DV article reported that Cunningham brought his independent film project to Los Angeles, CA, secured a production deal within four days and was offered several other projects by Paramount Pictures without ever going to film school, having relatives in the entertainment business, or completing an internship. According to an 11 Aug 1980 People news item, Paramount president Michael Eisner suggested he purchased the $1.2 million horror picture because the gore merited as some of the most highly creative screen killings he had ever seen.
       A 18 Sep 1979 DV brief announced that principal photography began on 10 Sep 1979 in west New Jersey. The film’s budget was $650,000, according to a 29 Oct 1980 DV news item.
       According to a 27 Jun 1980 LAT article, the movie was the second most successful of the summer after The Empire Strikes Back (1980, see entry). The film earned approximately $40 million in domestic release, as reported in the 29 Oct 1980 DV and a 9 Jul 1980 HR news item.
       A 16 Sep 1985 DV article reported that Sean S. Cunningham Ltd. and Manny Company filed a lawsuit alleging that Belmont Management Inc. and Georgetown Productions had failed to compensate screenwriter Victor Miller and director Sean S. Cunningham for residual royalties owed from the sale of television and home video rights, as well as theatrical sequels. The suit claimed that Miller was owed $57,000, and Cunningham was asking for $22,000. The outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined.
       According to the 18 Sep 1979 DV, actor Harry Crosby (not to be confused with Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby) made his theatrical film debut in Friday the 13th. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that the film also marked the screen debut of Adrienne King.
       A 16 Oct 2000 US Weekly news item stated that thirteen Friday the 13th movies had been made and a fourteenth was in production. In these series entries, the killer, “Jason,” murdered 125 people. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Sep 1979.
---
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1980.
p. 10.
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1980.
---
Daily Variety
16 Sep 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 1980
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
15 May 1980
p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
27 Jun 1980.
---
New York Times
10 May 1980
p. 14.
People
11 Aug 1980.
---
Premiere
Dec 1980
pp. 32-33.
US Weekly
16 Oct 2000.
---
Variety
14 May 1980
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sean S. Cunningham Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy
2d elec
Key grip
Still photog
2d unit cam
2d unit asst cam
2d unit gaffer
2d unit elec
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst to art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop mistress
Asst prop
COSTUMES
Ward des
Ward mistress
Ward asst
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Atmospheric eff
Titles by
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Spec makeup eff by
Miss Palmer's hairstyle by
Hairstyles by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod office coord
Transportation capt
Loc auditor
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
STAND INS
Stunts
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
9 May 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 9 May 1980
New York opening: 10 May 1980
Production Date:
began 10 September 1979 in west NJ
Copyright Claimant:
Georgetown Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 September 1980
Copyright Number:
PA81093
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25901
SYNOPSIS

At Camp Crystal Lake in 1958, campers and counselors sing folk songs at night, while two counselors sneak to a boathouse, but are soon murdered by a stranger. Twenty-two years later on Friday the 13th, Annie asks the locals at a diner for directions to Camp Crystal Lake. As customers remark that “Camp Blood” has reopened, a truck driver named Ennis agrees to give Annie a ride halfway. As they walk to his truck, another local named “Crazy Ralph” recognizes Annie as a new camp employee, and says she will never return from there. Ennis warns Crazy Ralph not to scare Annie, but as they drive, he reveals that the camp is jinxed. There have been murders, a drowning, and contaminated water, but the killer has never been caught. Soon, counselors Marcie, Jack and Bill arrive at camp, as owner Steve Christy and his girl friend, Alice, continue to make repairs. Annie hitches another ride to the camp, but the driver passes the turnoff. She panics, jumps out of the car, and injures her leg. The driver chases her, and slits her throat with a hunting knife. Back at camp, the counselors swim at the lake, and sun themselves on the dock as a stranger in the woods watches. Soon, police officer Dorf arrives in search of Crazy Ralph. He warns the counselors not to play any pranks, and leaves. As Alice organizes the kitchen, Crazy Ralph emerges from the pantry, warns counselors they are doomed if they stay in camp, and leaves on his bicycle. Later, another counselor, Ned, watches as Jack and Marcie make out. He sees a stranger enter a cabin, ... +


