Windows (1980)

R | 96 mins | Drama | 18 January 1980

Director:

Gordon Willis

Writer:

Barry Siegel

Producer:

Michael Lobell

Cinematographer:

Gordon Willis

Editor:

Barry Malkin

Production Designer:

Mel Bourne

Production Company:

Michael Lobell Productions
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HISTORY

       According to a 12 Mar 1979 DV article and AMPAS library files, producer Michael Lobell, a former clothing manufacturer, decided to transition to movie producing in mid-1976. He placed advertisements in the UCLA Bruin and USC Trojan newspapers soliciting screenplays and discovered screenwriter Barry Siegel. Together, they decided to collaborate on “a romantic suspense thriller.”
       Lobell completed a script, and the project was developed for two years at Warner Bros. Pictures, before going into turnaround. Twentieth Century-Fox picked up the property but later abandoned it. In May 1978, Lobell struck a deal with United Artists.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin 17 Jan 1979 in New York City, according to a 21 Dec 1978 United Artists press release in AMPAS library files. A 29 Aug 1979 DV news item reported that the picture’s working title was Corky.
       Exteriors were shot primarily in and around Brooklyn Heights, NY, while interiors were split up between “two Manhattan studios.” Due to the sensitive nature of the story, the film was shot “on closed sets,” and actors pledged not to discuss it.
       Groups in cosmopolitan cities on both coasts led protests to draw attention to the misogynous and distorted views of women and lesbians in the film. Articles in the 25 and 26 Jan 1980 LAT reported that representatives from the Gay Community Services Center (GCSC), Parents and Friends of Gays, and the National Organization for Women (NOW) held a press conference 24 Jan 1980 criticizing the movie’s portrayal of lesbians. On 25 Jan 1980, approximately 300 demonstrators protested the picture in front of the Hollywood Pacific Theater in Los Angeles, CA. ... More Less

       According to a 12 Mar 1979 DV article and AMPAS library files, producer Michael Lobell, a former clothing manufacturer, decided to transition to movie producing in mid-1976. He placed advertisements in the UCLA Bruin and USC Trojan newspapers soliciting screenplays and discovered screenwriter Barry Siegel. Together, they decided to collaborate on “a romantic suspense thriller.”
       Lobell completed a script, and the project was developed for two years at Warner Bros. Pictures, before going into turnaround. Twentieth Century-Fox picked up the property but later abandoned it. In May 1978, Lobell struck a deal with United Artists.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin 17 Jan 1979 in New York City, according to a 21 Dec 1978 United Artists press release in AMPAS library files. A 29 Aug 1979 DV news item reported that the picture’s working title was Corky.
       Exteriors were shot primarily in and around Brooklyn Heights, NY, while interiors were split up between “two Manhattan studios.” Due to the sensitive nature of the story, the film was shot “on closed sets,” and actors pledged not to discuss it.
       Groups in cosmopolitan cities on both coasts led protests to draw attention to the misogynous and distorted views of women and lesbians in the film. Articles in the 25 and 26 Jan 1980 LAT reported that representatives from the Gay Community Services Center (GCSC), Parents and Friends of Gays, and the National Organization for Women (NOW) held a press conference 24 Jan 1980 criticizing the movie’s portrayal of lesbians. On 25 Jan 1980, approximately 300 demonstrators protested the picture in front of the Hollywood Pacific Theater in Los Angeles, CA. A 9 Apr 1980 Var article stated that in Boston, MA, Women Against Violence Against Women condemned the picture for its “grotesque misrepresentation of lesbianism” and “urged the public to boycott the film.” In anticipation of these protests, cinematographer-director Gordon Willis attempted to defend his film in the 22 Oct 1979 Village Voice, stating that the picture was “about insanity, not homosexuality.”
       The picture marked Willis’s theatrical directorial debut.
       End credits state: “Special thanks to A & S for their cooperation in the making of this film.” The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “The producer also wishes to thank the following organizations for their cooperation: “Brooklyn Children’s Museum, Mayor’s Office for Motion Pictures and Television, The State of New York, BOSE Corporation (for Hi Fi Equipment).” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Mar 1979.
---
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 1980.
---
LAHExam
21 Jan 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1980
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jan 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jan 1980.
---
New York Times
18 Jan 1980
p. 13.
Variety
23 Jan 1980.
---
Variety
26 Mar 1980.
---
Variety
9 Apr 1980.
---
Village Voice
22 Oct 1979.
---
Village Voice
28 Jan 1980.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Michael Lobell Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
2d asst dir
D. G. A. trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Gaffer
Key grip
Asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec
Set dresser
Scenic artist
Carpenter
Const grip
Const grip
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Loc coord
Loc coord
Prod office coord
Prod accountant
Auditing asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation
Asst to Mr. Willis
Asst to prod
Unit pub
Extra casting
Photographic equip by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Corky
Release Date:
18 January 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 18 January 1980
Production Date:
began 17 January 1979
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Corporation
Copyright Date:
18 March 1980
Copyright Number:
PA62323
Physical Properties:
Sound
Stereo
Color
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25770
SYNOPSIS

