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End credits include special thanks to the following: Irvin Shapiro; Adams, Ray & Rosenberg Inc.; Kelley Drye & Warren; Pollock, Bloom and Dekom; Kirby McCauley; Pennsylvania Film Commission; Carnegie-Mellon University; New Jersey Film Commission; Gateway Toyota; Page America, Inc.; and Shehady’s Oriental Rugs.
       The uncredited role of “Stan” is played by Tom Atkins.
       The film is comprised of five unrelated segments, each depicting a different horror story from the comic book owned by character “Billy.” The stories are titled: “Father’s Day,” “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill,” “Something to Tide You Over,” “The Crate,” and “They’re Creeping Up on You!”
       An 11 Dec 1979 DV news item announced that George A. Romero’s production company, Laurel Show, Inc., would collaborate with writer Stephen King on two film projects, an adaptation of his 1978 novel, The Stand, and Creepshow, which would mark King’s first original screenplay. Although the 27 Feb 1980 Var estimated a $5 million budget, 24 Feb 1981 HR and DV articles one year later indicated that the film had reached $8 million in costs and had been acquired by United Film Distribution (UFD) for domestic release. HR, as well as a 24 Mar 1981 poster in a later edition of HR, indicated that principal photography would begin Jun 1981.
       In a 23 Dec 1981 Var article, producer Richard P. Rubinstein revealed that filmmakers cast name actors so their personas could quickly establish their characters within the time constraints of their short-form anthology stories, as well as to increase the movie’s television marketability. In addition, King, who made his motion picture ... More Less

End credits include special thanks to the following: Irvin Shapiro; Adams, Ray & Rosenberg Inc.; Kelley Drye & Warren; Pollock, Bloom and Dekom; Kirby McCauley; Pennsylvania Film Commission; Carnegie-Mellon University; New Jersey Film Commission; Gateway Toyota; Page America, Inc.; and Shehady’s Oriental Rugs.
       The uncredited role of “Stan” is played by Tom Atkins.
       The film is comprised of five unrelated segments, each depicting a different horror story from the comic book owned by character “Billy.” The stories are titled: “Father’s Day,” “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill,” “Something to Tide You Over,” “The Crate,” and “They’re Creeping Up on You!”
       An 11 Dec 1979 DV news item announced that George A. Romero’s production company, Laurel Show, Inc., would collaborate with writer Stephen King on two film projects, an adaptation of his 1978 novel, The Stand, and Creepshow, which would mark King’s first original screenplay. Although the 27 Feb 1980 Var estimated a $5 million budget, 24 Feb 1981 HR and DV articles one year later indicated that the film had reached $8 million in costs and had been acquired by United Film Distribution (UFD) for domestic release. HR, as well as a 24 Mar 1981 poster in a later edition of HR, indicated that principal photography would begin Jun 1981.
       In a 23 Dec 1981 Var article, producer Richard P. Rubinstein revealed that filmmakers cast name actors so their personas could quickly establish their characters within the time constraints of their short-form anthology stories, as well as to increase the movie’s television marketability. In addition, King, who made his motion picture acting debut as “Jordy Verrill,” was present on set to rewrite dialogue and scenes in order to make them more suitable for television censorship.
       A 14 Sep 1981 HR confirmed that filming was still underway, and that the producers hoped to screen the finished picture at the MIFED International Film and Multimedia Market. Production notes found in AMPAS library files indicated that photography took place on location in NJ, Squirrel Hill, PA, Fox Chapel, PA, and the Laurel studio in Pittsburgh, PA. The beach house interior for “Something to Tide You Over” was built entirely on set in the Laurel soundstages. Romero told the May 1982 edition of Twilight Zone Magazine that the production encountered various obstacles, including picketers protesting the film’s non-union crew. In addition, the technical and mechanical demands of the makeup, puppetry, and effects created challenges. Production notes stated that the monster in “The Crate” segment of the film took nearly five months to create. Sets for “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill” required two weeks of building, which included construction of a creek powered by a 500,000-gallon water tank. For “Creeping Up on You!,” filmmakers used thousands of live cockroaches, and consulted entomologists David A. Brody and Raymond A. Mendez with the New York City American Museum of Natural History to select three specific species.
