Going Ape! (1981)

PG | 87 mins | Comedy | 10 April 1981

Producer:

Robert L. Rosen

Cinematographer:

Frank V. Phillips

Editor:

John W. Wheeler

Production Designer:

Bob Kinoshita

Production Company:

Hemdale Film
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Love, Max.
       An article in the 7 Feb 1980 DV, and reviews in the 15 Apr 1981 Var and the 17 Apr 1981 NYT, reported that Jeremy Joe Kronsberg wrote Every Which Way But Loose (1978, see entry), a Clint Eastwood movie which featured one of Bobby Berosini’s trained orangutans, known as the “Orang-Utans." Kronsberg centered the screenplay of Going Ape! on three of Berosini’s “Orang-Utans,” and made his feature directorial debut on the film.
       The 7 Feb 1980 DV noted that Hemdale Film Group Ltd., a company based in London, England, was becoming an alternative source of film financing in the U.S. through its subsidiary, Hemdale Leisure Corp. Hemdale was discussing a Love, Max co-venture with Paramount, and production was anticipated to start in spring 1980. The 24 Apr 1980 DV stated principal photography for Love, Max would begin Monday, 28 Apr 1980 in Los Angeles, CA. The 8 Jul 1980 DV reported Paramount Pictures picked up the Hemdale Leisure Corp. film, still titled Love, Max, which was in production at that time. On 21 Jul 1980, HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       An article in the 20 Mar 1981 DV noted the title had been changed to Going Ape!, and the film would be released 10 Apr 1981 in more than 900 ... More Less

The working title of the film was Love, Max.
       An article in the 7 Feb 1980 DV, and reviews in the 15 Apr 1981 Var and the 17 Apr 1981 NYT, reported that Jeremy Joe Kronsberg wrote Every Which Way But Loose (1978, see entry), a Clint Eastwood movie which featured one of Bobby Berosini’s trained orangutans, known as the “Orang-Utans." Kronsberg centered the screenplay of Going Ape! on three of Berosini’s “Orang-Utans,” and made his feature directorial debut on the film.
       The 7 Feb 1980 DV noted that Hemdale Film Group Ltd., a company based in London, England, was becoming an alternative source of film financing in the U.S. through its subsidiary, Hemdale Leisure Corp. Hemdale was discussing a Love, Max co-venture with Paramount, and production was anticipated to start in spring 1980. The 24 Apr 1980 DV stated principal photography for Love, Max would begin Monday, 28 Apr 1980 in Los Angeles, CA. The 8 Jul 1980 DV reported Paramount Pictures picked up the Hemdale Leisure Corp. film, still titled Love, Max, which was in production at that time. On 21 Jul 1980, HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       An article in the 20 Mar 1981 DV noted the title had been changed to Going Ape!, and the film would be released 10 Apr 1981 in more than 900 theaters.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Feb 1980
p. 12.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1980.
---
Daily Variety
9 May 1980.
---
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1980.
---
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1981
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 1980.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Apr 1981
p. 13.
New York Times
17 Apr 1981
p. 11.
Variety
15 Apr 1981
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Hemdale Production
A Jeremy Joe Kronsberg Film
A Robert L. Rosen Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key grip
Gaffer
Still photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Dolly grip
Best boy
Elec
ART DIRECTORS
Illustrator
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Set des
Set des
Leadman
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Asst prop
Const foreman
Prop maker foreman
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Set des
COSTUMES
Set costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Boom man
Cableman
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Opt eff & titles
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod exec
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation co-capt
Unit prod mgr
Driver
Driver
Driver
Const driver
Craft service
Asst casting
Prop driver
Driver/Generator op
First aid
Extra casting
Unit pub
STAND INS
Berosini Orang-utan Stunts choreog by
Stunt coord
Fencing coord
Karate coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"It Ain't Who's Right, It's What's Right," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"Suddenly," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"Grim Brother Grimm," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
+
SONGS
"It Ain't Who's Right, It's What's Right," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"Suddenly," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"Grim Brother Grimm," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"Bittersweet," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"One Way Street," music by Elmer Bernstein, lyrics by Jeremy Joe Kronsberg
"The Golden Voyage Theme," by the writing and composing team of Robert Bearns and Ron Dexter, courtesy of Awakening Productions
"Love Theme From 'The Godfather,'" by Nino Rota.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Love, Max
Monkey See, Monkey Do
Release Date:
10 April 1981
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 April 1981
New York opening: 17 April 1981
Production Date:
28 April--21 July 1980 in Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Barclays Mercantile Industrial Finance, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
22 September 1981
Copyright Number:
PA116037
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
87
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26236
SYNOPSIS

