Honeysuckle Rose (1980)

PG | 119 mins | Drama | 18 July 1980

Director:

Jerry Schatzberg

Producer:

Gene Taft

Cinematographer:

Robby Müller

Production Designer:

Joel Schiller

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

According to a 5 Sep 1979 Var news brief, a working title for the film was Sad Songs and Waltzes.
       Distributor Warner Bros. ran an apology for omitting musical credits in an advertisement that appeared in the 24 Jul 1980 HR. The additional musical credits can be seen in the catalog’s Literary Song Sources section for the film.
       A brief in the 14 Mar 1979 HR stated that singers Linda Ronstadt and Tanya Tucker were being considered for the female lead, and a 16 Jul 1979 HR news item added the names Rita Coolidge, Loretta Lynn and Debra Allen to the list. A 16 May 1979 Var article reported the film marked singer Willie Nelson’s lead theatrical debut. Previously, Nelson had a supporting role in The Electric Horseman (1979, see entry).
       The 16 May 1979 Var article reported that principal photography would begin 1 Sep 1979 in Austin, TX, with an approximately eleven-week schedule; however, a 21 Sep 1979 Warner Bros. press release announced that the film’s start date was pushed back to 8 Oct 1979. While the Var article estimated the budget between $5-$6 million, a 22 Jul 1980 HR column stated that the film’s budget was closer to $11 million.
       On 10 Oct 1979, Var announced Warner Bros. would film a Willie Nelson concert that day at the Convention Center Arena in San Antonio, TX, along with Emmylou Harris to be used as footage for the film. A 4 Sep 1980 DV news item reported actor Slim Pickens, cast ... More Less