       The 23 Dec 1981 Var announced that filming had concluded and the movie was scheduled for a summer 1982 release, although a 14 Oct 1981 Var advertisement announced that the picture was expected to screen at the Los Angeles Film Market in Mar 1982. The 24 Mar 1982 HR advertised a screening at the Cannes Film Festival on 20 May 1982. Although the 10 Jun 1982 LAHExam reported a 30 Jul 1982 release, it noted that Laurel, as a start-up company, had been forced to defer payment on $545,000 worth of losses until they could recoup their costs using Creepshow ’s grosses.
       On 15 May 1982, LAHExam announced that Warner Bros. had taken over as the film’s domestic distributor, following a bidding war, which also included Universal Pictures and Paramount Pictures, according to a 10 Jun 1982 DV article. Although UFD had planned to release the film in the U.S. in Jul 1982, Warner Bros. rescheduled the national opening for mid-Oct 1982. However, the 27 Sep 1982 DV reported that the studio delayed the 29 Oct 1982 release date until 12 Nov 1982, hoping to maximize box office returns. Due to a positive three-week test release in Providence, RI, in Aug 1982, Warner Bros. chose to open Creepshow on over 1,000 screens. The 23 Oct 1982 Var stated that film was anticipated to open nationally on 10 Nov 1982 in 1,100 theaters. At this time, Romero possessed the film rights to Creepshow II, though he and Rubinstein wished to measure the financial success of Creepshow before proceeding with a sequel.
       Released in 1987, Creepshow 2 (see entry) was produced by Romeo and directed by Creepshow ’s director of photography and post production coordinator, Michael Gornick. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 Dec 1979.
---
Daily Variety
24 Feb 1981.
---
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1982.
---
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1982
p. 3, 54.
LAHExam
15 May 1982.
---
LAHExam
10 Jun 1982
Section C, p. 1, 3.
Los Angeles Times
11 Nov 1982
p. 1.
New York Times
10 Nov 1982
p. 23.
Twilight Zone Magazine
May 1982
pp. 46-50.
Variety
27 Feb 1980.
---
Variety
23 Dec 1981
p. 22, 24.
Variety
14 Oct 1981
p. 50.
Variety
23 Dec 1981.
---
Variety
23 Oct 1982.
---
Variety
26 May 1982
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
United Film Distribution Presents
A Laurel Production
A George A. Romero Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Lighting dir
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
2d unit cam "Tide"
2d unit cam "Tide"
Key grip
Grip
Grip
Grip
Best boy
Slate
Loader
Still photog by
Still photog by
Still photog by
Still photog by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Mattes
Comic book art
Comic book lettering
Spectre art
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Prop master
Head scenic artist
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Scenic grip
Scenic grip
Head carpenter
Head carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Prop asst
Prop asst
Prop asst
Prop asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Asst des
Asst des
Asst cost des
Asst ward supv
MUSIC
Orig mus
Mus rec
Mus rec
Mus rec
Mus library
SOUND
Prod sd services by
Daily sd transfers
Post prod sd supv by
Dial ed
Addl sd ed by
Addl sd ed by
Addl sd ed by
Addl sd ed by
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Addl sd services by
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Scenic spec eff
Drowning eff des
Green eff
Green eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Make-up spec eff
Makeup
2d make-up
Make-up eff asst
Make-up eff asst
Make-up eff asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
Asst to dir
Casting consultant
Casting consultant
Unit mgr
Unit mgr
Prod office coord
Des office coord
Scr supv
Loc office coord
Prod secy
Prod secy
U. F. D. liaison
Roach wrangler
Roach wrangler
Post prod coord
Post prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Security
Caterer
Prod M.D.