Foster Sabatini quit his father Max Sabatini’s circus years ago. However, when Max dies, he bequeaths his three prize orangutans, Rusty, Tiga, and Popi, to his only son. If Foster keeps the animals alive for two years, he will also inherit $5 million dollars. Max’s will stipulates that his lawyer Jules Cohen will execute Max’s instructions, and circus aerialist Lazlo will assist in caring for the animals. If Foster fails, the Zoological Society will inherit the money. As Foster’s girl friend, Cynthia, packs to leave until he finds a way to handle the situation, Foster sneaks the animals past his landlord Zabrowksi. Before Cynthia departs, Foster introduces the orangutans to her, but the animals refuse to greet her and wreak havoc inside the apartment, particularly Tiga, who is jealous of Cynthia. Meanwhile, at the Zoological Society, board member Brandon suggests that if one orangutan dies, the board will receive the inheritance, and Gridley, the director, gives him money to carry out the plan. At an Italian restaurant, Brandon hires Joey and “Bad Habit” to kill an orangutan, but they insist he join them. The next day, Cynthia meets her mother, Fiona, outside Saint Anne’s Hospital, where Fiona volunteers. When Cynthia reveals she left one of her mother’s expensive paintings at Foster’s apartment, Fiona insists on retrieving it. Lazlo, who speaks little English, greets them at the door and is attracted to Fiona. Meanwhile, Brandon, Joey, and Bad Habit, dressed as repairmen, lower themselves from the roof on window-washing scaffolding and peer into Foster’s apartment, but the scaffolding is not secure and they fall into the courtyard fountain. ... +