In Brooklyn Heights, New York, Emily Hollander is attacked and raped in her apartment by an intruder. In the morning, Emily’s neighbor, Andrea Glassen, notices police cars parked on the street and stops to see her friend. Emily falters as she attempts to explain what happened to Detective Bob Luffrono. Andrea admonishes the detective for making Emily nervous, before offering to stay and keep Emily company. However, Emily claims she needs to heal on her own. A day or two later, Emily rents an apartment in Manhattan in a large building with a doorman. Meanwhile, Andrea meets with the rapist and listens to the tape recording he made of Emily’s attack. When she returns home, she discovers Emily in the process of moving. The rapist returns to Emily's apartment, but the chain lock on the door prevents him from barging in. He flees, and Andrea comforts Emily with a hug. Emily visits Detective Luffrono at the police station to tell him about the second attack. She recalls additional details about her rape, but refuses to let the detective drive her to her new apartment. There, the doorman informs Emily that Andrea has brought in all her belongings. Emily goes to Brooklyn Heights to thank her friend and retrieve her cat, Jenny. When she returns to Manhattan, she finds Bob Luffrono in the hallway. He invites her to a nearby restaurant but she declines to go. The next day, after seeing her psychiatrist, Emily runs into Andrea, who is also a patient of Dr. Marin. Emily gets into Andrea’s taxicab and initiates a conversation with the cab driver, Lawrence Obecny. She is stunned to recognize his voice as ... +


In Brooklyn Heights, New York, Emily Hollander is attacked and raped in her apartment by an intruder. In the morning, Emily’s neighbor, Andrea Glassen, notices police cars parked on the street and stops to see her friend. Emily falters as she attempts to explain what happened to Detective Bob Luffrono. Andrea admonishes the detective for making Emily nervous, before offering to stay and keep Emily company. However, Emily claims she needs to heal on her own. A day or two later, Emily rents an apartment in Manhattan in a large building with a doorman. Meanwhile, Andrea meets with the rapist and listens to the tape recording he made of Emily’s attack. When she returns home, she discovers Emily in the process of moving. The rapist returns to Emily's apartment, but the chain lock on the door prevents him from barging in. He flees, and Andrea comforts Emily with a hug. Emily visits Detective Luffrono at the police station to tell him about the second attack. She recalls additional details about her rape, but refuses to let the detective drive her to her new apartment. There, the doorman informs Emily that Andrea has brought in all her belongings. Emily goes to Brooklyn Heights to thank her friend and retrieve her cat, Jenny. When she returns to Manhattan, she finds Bob Luffrono in the hallway. He invites her to a nearby restaurant but she declines to go. The next day, after seeing her psychiatrist, Emily runs into Andrea, who is also a patient of Dr. Marin. Emily gets into Andrea’s taxicab and initiates a conversation with the cab driver, Lawrence Obecny. She is stunned to recognize his voice as that of her rapist. She asks him to stop and wait while she makes a call from a pay phone. With trepidation, she returns to the cab, relieved when Bob Luffrono and his associates arrive to arrest Obecny. At the police station, Obecny tells a detective that he was paid to assault Emily. He offers to name his associate if police drop the charges against him. Later, Andrea uses a telescope to spy on Emily and Bob Luffrono as they dine and watch an old movie in Emily’s new apartment. In the weeks that follow, Andrea becomes more obsessed, listening repeatedly to the tape recording of Emily’s attack and continuing to spy on her from afar. One evening, as Emily and Bob embrace, Andrea telephones Emily. However, when Emily answers, Andrea remains silent. Bob takes the receiver, and Andrea tells him to keep his hands off Emily. Unnerved, Bob tells Emily no one was on the line. The next day, Emily calls Bob to tell him that while she was visiting her new neighbors, Ida and Sam Marx, she heard noises coming from her apartment. Sam offered to investigate but did not return. The cat, Jenny, is also missing. Bob agrees to stop by after work. Emily returns to her apartment, unaware that she is being observed by Andrea. Later that day, Dr. Marin conducts a session with Andrea, and insists that the neurotic woman admit herself to the hospital. Meanwhile, Bob investigates Emily’s building and discovers Sam's body in the basement. The detective urges Emily to lock her door and stay in her apartment. Meanwhile, Dr. Marin accompanies Andrea to Brooklyn Heights and waits as she packs a suitcase for her hospital stay. However, Andrea stabs him to death with a kitchen knife. In Manhattan, Emily discovers the frozen body of her dead cat in the refrigerator freezer. Andrea observes Emily through the telescope and telephones her. When Emily asks Andrea to come to her apartment, Andrea persuades Emily to come to Brooklyn Heights, instead. The doorman notices Emily leave by taxicab. When she arrives at Andrea's apartment, she notices the telescope pointed at her building. Andrea confesses her love and bolts the front door shut. Emily humors Andrea, stalling for time. Andrea threatens Emily with a knife and demands that she remove her sweater, but Emily refuses, and instead slaps her. Having deduced Emily's location, Bob and backup officers arrive and apprehend Andrea. Later, Bob and Emily walk across the Brooklyn Bridge back to her apartment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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