At Camp Crystal Lake in 1958, campers and counselors sing folk songs at night, while two counselors sneak to a boathouse, but are soon murdered by a stranger. Twenty-two years later on Friday the 13th, Annie asks the locals at a diner for directions to Camp Crystal Lake. As customers remark that “Camp Blood” has reopened, a truck driver named Ennis agrees to give Annie a ride halfway. As they walk to his truck, another local named “Crazy Ralph” recognizes Annie as a new camp employee, and says she will never return from there. Ennis warns Crazy Ralph not to scare Annie, but as they drive, he reveals that the camp is jinxed. There have been murders, a drowning, and contaminated water, but the killer has never been caught. Soon, counselors Marcie, Jack and Bill arrive at camp, as owner Steve Christy and his girl friend, Alice, continue to make repairs. Annie hitches another ride to the camp, but the driver passes the turnoff. She panics, jumps out of the car, and injures her leg. The driver chases her, and slits her throat with a hunting knife. Back at camp, the counselors swim at the lake, and sun themselves on the dock as a stranger in the woods watches. Soon, police officer Dorf arrives in search of Crazy Ralph. He warns the counselors not to play any pranks, and leaves. As Alice organizes the kitchen, Crazy Ralph emerges from the pantry, warns counselors they are doomed if they stay in camp, and leaves on his bicycle. Later, another counselor, Ned, watches as Jack and Marcie make out. He sees a stranger enter a cabin, and follows him inside. As a rainstorm descends on the camp, Jack and Marcie take shelter inside a cabin. They make love on a bunk bed, while Ned lies dead above them on the top bunk with a slit throat. Marcie grabs her raincoat to visit the outhouse. In another cabin, Alice challenges Bill and Brenda to a game of strip Monopoly. While Jack waits for Marcie to return, he smokes a cigarette, and the killer grabs Jack by his forehead. The killer shoves an arrow through the base of his neck. When Marcie returns, a note tells her that Jack has gone to the outhouse. She hears the door creak, and thinks Jack has returned. She hears whispering, investigates the noise, and is murdered by a hatchet to her skull. As the Monopoly game progresses, wind blows the cabin door open, and Brenda leaves to fasten her cabin windows. Steve stops at the Blairstown diner, but tells the waitress, Sandy, he is in a rush to get back to camp even in the rain. As Brenda brushes her teeth, the killer watches. When Steve’s Jeep breaks down, Sgt. Tierney gives him a lift to camp in his patrol car. As Brenda reads in bed, she hears a voice crying, “Help me.” She grabs a flashlight and follows the voice in the rain. The killer turns on the electricity at the archery range and floods the area with light. When Alice hears a scream, she and Bill search for Brenda. At her cabin, they find a bloody hatchet resting on a pillow. As they search the camp, the other counselors appear to be missing. In the office, the phones are dead. They try to drive away, but the car will not start. Bill thinks they should stay in camp and wait for Steve to return. While driving, Sgt. Tierney gets a message to investigate a possible head-on collision, and leaves Steve near the camp entrance. As Steve approaches, the killer shines a light in his face. Steve recognizes the killer, who murders him. Then, the killer cuts off the camp electricity. Bill takes a lantern to check the generator, as Alice sleeps. When she awakens, she searches for Bill in the generator room, and finds him hanging on the door with his neck garroted and several arrows piercing his body. Hysterical, she returns to the music room, barricades the door, and grabs a baseball bat and fork from the kitchen. Brenda’s bloody body crashes through a window. Alice screams and crawls along the floor, but sees Steve’s Jeep when she peers out a window. She removes the barricade so she can talk to Steve. Mrs. Voorhees, the former camp cook, appears, and Alice tries to explain that everyone is dead. Mrs. Voorhees is not afraid, but criticizes Steve for reopening the camp after seeing Brenda’s bloody body. She tells Alice she was working the day a boy named Jason drowned in the lake. Mrs. Voorhees suggests that they leave, but Alice wants to wait for Steve. Mrs. Voorhees reveals that Jason was her only child, and she could not allow Steve to reopen the camp after his death. She accuses Alice of not paying attention to Jason’s distress and causing his death, then pulls out a knife. Alice knocks the older woman unconscious with a metal rod and runs away. However, Alice runs one way and sees Marcie’s dead body, then runs another way and sees Steve’s body. She finds a rifle in the barn, but no bullets. Mrs. Voorhees attacks Alice there, but she manages to knock her attacker unconscious with the butt of the rifle. Mrs. Voorhees comes to, and searches for Alice in the woods. Meanwhile, Jason’s voice tells his mother to kill Alice. Alice locks herself in the pantry, but Mrs. Voorhees breaks in, and Alice knocks her unconscious with a frying pan. When Mrs. Voorhees again regains consciousness, she finds Alice by the dock, and there is a struggle. Alice breaks free, grabs Mrs. Voorhees’ machete, and slices off her head. Alice gets in a canoe and glides onto the lake, where the police find her in the morning. At the hospital, she awakens from a nightmare in which Jason pulls her underwater as she sits in the canoe. Sgt. Tierney tells her that all the counselors are dead, but he did not find a boy in the lake. Alice replies that Jason must still be there. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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