Foster Sabatini quit his father Max Sabatini’s circus years ago. However, when Max dies, he bequeaths his three prize orangutans, Rusty, Tiga, and Popi, to his only son. If Foster keeps the animals alive for two years, he will also inherit $5 million dollars. Max’s will stipulates that his lawyer Jules Cohen will execute Max’s instructions, and circus aerialist Lazlo will assist in caring for the animals. If Foster fails, the Zoological Society will inherit the money. As Foster’s girl friend, Cynthia, packs to leave until he finds a way to handle the situation, Foster sneaks the animals past his landlord Zabrowksi. Before Cynthia departs, Foster introduces the orangutans to her, but the animals refuse to greet her and wreak havoc inside the apartment, particularly Tiga, who is jealous of Cynthia. Meanwhile, at the Zoological Society, board member Brandon suggests that if one orangutan dies, the board will receive the inheritance, and Gridley, the director, gives him money to carry out the plan. At an Italian restaurant, Brandon hires Joey and “Bad Habit” to kill an orangutan, but they insist he join them. The next day, Cynthia meets her mother, Fiona, outside Saint Anne’s Hospital, where Fiona volunteers. When Cynthia reveals she left one of her mother’s expensive paintings at Foster’s apartment, Fiona insists on retrieving it. Lazlo, who speaks little English, greets them at the door and is attracted to Fiona. Meanwhile, Brandon, Joey, and Bad Habit, dressed as repairmen, lower themselves from the roof on window-washing scaffolding and peer into Foster’s apartment, but the scaffolding is not secure and they fall into the courtyard fountain. Later, Foster cooks a romantic dinner for Cynthia, but she is appalled when he wants to bribe Jules, the lawyer, to change Max’s will, and she leaves. The next morning, the animals console Foster and Lazlo gives romantic advice, suggesting he give Cynthia a gift. Foster meets Cynthia, claims he is going to take care of the animals, and gives her a pair of earrings. Later, Brandon, Joey, and Bad Habit pose as ambulance attendants and break into Zelda’s apartment next to Foster’s. They render Zelda unconscious, then drill a hole into Foster’s bedroom, and retrieve two canisters of gas, planning to blow up Foster’s apartment. However, the first canister contains nitrous oxide and as the gas fills Foster’s apartment, Cynthia notices Tiga wearing a necklace that matches her earrings. When Foster admits he gave the necklace to Tiga, Cynthia is furious, but cannot stop laughing from the nitrous oxide fumes as she throws food at Foster. The animals retreat to the bedroom as a food fight ensues. As the killers slip a hose from a flammable gas canister into Foster’s apartment, Zelda regains consciousness and distracts them. The orangutans see the hose, push it back into Zelda’s apartment and plug the hole with a plunger. When Brandon ignites his cigarette lighter, Zelda’s apartment explodes. Later, as Foster and Lazlo clean their apartment, Zabrowski and two policemen knock on the door. Foster hides the animals, but Zabrowski reveals he was hired by Max to watch over them, and the police will provide protection. Elsewhere, Cynthia admits to her mother that she loves Foster and Fiona determines to help her daughter’s relationship with him, insisting that returning the earrings is the first step. Meanwhile, Gridley receives a telephone call at the Zoological Society. The unknown caller is angry that the animals are still alive, and Gridley promises to handle the situation. At an Italian restaurant, Joey learns the orangutans are worth $5 million to Foster, and suggests that he and Bad Habit kidnap one and ransom the animal. Dressed as policemen, they wheel a crate to Foster’s apartment. The police officer guarding the door is asleep and they knock him unconscious. Inside, Foster sleeps as the men attempt to kidnap the orangutans. Joey is knocked out the window and into the courtyard fountain, but Bad Habit lures Popi into the crate with beer. Bad Habit locks the front of the crate, but Popi slips out the back and leaves the apartment. Bad Habit wheels the crate onto the elevator as Cynthia and Fiona arrive. They notice the unconscious policeman and awaken Foster. Upon realizing that Popi is not in the apartment, they assume the “policeman” with the crate kidnapped him and that the policeman outside is part of the crime. They drag the unconscious officer inside and lock him into an animal crate as Gridley and Brandon arrive, posing as firemen. As Foster and the women protect Tiga and Rusty, Gridley and Brandon steal the animal crate, assuming Popi is inside. Moments later, Lazlo returns with Popi, who left to get more beer. Worried that Gridley and Brandon will return, they decide to split up and rendezvous at Saint Anne’s Hospital. Cynthia, Fiona, Rusty, and Popi leave on the elevator. As Foster, Lazlo, and Tiga head for the stairwell, Jules arrives with several outlaws. Foster offers Jules the $5 million to spare Tiga’s life, but Jules plans to kill the animal. Foster punches him, then escapes with Lazlo and Tiga into Zelda’s apartment. They stretch a drape to the apartment across the courtyard and climb across it. Lazlo dresses as a maid and wheels a laundry cart containing Foster and Tiga past Jules and his men, who race to the other apartment. Meanwhile, Cynthia’s car pulls alongside Joey’s police van. The men realize they did not kidnap Popi, after all, and a chase ensues. Outside the apartment building, Foster’s team drives off in a laundry van. As Jules chases them, he hits a police car and the police follow. Lazlo sees Cynthia drive by, and the two chases merge as he follows her. Elsewhere, Gridley and Brandon drive away, but the police officer regains consciousness, shoots the lock on the crate, and fires at his kidnappers. They crash near Saint Anne’s Hospital, causing a chain reaction collision that includes Joey’s van, Jules’ vehicle and the police car. Foster, his friends, and the animals run into the hospital, and split up as Joey and Bad Habit pursue them. Foster and Lazlo change into patients’ gowns and hide in the morgue with Tiga. When discovered, they push Joey and Bad Habit onto several corpses, and escape. Joey and Bad Habit recover and run down the hall, past Cynthia and Fiona, who are dressed as nuns and hiding Popi and Rusty under their habits. However, the women’s relief is short-lived as Jules and his men capture them, take them to a nearby woodworking plant, tie the women up, and strap Rusty to a conveyor belt headed toward a saw. Wanting the orangutans for themselves, Joey and Bad Habit arrive and fight Jules’ gang. Foster, Lazlo, and Tiga swing on ropes from the rafters and overcome the assailants as Rusty stops the conveyor belt. Foster kisses Cynthia and Lazlo kisses Fiona as the police arrive. The orangutans slip outside and drive off in a police car, sirens blaring, as everyone chases them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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