Smokey and the Bandit II (1980)

PG | 101 mins | Comedy | 15 August 1980

Director:

Hal Needham

Producer:

Hank Moonjean

Cinematographer:

Michael Butler

Production Designer:

Henry Bumstead

Production Companies:

Rastar Films , Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The Producers gratefully acknowledge the following contributors to this motion picture: Chris N. Karamanos; Robert Kovoloff; Logan Fleming; Burt Reynolds, Sr.; Ben Harris, Florida Film Commission; and Union Pacific Railroad Company; Budweiser Beer; GMC Trucks; Pontiac.” Actor Jackie Gleason is listed in end credits as "Mr. Jackie Gleason" for the roles of "Buford T. Justice" and "Reginald Van Justice" and as "Ms. Jackie Gleason" for the role of "Gaylord Justice."
       According to a brief in 29 May 1979 DV, actress Julie Kavner, who was directed by Burt Reynolds in a stage production of Two For The Seesaw at Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre, was approached to co-star in the sequel, known at the time by the working title Smokey and the Bandit: Ten Four. However, Kavner does not receive onscreen credit. A news brief in 22 Jul 1980 US reported that actor Robert Urich appeared with Reynolds in a scene that involved pigs and roller skates. As the pigs escaped, the actors were left stuck in mud with their skates; however the scene was cut, before release. Urich did not receive onscreen credit for his cameo. A 13 Feb 1979 DV news item stated that creative differences between producer Mort Engelberg and Reynolds led to Engelberg’s replacement by Hank Moonjean. However, Engelberg reportedly was paid his full salary, points, and given screen credit despite his departure.
       A 19 Mar 1979 Box article announced that principal photography for the $10-millon film would begin Aug 1979 in Europe. However, a 16 Apr 1979 DV brief and a 3 ... More Less