According to a 5 Sep 1979 Var news brief, a working title for the film was Sad Songs and Waltzes.
       Distributor Warner Bros. ran an apology for omitting musical credits in an advertisement that appeared in the 24 Jul 1980 HR. The additional musical credits can be seen in the catalog’s Literary Song Sources section for the film.
       A brief in the 14 Mar 1979 HR stated that singers Linda Ronstadt and Tanya Tucker were being considered for the female lead, and a 16 Jul 1979 HR news item added the names Rita Coolidge, Loretta Lynn and Debra Allen to the list. A 16 May 1979 Var article reported the film marked singer Willie Nelson’s lead theatrical debut. Previously, Nelson had a supporting role in The Electric Horseman (1979, see entry).
       The 16 May 1979 Var article reported that principal photography would begin 1 Sep 1979 in Austin, TX, with an approximately eleven-week schedule; however, a 21 Sep 1979 Warner Bros. press release announced that the film’s start date was pushed back to 8 Oct 1979. While the Var article estimated the budget between $5-$6 million, a 22 Jul 1980 HR column stated that the film’s budget was closer to $11 million.
       On 10 Oct 1979, Var announced Warner Bros. would film a Willie Nelson concert that day at the Convention Center Arena in San Antonio, TX, along with Emmylou Harris to be used as footage for the film. A 4 Sep 1980 DV news item reported actor Slim Pickens, cast as a band member, was given four weeks of guitar lessons and a “$2,800 guitar,” but his songs were played by Grady Martin and Mickey Raphael filled in his harmonica playing during concert sequences. However, the film reportedly instigated a record deal for Pickens.
       According to Var, other locations included Nelson’s personal ranch in Dripping Springs, TX, where filming occurred during Oct and most of Nov 1979. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that a family reunion sequence was filmed in Fisher County, TX. A 20 Dec 1979 HR news item announced that principal photography was completed in Corpus Christi, TX.
       Reviews were mixed. While the 16 Jul 1980 Var review approved of the casting choices, praised the film for being “an old-fashioned love story,” and felt Nelson’s musical performances blended well with his acting, the 17 Jul 1980 LAT review called the film “a concert film with a plot” and the 18 Jul 1980 NYT made the observation that the film was most lively during its musical sequences. In contrast, the 28 Jul 1980 Time, criticized Nelson as a poor sex symbol, and the lack of tension in the story’s love triangle, while the 16-22 Jul 1980 Village Voice review felt Cannon and Irving were both miscast as Southern women.
       A “Rules of the Game” column by Stuart Byron in the 17-23 Sep 1980 Village Voice designated the film “a big disappointment,” generating only $8.5 million in box office revenues.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Jul 1980
pp. 1, 11.
Daily Variety
4 Sep 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 1980
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1980
p. 1.
New York Times
18 Jul 1980
p. 14.
Time
28 Jul 1980.
---
Variety
16 May 1979.
---
Variety
5 Sep 1979.
---
Variety
10 Oct 1979.
---
Variety
16 Jul 1980
p. 23.
Village Voice
16-22 Jul 1980
p.42.
Village Voice
17-23 Sep 1980
p. 48.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Sydney Pollack/Gene Taft Production
A Film By Jerry Schatzberg
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam/Loader
Stillman
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Concert lighting des
Gaffer
Best boy
Studio best boy
Rigging gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop
Const coord
Propmaker
Propmaker
Painter
Painter/ paperhanger
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward woman
Ward man
MUSIC
Orig mus by
Performed by
Mus supv
Mus consultant
SOUND
Boomman
Cableman
Concert rec by
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Post prod facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Casting dir
Casting dir
Casting, Texas
Casting asst, Texas
Extra casting, Texas
Loc mgr
Dir's secy
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col consultant for Technicolor®
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the screen story Intermezzo by Gösta Stevens and Gustaf Molander (Svensk, 1936).
SONGS
“Loving Her Was Easier,” written by Kris Kristofferson
“You Show Me Yours,” written by Kris Kristofferson
“A Song For You,” written by Leon Russell
+
SONGS
“Loving Her Was Easier,” written by Kris Kristofferson
“You Show Me Yours,” written by Kris Kristofferson
“A Song For You,” written by Leon Russell
“Make The World Go Away,” written by Hank Cochran
“So You Think You’re A Cowboy,” written by Willie Nelson & Hank Cochran, “Whiskey River,” written by John Bush Shinn
“Eighth Of January,” written by Johnny Gimble, “Jumpin’ Cotton Eyed Joe,” written by Johnny Gimble, “Under The ‘X’ in Texas,” written by Johnny Gimble
“Till I Gain Control Again,” written by Rodney Crowell, “Angel Eyes (Angel Eyes)” written by Rodney Crowell
“Coming Back To Texas,” written by Kenneth Threadgill, Chuck Joyce, and Julie Paul, “Singing the Yodeling Blues” written by Kenneth Threadgill, Chuck Joyce, and Julie Paul
“If You Could Touch Her At All,” written by Lee Clayton
“I Didn’t Write The Music,” written by Mickey Rooney Jr.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
A Song for You
Sad Songs and Waltzes
Release Date:
18 July 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 18 July 1980
Production Date:
8 October--20 December 1979 in TX
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 October 1980
Copyright Number:
PA84966
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Dolby Stereo™
Lenses/Prints
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
119
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26073
SYNOPSIS

Country musician Buck Bonham’s life is a series of concert dates strung together by tour road trips. After twenty years together, Buck’s guitar-player buddy, Garland Ramsey, tells him that he is leaving the band. When Buck returns home to the Honeysuckle Ranch, he gives his son, Jamie Bonham, a horse for his birthday. Viv Bonham embraces her husband and the couple heads to the bedroom, where she bursts out laughing when she sees “take me, I’m yours” written across his chest. Later, when Viv asks her husband how faithful he has been on the road, she is sad to hear there have been other women in his life. At the Bonham family reunion, Buck meets Garland’s grown daughter, Lily. When Buck is asked to sing, Jamie reluctantly accompanies him on guitar. Mid-song, Jamie leaves the stage and Lily finishes the tune as Buck follows his son to a nearby creek. Jamie thinks he does not possess musical talent, but Buck tells him to be patient because, in time, his talent will blossom. On the reunion stage, Buck and Viv perform a heartfelt duet that ends with a kiss. Later, Viv wishes Buck would tour less, but he tells her he cannot stop. When Buck books a short tour, several musicians are unavailable so Viv suggests Lily as a replacement for a couple of weeks. Garland is not happy about his daughter traveling with a bunch of rough musicians, and tries to talk her out of the idea, but Lily views it as a great opportunity to work as a professional. As the band leaves, Buck tells Viv to make a surprise visit with Jamie while he is on ... +


