It's My Turn (1980)

R | 90 mins | Romantic comedy | 24 October 1980

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HISTORY

The following acknowledgment appears in end credits: “And special thanks to Dick Richards.”
       A 27 Nov 1980 Rolling Stone article reported that director Claudia Weill first became acquainted with writer Eleanor Bergstein through her political novel, Advancing Paul Newman, and contacted her about doing a screenplay for Weill’s project Girlfriends. Bergstein turned down the opportunity so that she could work on another novel. Four years later, Weill convinced Bergstein to collaborate on a project that that was planned to air as part of a prestigious series of filmmakers’ works on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS), funded by a $200,000 grant. Bergstein went to work in a leased house in Vermont. Being a rabid baseball fan, Bergstein used the news of thirty-seven-year-old ballplayer Luis Tiant’s contract renewal to become the inspiration for creating characters in two dissimilar fields, baseball and mathematics, that often did their best work before the age of thirty. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, an early draft of the screenplay was shown to executive producer Jay Presson Allen, who thought the project showed great potential, and suggested that it be made as a feature film instead.
       Rolling Stone reported that Weill set up a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox, and brought actress Jill Clayburgh on board. In a series of meetings that followed, Clayburgh worked with Weill and Bergstein on script rewrites. However, Alan Ladd, Jr. left his position as head of Fox, throwing the project into limbo until a deal was made with producer Ray Stark at Columbia Pictures.
       To prepare for her role as a mathematician, Clayburgh spent a ... More Less

The following acknowledgment appears in end credits: “And special thanks to Dick Richards.”
       A 27 Nov 1980 Rolling Stone article reported that director Claudia Weill first became acquainted with writer Eleanor Bergstein through her political novel, Advancing Paul Newman, and contacted her about doing a screenplay for Weill’s project Girlfriends. Bergstein turned down the opportunity so that she could work on another novel. Four years later, Weill convinced Bergstein to collaborate on a project that that was planned to air as part of a prestigious series of filmmakers’ works on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS), funded by a $200,000 grant. Bergstein went to work in a leased house in Vermont. Being a rabid baseball fan, Bergstein used the news of thirty-seven-year-old ballplayer Luis Tiant’s contract renewal to become the inspiration for creating characters in two dissimilar fields, baseball and mathematics, that often did their best work before the age of thirty. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, an early draft of the screenplay was shown to executive producer Jay Presson Allen, who thought the project showed great potential, and suggested that it be made as a feature film instead.
       Rolling Stone reported that Weill set up a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox, and brought actress Jill Clayburgh on board. In a series of meetings that followed, Clayburgh worked with Weill and Bergstein on script rewrites. However, Alan Ladd, Jr. left his position as head of Fox, throwing the project into limbo until a deal was made with producer Ray Stark at Columbia Pictures.
       To prepare for her role as a mathematician, Clayburgh spent a day with the Princeton University mathematics department, and received tutoring from a Princeton mathematics professor.
       A 29 Jan 1980 DV brief announced that the film, referred by its working title The Perfect Circle, began principal photography on 28 Jan 1980 in Los Angeles, CA. The Rolling Stone article stated that the picture had an eight-week shooting schedule of which seven weeks were spent filming at The Burbank Studios and one week was spent in New York City. According to a 24 Apr 1980 HR news item, the production completed filming in Los Angeles that day, and would move to New York City.
       A brief in the 28 May 1980 Var announced that principal photography was completed on that day. A few days later, the picture was retitled “It’s My Turn,” according to a 30 May 1980 DV news item.
       Rolling Stone reported that Stark loathed the final cut, and yanked it from Weill. When the recut film was shown to Columbia executives who preferred Weill’s version, Weill was given a chance to restore the picture to her vision. Reportedly, Weill’s second version came extremely close to her original film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1980.
---
Daily Variety
30 May 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 1980
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
24 Oct 1980
p. 1.
New York Times
24 Oct 1980
p. 12.
Rolling Stone
27 Nov 1980
pp. 56-57.
Variety
28 May 1980.
---
Variety
22 Oct 1980
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Rastar- Martin Elfand Production
A Claudia Weill Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Still man
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Const coord
Set dec, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Saxophone solo
SOUND
Prod mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd mixer, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Miss Clayburgh's hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Addl casting
Asst to Miss Weill
Asst to the prod
Loc mgr
Prod coord
Prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Cont, New York crew
Loc scout, New York crew
Extra casting, New York crew
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's My Turn," sung by Diana Ross, music by Michael Masser, lyrics by Carole Bayer Sager, produced by Michael Messer, courtesy of Colgems/EMI Music, Inc. and Unichappel Music Company
"This Is My Love," performed by Tony Travalini
"Walk On," performed by Ozone, courtesy of Motown Records.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Perfect Circle
Release Date:
24 October 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 October 1980
Production Date:
28 January--28 May 1980
Copyright Claimant:
Rastar Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 November 1980
Copyright Number:
PA87067
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses & Panaflex® Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
90
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At a Chicago university, Mr. Cooperman, a student, announces to his mathematics professor, Kate Gunzinger, that he is independently exploring a way to solve a mathematical proof she is researching, and if he is successful he will become famous. Kate is unimpressed with Cooperman, and chuckles, wondering if the world is ready for another renowned mathematician. At Kate’s loft apartment, she greets her boyfriend, Homer, and tells him that she is reluctant to attend her father’s upcoming marriage to Emma Lewin, a woman she intensely dislikes. Later, Kate is overwhelmed by the choices in her life: should she accept a dull administrative job, solve an important mathematical theorem, and leave Homer if she takes the new job in New York City? She and Homer laugh about her dilemma in bed. In New York, Kate has her interview, and is a guest at a wedding rehearsal dinner for her father, Dr. Jacob Gunzinger. She congratulates him, but barely acknowledges her stepmother Emma. When Jacob invites “his girl” to dance the waltz, he leads Emma to the dance floor, and Kate is awkwardly left standing alone. However, Emma’s son, Ben Lewin, asks Kate to dance, then twirls Kate until she is nauseous, but guides her to the patio for fresh air. In the restroom, Kate has a real conversation with Emma, and becomes less angry with her. Afterward, Kate hears other guests say that Ben is a successful, former professional baseball player. When the party is over, Ben walks Kate to her hotel, and she discovers that he now earns a living as a motivational speaker. When the hotel cocktail lounge is closed, they play ping-pong in the hotel ... +