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The Producers gratefully acknowledge the following contributors to this motion picture: Chris N. Karamanos; Robert Kovoloff; Logan Fleming; Burt Reynolds, Sr.; Ben Harris, Florida Film Commission; and Union Pacific Railroad Company; Budweiser Beer; GMC Trucks; Pontiac.” Actor Jackie Gleason is listed in end credits as "Mr. Jackie Gleason" for the roles of "Buford T. Justice" and "Reginald Van Justice" and as "Ms. Jackie Gleason" for the role of "Gaylord Justice."
       According to a brief in 29 May 1979 DV, actress Julie Kavner, who was directed by Burt Reynolds in a stage production of Two For The Seesaw at Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre, was approached to co-star in the sequel, known at the time by the working title Smokey and the Bandit: Ten Four. However, Kavner does not receive onscreen credit. A news brief in 22 Jul 1980 US reported that actor Robert Urich appeared with Reynolds in a scene that involved pigs and roller skates. As the pigs escaped, the actors were left stuck in mud with their skates; however the scene was cut, before release. Urich did not receive onscreen credit for his cameo. A 13 Feb 1979 DV news item stated that creative differences between producer Mort Engelberg and Reynolds led to Engelberg’s replacement by Hank Moonjean. However, Engelberg reportedly was paid his full salary, points, and given screen credit despite his departure.
       A 19 Mar 1979 Box article announced that principal photography for the $10-millon film would begin Aug 1979 in Europe. However, a 16 Apr 1979 DV brief and a 3 Dec 1979 DV article reported a delay in the start of principal photography as Reynolds had yet to complete a vehicle titled Rough Cut (1980, see entry), which pushed the sequel’s start date to 14 Jan 1980 in Florida. New items in the 15 Jan 1980 DV and the 23 Jan 1980 Var later stated that the Florida location had been switched to Las Vegas, NV. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, the production was on a sixteen-week schedule, and other locations included Jupiter and Miami, Florida, as well as Atlanta, GA.
       A 3 Feb 1980 PasadenaStar-News brief reported that filmmakers destroyed a condemned sixty-four-year-old roller coaster at the Lakewood Fairgrounds in Atlanta on 11 Feb 1980 for an action sequence in the film. Production notes added that the film’s finale involved a complex vehicular stunt, accomplished by the work of sixty stunt people, and the use of one hundred eighteen-wheeler trucks and police cars. A news item in the Jul 1980 Millimeter stated that a “celebrity Olympics sequence” was filmed on Reynolds’ ranch.
Millimeter reported that principal photography was completed “ahead of schedule.”
       A 19 Aug 1980 DV article stated that upon opening in over 1,200 theaters, the film earned more than $11 million, which marked the second all-time highest opening in industry history at the time. A 17-23 Sep 1980 Village Voice “Rules of the Game” column stated the picture was a “hit” with earnings of $30 million.
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BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Mar 1979
p. 6.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1979.
---
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1979.
---
Daily Variety
29 May 1979.
---
Daily Variety
3 Dec 1979.
---
Daily Variety
15 Jan 1980.
---
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1980
p. 4, 25.
Los Angeles Times
21 Aug 1980
p. 3.
Millimeter
Jul 1980.
p. 154.
New York Times
15 Aug 1980
p. 11.
Pasadena Star-News
3 Feb 1980.
---
US
22 Jul 1980.
---
Variety
23 Jan 1980.
---
Variety
20 Aug 1980
p. 20.
Village Voice
17-23 Sep 1980
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Rastar/Mort Engleberg Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
Sally Field's cost des
Cost supv
Men`s cost
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus cond
Mus ed
Mus mixer
Asst mus mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Sd re-rec
Loop dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opt eff
Titles and opt eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to prod
Asst to Hal Needham
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation capt
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Hal Needham and Robert L. Levy.
SONGS
“Texas Bound And Flying,” written by J. R. Hubbard, produced and sung by Jerry Reed
“Charlotte’s Web,” written by C. Crofford, J. Durrill, and S. Garrett
“Do You Know You Are My Sunshine,” written by D. Reid, and H. Reid, sung by The Statler Brothers
+
SONGS
“Texas Bound And Flying,” written by J. R. Hubbard, produced and sung by Jerry Reed
“Charlotte’s Web,” written by C. Crofford, J. Durrill, and S. Garrett
“Do You Know You Are My Sunshine,” written by D. Reid, and H. Reid, sung by The Statler Brothers
“Again And Again,” written by B. Peters, sung by Brenda Lee
“To Be Your Man,” written by D. Flowers and D. Williams
“Tulsa Time,” written by D. Flowers, sung by Don Williams
“Here’s Lookin’ At You,” written by S. Atchley, J. Durrill, and S. Pinkard, sung by Mel Tillis
“Ride Concrete Cowboy, Ride,” written by C. Crofford, J. Durrill, and S. Garrett, sung by Roy Rogers and The Sons of the Pioneers
“Pecos Promenade,” written by L. Collins, S. Pinkard and S. Garrett, sung by Tanya Tucker.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Smokey and the Bandit Have a Baby
Smokey and the Bandit: Ten Four
Release Date:
15 August 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 August 1980
Production Date:
14 January--14 April 1980 in Las Vegas,NV, Jupiter and Miami, FL, and Atlanta,GA
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
3 October 1980
Copyright Number:
PA84964
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After a Texas gubernatorial candidate, Big Enos Burdette, and his political rival, John Conn, take turns sabotaging each other, both candidates are reprimanded by the sitting governor, and ordered to stop their dirty political tricks. As Big Enos leaves, he overhears the governor demand that a special shipment from Miami, Florida, arrive in nine days for the Republican National Convention in Dallas, Texas. Big Enos then seeks out legendary driver, “Bandit,” and his trucker sidekick, Cledus “Snowman,” to handle the Miami shipment to Dallas, as a way to get back in the governor’s good graces. Big Enos offers to pay $200,000 for the assignment, but Bandit asks for and receives double the money. Elsewhere, Sheriff Buford T. Justice is not looking forward to his son Junior’s remarriage to Carrie, Bandit’s former girlfriend. During the wedding ceremony, Carrie “Frog” gets a long-distance call from Cledus, who offers her $50,000 to help Bandit stay sober during the haul. Carrie leaves Junior at the altar, but promises to buy him a milking machine with the money she earns. When Carrie arrives, Bandit is annoyed to find that she almost married Junior. She informs him that she has no romantic interest, but she will get him in shape for the sizeable paycheck. As Bandit becomes trim, toned, and sober, Cledus and Carrie present him with a black Pontiac Trans Am to replace the one he lost during his alcoholic binging. In Miami, a security guard informs the gang that crate no. 1444 needs to be quarantined for three weeks. Since Bandit has to deliver the shipment in three days, he steals the crate at night. As Cledus and Bandit argue about ... +


