Tilt (1980)

PG | 102 mins | Comedy | 23 December 1980

Director:

Rudy Durand

Producer:

Rudy Durand

Cinematographer:

Richard Kline

Production Designer:

Ned Parsons

Production Company:

Melvin Simon Productions
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HISTORY

The summary for this unviewed film was based on the following movie review from the 11 Apr Jul 1979 Var. Cast and crew credits were available courtesy of production notes in AMPAS library files, although they may be incomplete, and not entirely reflect what appears onscreen.
According to several industry sources, it took writer-director-producer Rudy Durand more than ten years to bring Tilt to the screen. As reported in a 2 Dec 1977 DV article, Durand first conceived of the idea for his film in 1969. He spent $80 thousand of his own money to hire six different writers, and eventually threw out all the work to write his own screenplay.
       A 12 Jul 1971 DV brief first announced principal photography would begin 25 Aug 1971 with actor Don Johnson to star, and actress Diane Hull as a possible costar. A 6 Jan 1972 LAT news item stated that Durand approached actor-director Orson Welles to play the role of “Harold ‘The Whale’ Remmens,” who declined due to scheduling conflicts, and Charles Durning was hired instead. A 28 Feb 1972 DV announced a new start date of 15 Apr 1972 with General Film Corp. handling distribution. As reported in the 28 Feb 1975 HR, Durand rewrote his script with help of writer Donald Cammell, set up a development deal with Bryanston Pictures, and was given a $1.5 million budget. Durand hired Cammell as director, and principal photography was set for 2 Jun 1975 in parts of AZ and TX.
       Instead, principal photography began Oct 1975, according to a 17 Nov 1975 ...
More Less

The summary for this unviewed film was based on the following movie review from the 11 Apr Jul 1979 Var. Cast and crew credits were available courtesy of production notes in AMPAS library files, although they may be incomplete, and not entirely reflect what appears onscreen.
According to several industry sources, it took writer-director-producer Rudy Durand more than ten years to bring Tilt to the screen. As reported in a 2 Dec 1977 DV article, Durand first conceived of the idea for his film in 1969. He spent $80 thousand of his own money to hire six different writers, and eventually threw out all the work to write his own screenplay.
       A 12 Jul 1971 DV brief first announced principal photography would begin 25 Aug 1971 with actor Don Johnson to star, and actress Diane Hull as a possible costar. A 6 Jan 1972 LAT news item stated that Durand approached actor-director Orson Welles to play the role of “Harold ‘The Whale’ Remmens,” who declined due to scheduling conflicts, and Charles Durning was hired instead. A 28 Feb 1972 DV announced a new start date of 15 Apr 1972 with General Film Corp. handling distribution. As reported in the 28 Feb 1975 HR, Durand rewrote his script with help of writer Donald Cammell, set up a development deal with Bryanston Pictures, and was given a $1.5 million budget. Durand hired Cammell as director, and principal photography was set for 2 Jun 1975 in parts of AZ and TX.
       Instead, principal photography began Oct 1975, according to a 17 Nov 1975 Box news item. Locations included Sinton, Corpus Christi, and Aransas Pass, TX, for a six- to eight-week schedule with Avco Embassy in charge of distribution. When Durand received financing from shopping center tycoon, Melvin Simon, the schedule changed yet again, and principal photography was set for 17 Oct 1977, according to articles in the 14 Sep 1977 Var and 6 Jan 1979 LAT. The bulk of the shooting would occur in Santa Cruz, CA, after considering New Orleans, LA, parts of TX, and Jacksonville, MS.
Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that an abandoned discotheque named Marguerita’s, on the outskirts of Santa Cruz, was used to construct seven sets used for filming. Within the structure, a large storage room housed many props that were used to dress the sets. Other locations included Mona’s Gorilla Lounge, which stood in for Mickey’s Place, and Tom Coulter’s Edgewater Inn in Capitola, CA, that doubled as Phil’s Club. Additional locations included a mall in downtown Santa Cruz, and a portion of Highway 29 in Watsonville, CA. A 5 Dec 1978 Warner Bros. press release in AMPAS library files stated that production also filmed on location in Corpus Cristi, TX, and Hollywood, CA.
       A 20 Dec 1979 HR article stated that Warner Bros., Inc. agreed to release the film in seven smaller markets on a trial basis, but influenced by poor reviews, the company pulled the movie from distribution. According to the 28 Apr 1980 HR, Durand persuaded Simon to buy back the film from Warner Bros. for $1 million so that Durand could reedit the picture.
       As reported in the 6 Jan 1979 LAT, Durand’s ambitious plan also included merchandizing tie-ins such as a soundtrack album, T-shirts, pinball machines, pajamas, jeans, Brooke Shield-decorated lunch pails, stick pins and other jewelry.
       The 2 Dec 1977 DV stated that the movie marked Durand’s directorial feature film debut.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Nov 1975.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1971.
---
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1972.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1979
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Jan 1979.
---
Variety
14 Sep 1977.
---
Variety
11 Apr 1979
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of cine
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Elec (local)
Best boy
Best boy
Photographic equip by
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
2d property
Painter
Sign painter
Sign painter
Const coord
Const foreman
Carpenter
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd boom
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod exec
Prod pub
Scr supv
Tech adv
Asst to prod
Asst to dir
Casting
Auditor
Casting (New York)
Casting (San Francisco)
Casting (Local)
Craft service (local)
Local loc mgr
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver props
Driver cam & sd
Driver flat bed truck
Driver honey wagon
Driver bus
Driver prod van
Driver utility
Driver set dressing
Teacher
Dial coach
Asst prod acct
Auxillary driver
Prod coord
Prod asst
Accounting sec
Local prod asst
Pub asst
Pub secy
Casting asst
Casting asst
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod secy (L. A.)
Post prod secy
STAND INS
Stunt coord
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 December 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 December 1980
Production Date:
began 17 October 1977 in Santa Cruz, CA
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
102
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

When an aspiring rock musician, Neil Gallagher, adopts Brenda Louise “Tilt” Davenport, a teenager versed in art of pinball hustling, the travellers begin a cross-country trek in order to launch Neil’s songwriting career. However, the real reason for Neil’s trip is to take part in a grudge match with Harold “The Whale” Remmens, a reigning pinball champion. ... +


When an aspiring rock musician, Neil Gallagher, adopts Brenda Louise “Tilt” Davenport, a teenager versed in art of pinball hustling, the travellers begin a cross-country trek in order to launch Neil’s songwriting career. However, the real reason for Neil’s trip is to take part in a grudge match with Harold “The Whale” Remmens, a reigning pinball champion.
+

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Teenage


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.