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Bookkeeper
Bookkeeper
Auditor
Auditor
Office mgr
Accounting asst
Insurance
2d asst to prod
Cast asst
Cast asst
Cast asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
ANIMATION
Anim, Anivision, Ltd.
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 November 1982
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Festival screening: 20 May 1982
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 November 1982
Production Date:
began June 1981 in NJ and PA
Copyright Claimant:
Laurel Show, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 February 1983
Copyright Number:
PA166192
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
120
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Inside a suburban home, Stan slaps and punishes his young son, Billy, for reading a horror comic book titled, Creepshow. He throws the comic in the garbage can outside as a thunderstorm brews overhead. As Billy curses his father, a ghostly, skeletal corpse appears, floating outside his window. The phantom swoops down to the garbage can and the pages of Creepshow flip open to reveal the opening frames of a story called, “Father’s Day.” In a fancy estate, Richard Grantham sits with his sister, Cass Blaine, her husband, Henry “Hank” Blaine, and their haughty Aunt Sylvia Grantham. They await the annual visit from Great Aunt Bedelia, who murdered her father, Nathan Grantham, seven years earlier after he killed her lover. On the porch, Bedelia hears her father’s voice and she recalls the act of smashing his skull with a marble statue as he rudely demanded his Father’s Day cake. In the family graveyard, she drinks liquor and yells at Nathan’s tombstone. Suddenly, her father’s reanimated body bursts free from the ground and strangles her. While searching for Bedelia after dark, Henry falls into Nathan’s open grave next to Bedelia’s dead body. The tombstone falls onto his face and Nathan’s corpse staggers toward the house. In the kitchen, the zombie kills the housekeeper and snaps Aunt Sylvia’s neck. When Richard and Cass investigate, the corpse emerges from the kitchen carrying Aunt Sylvia’s head on a platter covered in icing and candles, wishing them both, “Happy Father’s Day.” In ... +


Inside a suburban home, Stan slaps and punishes his young son, Billy, for reading a horror comic book titled, Creepshow. He throws the comic in the garbage can outside as a thunderstorm brews overhead. As Billy curses his father, a ghostly, skeletal corpse appears, floating outside his window. The phantom swoops down to the garbage can and the pages of Creepshow flip open to reveal the opening frames of a story called, “Father’s Day.” In a fancy estate, Richard Grantham sits with his sister, Cass Blaine, her husband, Henry “Hank” Blaine, and their haughty Aunt Sylvia Grantham. They await the annual visit from Great Aunt Bedelia, who murdered her father, Nathan Grantham, seven years earlier after he killed her lover. On the porch, Bedelia hears her father’s voice and she recalls the act of smashing his skull with a marble statue as he rudely demanded his Father’s Day cake. In the family graveyard, she drinks liquor and yells at Nathan’s tombstone. Suddenly, her father’s reanimated body bursts free from the ground and strangles her. While searching for Bedelia after dark, Henry falls into Nathan’s open grave next to Bedelia’s dead body. The tombstone falls onto his face and Nathan’s corpse staggers toward the house. In the kitchen, the zombie kills the housekeeper and snaps Aunt Sylvia’s neck. When Richard and Cass investigate, the corpse emerges from the kitchen carrying Aunt Sylvia’s head on a platter covered in icing and candles, wishing them both, “Happy Father’s Day.” In the comic book story of “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill,” farmer Jordy Verrill witnesses a meteor crash to earth. When he touches the smoking rock, the heat burns his finger. Hoping to sell the meteor to the local college, he fills a bucket with water to cool the substance, but notices small white blisters forming on his fingers. The water causes the rock to split open and reveal an oozing blue liquid, which he pours into the crater. While Jordy watches television inside his house, the alien liquid turns acid green and eventually sprouts a mossy, plant-like growth. Sometime later, Jordy notices that his fingers have turned green and fuzzy. Fearing that the doctor will have to amputate, he refuses to call for help. The