After a Texas gubernatorial candidate, Big Enos Burdette, and his political rival, John Conn, take turns sabotaging each other, both candidates are reprimanded by the sitting governor, and ordered to stop their dirty political tricks. As Big Enos leaves, he overhears the governor demand that a special shipment from Miami, Florida, arrive in nine days for the Republican National Convention in Dallas, Texas. Big Enos then seeks out legendary driver, “Bandit,” and his trucker sidekick, Cledus “Snowman,” to handle the Miami shipment to Dallas, as a way to get back in the governor’s good graces. Big Enos offers to pay $200,000 for the assignment, but Bandit asks for and receives double the money. Elsewhere, Sheriff Buford T. Justice is not looking forward to his son Junior’s remarriage to Carrie, Bandit’s former girlfriend. During the wedding ceremony, Carrie “Frog” gets a long-distance call from Cledus, who offers her $50,000 to help Bandit stay sober during the haul. Carrie leaves Junior at the altar, but promises to buy him a milking machine with the money she earns. When Carrie arrives, Bandit is annoyed to find that she almost married Junior. She informs him that she has no romantic interest, but she will get him in shape for the sizeable paycheck. As Bandit becomes trim, toned, and sober, Cledus and Carrie present him with a black Pontiac Trans Am to replace the one he lost during his alcoholic binging. In Miami, a security guard informs the gang that crate no. 1444 needs to be quarantined for three weeks. Since Bandit has to deliver the shipment in three days, he steals the crate at night. As Cledus and Bandit argue about the best way to get such a huge container loaded on the truck, Carrie pops the latch, and frees an elephant inside. Bandit does a flip and lands on the animal’s back. After a short ride, Bandit falls off, but it seems that “Charlotte,” the elephant, is willing to follow instructions. With a little prodding from Bandit, the elephant climbs in the truck, and the friends are on their way. However, Buford and Junior set up a roadblock, but Bandit charms Buford into demonstrating his marksmanship. After Buford uses all his bullets, the friends escape. When the gang stops for gasoline, they discover Charlotte is ill. As they decide what to do, an ambulance pulls into the gas station. The doctor in the ambulance is reluctant to examine Charlotte, but when his ride leaves without him, he agrees. Before long, Bandit and his gang wait at an open drawbridge and Buford catches up with them. Cledus radios Joe Klecko, another trucker, to delay Buford, who is stopped behind him. Soon, the gang makes a rest stop, and the doctor determines that Charlotte is pregnant, and will go into labor shortly. While Carrie thinks they should wait for Charlotte to give birth, Bandit wants to load the animal back on the truck. Carrie flirts with Bandit to dissuade him. However, Charlotte is jealous of Carrie, and grabs Bandit. The next day, Buford and Junior find Bandit, who starts a wild chase through some fairgrounds to evade the sheriff. Buford’s sloppy driving causes an old roller coaster to collapse, and once again, Bandit escapes. As Buford enters Louisiana, he contacts his brothers, officers Reginald and Gaylord Justice, to help him in his pursuit. Meanwhile, the doctor informs the gang that Charlotte cannot be moved until she gives birth. Bandit believes that transporting an elephant is his last chance for fame and glory, and insists they continue their journey. However, Carrie flashes her best smile, and they decide to eat and listen to music in town, while a local named Anthony T. Townes babysits Charlotte. At a nightclub, Bandit and Carrie fight over his obsession with delivering Charlotte. Carrie cannot tolerate being ignored, and walks out. Bandit gets drunk, and builds a net to keep Charlotte off her feet. Meanwhile, Reginald and Gaylord meet with Buford and Junior to trap Bandit. Buford pursues Bandit onto a desert road, where a fleet of squad cars filled with Gaylord and Reginald’s men, also give chase. However, Cledus has assembled an army of trucks that wreak havoc, and allow Bandit and Cledus to escape. They stop at a wild life preserve just in time for Charlotte to give birth. When a ranger from the preserve orders them to leave, Bandit bribes him with cash. As soon as Charlotte delivers a baby boy, Bandit wants to get back on the road. The doctor advises against it, and Cledus refuses to drive. Cledus then punches Bandit, who comes to his senses when he notices Charlotte shed a tear. Later, Bandit apologizes to Carrie, and asks for a chance to start over. He explains that he forfeited the money by not delivering Charlotte to the convention, then surprises Carrie with mother elephant and son, traveling on custom trailers. Carrie is ecstatic that Bandit thought of something beside himself for once. Elsewhere, Buford drives a Greyhound bus, vowing to exact his revenge sometime in the future. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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