Country musician Buck Bonham’s life is a series of concert dates strung together by tour road trips. After twenty years together, Buck’s guitar-player buddy, Garland Ramsey, tells him that he is leaving the band. When Buck returns home to the Honeysuckle Ranch, he gives his son, Jamie Bonham, a horse for his birthday. Viv Bonham embraces her husband and the couple heads to the bedroom, where she bursts out laughing when she sees “take me, I’m yours” written across his chest. Later, when Viv asks her husband how faithful he has been on the road, she is sad to hear there have been other women in his life. At the Bonham family reunion, Buck meets Garland’s grown daughter, Lily. When Buck is asked to sing, Jamie reluctantly accompanies him on guitar. Mid-song, Jamie leaves the stage and Lily finishes the tune as Buck follows his son to a nearby creek. Jamie thinks he does not possess musical talent, but Buck tells him to be patient because, in time, his talent will blossom. On the reunion stage, Buck and Viv perform a heartfelt duet that ends with a kiss. Later, Viv wishes Buck would tour less, but he tells her he cannot stop. When Buck books a short tour, several musicians are unavailable so Viv suggests Lily as a replacement for a couple of weeks. Garland is not happy about his daughter traveling with a bunch of rough musicians, and tries to talk her out of the idea, but Lily views it as a great opportunity to work as a professional. As the band leaves, Buck tells Viv to make a surprise visit with Jamie while he is on the road. He promises to take her on a vacation after the tour ends. As they travel, Lily tells Buck she cannot believe her good fortune, while country stars like Emmylou Harris joins the band onstage for a show. After the concert, Buck misses Garland’s company and invites Lily to breakfast, and she reveals that she has been attracted to Buck since she was a little girl. At the hotel, they share a marijuana cigarette and fall into each other’s arms. At the ranch, Viv gets a call from Buck to add more dates to the tour. Buck and Lily’s affections grow until the arrival of Cotton, a musician in a flashy green cowboy suit with sequins, threatens to spoil Lily’s good time as he has been contracted to play for the rest of the tour. When Buck and his band upstage Cotton, a fight follows the show and Cotton leaves, while Buck openly declares his affection for Lily with a kiss. Cotton’s manager phones Viv to report that Buck will be sued for breach of contract, and he is having an affair with Lily. Backstage at a show, Viv sees the attraction between Buck and Lily as they perform, and when the song ends, she strides to the microphone and announces that her fifteen-year marriage to Buck is over. In spite of the awkwardness, the band decides to play at Garland’s picnic. However, Buck is adrift and travels to Mexico while Lily goes home and apologizes to her father for creating a mess. Garland travels to Mexico to confront Buck. Drunk on tequila, Garland chases after Buck, shooting a pistol. After a bullet grazes Buck’s shirt, they calm down and grab drinks at the cantina. Meanwhile, Lily goes to Honeysuckle Ranch and apologizes to Viv. Later, Viv explains to her son it is not enough to love somebody, they have to love you back, and Garland convinces Buck to return to his family. At Garland’s picnic, Viv apologizes to the crowd for Garland and Buck’s absence and performs a song. Buck surprises Viv, jumping on stage and accompanying her on his guitar, as the crowd cheers. Buck’s next song is an apology to Viv. Finally, the band launches into a rousing number, enabling Buck and Viv to rekindle their love in a duet, as Jamie and Garland join them on stage.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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