At a Chicago university, Mr. Cooperman, a student, announces to his mathematics professor, Kate Gunzinger, that he is independently exploring a way to solve a mathematical proof she is researching, and if he is successful he will become famous. Kate is unimpressed with Cooperman, and chuckles, wondering if the world is ready for another renowned mathematician. At Kate’s loft apartment, she greets her boyfriend, Homer, and tells him that she is reluctant to attend her father’s upcoming marriage to Emma Lewin, a woman she intensely dislikes. Later, Kate is overwhelmed by the choices in her life: should she accept a dull administrative job, solve an important mathematical theorem, and leave Homer if she takes the new job in New York City? She and Homer laugh about her dilemma in bed. In New York, Kate has her interview, and is a guest at a wedding rehearsal dinner for her father, Dr. Jacob Gunzinger. She congratulates him, but barely acknowledges her stepmother Emma. When Jacob invites “his girl” to dance the waltz, he leads Emma to the dance floor, and Kate is awkwardly left standing alone. However, Emma’s son, Ben Lewin, asks Kate to dance, then twirls Kate until she is nauseous, but guides her to the patio for fresh air. In the restroom, Kate has a real conversation with Emma, and becomes less angry with her. Afterward, Kate hears other guests say that Ben is a successful, former professional baseball player. When the party is over, Ben walks Kate to her hotel, and she discovers that he now earns a living as a motivational speaker. When the hotel cocktail lounge is closed, they play ping-pong in the hotel game room. With the score five-zero in Ben’s favor, they switch to a computer baseball game. As Ben beats her at other games, he claims luck is on his side. Soon, they drink beer and talk in Kate’s room. As they discuss Ben’s injuries, he unbuttons his shirt to show her a scar. They make love, but are soon interrupted by a knock at the door. Kate receives a bouquet of red roses but the card is unsigned. Ben thinks the flowers are from Homer, but Kate is not sure. When she pricks her finger on some rose thorns, Ben bristles as she uses his shirt to stop the bleeding. He orders her to wash his shirt, but she balks, and insinuates that he uses his scars as a way to seduce women. However, she apologies for being more trouble than his groupies. They laugh about it, then hug, and Ben leaves. The next day, Kate receives both the job offer, and a bouquet of pink roses with an anonymous card that says “Sorry.” When she calls her parents to get Ben’s phone number, they invite her to visit, because Ben is at the apartment and they have a special gift for her. Kate says she too has a special wedding gift, and quickly purchases a fancy food processor. When Kate arrives, Jacob is moving his possessions into Emma’s apartment, and gives his daughter a tour. Soon, Ben’s friend, Flicker, a baseball public relations consultant, arrives with a wedding gift, and announces he has signed Ben to play in a televised Old Timer’s game. Ben is unenthusiastic until Flicker explains that the exposure will lead to endorsement deals with sponsors. Soon, Kate offers to help Ben pack up items from his father’s study. There, they find a stash of baseball cards with Ben’s photograph and statistics even though Ben claims his father is not interested in his baseball career. When Ben makes a joke that his father was collecting enough of his baseball cards to trade for one Lou Pinella card, Kate does not get the reference to the more famous and collectable player. Meanwhile, Ben takes Kate to Old Timers Day at Yankee Stadium, and she cheers when he makes a spectacular catch. After the game, they return to Kate’s hotel room and make love. As they talk about the changes in their lives, Kate vacillates about accepting the administrative job, and Ben is interested in a career in biofeedback. Later, at the airport, Kate says she will take the new job, and move to New York to be with Ben. He responds that he has to figure out how to leave a seven-year marriage, and do what is best for his young daughter. For the moment, he is scared to commit to a relationship with Kate. Although Kate is disappointed, they kid about being brother and sister, and say goodbye. Back in their Chicago apartment, Homer and Kate embrace, but Homer senses something is wrong. After much hesitation, Kate explains that their relationship is not working. She wants someone to nurture her, and listen to her problems, but Homer makes too many jokes. He admits that his former marriage was full of nurturing and listening, but it did not work for him. Although Homer prefers not to know the details of Kate’s recent trip, he realizes something irrevocable has occurred. Later, an ice cream vendor at the university campus hands Kate a gift from Ben. As Kate admires the signed baseball he sent, the vendor tells her that Ben hopes to work things out between them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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