infection rapidly spreads across his body and throughout the house. He falls asleep on the couch, and when he awakens, his property is covered with foliage. Jordy prepares a bath and envisions his father in the mirror, who warns him that the water will only act as a catalyst for the growth. He falls into the tub anyway, and despite claiming to feel better, the water prompts the fuzz to overtake his body. Hours later, Jordy shoots himself in the head, and the television weather report announces that the county is expecting heavy rains. The comic flips to the pages of the story, “Something to Tide You Over,” in which Harry Wentworth receives a visit from Richard Vickers, the husband of his lover, Rebecca “Becky” Vickers. Richard plays Harry a recording of Becky’s voice, pleading for help. Richard drives Harry to his beach house, where he shows him a grave dug into the sand. As Harry runs toward the pit, Richard points a gun at him and orders him to stand in the empty hole and bury himself. With Harry covered to his neck in sand, Richard sets up a television and shows him a video recording of Becky, similarly buried in the sand as the tide closes in around her, causing her to choke on the waves. As Richard leaves, waves wash up onto Harry’s face. Returning home, Richard watches live footage of Rebecca and Harry’s heads. Eventually, Harry’s head becomes completely submerged in water and he drowns. When Richard returns to the vacant beach to retrieve his television equipment, he concludes that the current must have pulled Harry’s body out to sea. That night, however, Becky and Harry’s seaweed-covered corpses enter Richard’s house and summon him to the beach. Richard shoots them, but only green liquid spurts from the wounds. The zombies bury Richard in the sand and leave him to a similar fate. In “The Crate,” a university janitor named Mike finds a crate hidden under the basement stairs of Amberson Hall. At a faculty party, new members of the staff are introduced to Dexter “Dex” Stanley, a zoology professor, and Henry and Wilma “Billie” Northrup. Henry watches in embarrassment as the intoxicated Wilma loudly gossips and yells at him in front of the other guests. Dexter arranges a meeting with a young female student that night, but quickly cancels his plans to play chess with Henry. He receives an urgent telephone call from Mike regarding the crate, which the janitor claims is from 1834 and marked with a label reading, “Arctic Expedition.” After Dexter leaves the party to investigate, Henry fantasizes about shooting Wilma in the head. At Amberson Hall, Dexter and Mike remove the box from under the stairs. Meanwhile, Wilma and Henry return home, where she orders him around. When she later leaves to attend a class, he imagines choking her with his necktie. Back on campus, Dexter and Mike pry open the crate and find a furry, sharp-toothed monster, which kills and eats Mike. Dexter elicits help from a graduate student named Charlie Gereson, who is also attacked by the monster. The professor then runs to Henry’s house and attempts to devise a way to bury or destroy the crate. Henry drugs Dexter and leaves a note for Wilma before visiting Amberson Hall to clean up the blood. Wilma comes home and reads Henry’s note, which explains that he believes Dexter killed one of his young female lovers, and requests that Wilma to come to the school to help him. When she arrives, Henry laughs and pushes her under the stairs, but the monster does not immediately wake up. She screams and threatens her husband until the monster suddenly emerges and eats her. Henry carefully re-locks the beast into the crate and throws it into a river at the bottom of a quarry. Later that morning, he and Dexter agree to keep the incident secret, but the monster breaks free from its constraints. The comic book illustrations display the title page for the final story, “They’re Creeping Up on You.” Business tycoon Upson Pratt kills a cockroach in his spotless, sterile apartment. As he speaks with one of his executive employees, George Gendron, over the telephone, he becomes distracted by the appearance of more cockroaches. George reveals that Mr. Pratt drove his business rival, Norman Castonmeyer, to kill himself. Pratt continues to find and spray more cockroaches. Norman’s widow, Lenora, telephones and blames him for her husband’s death. When the building landlord, Carl Reynolds, phones, Pratt demands that he fix the roach problem. Pratt then finds roaches in his food. Through Pratt’s sealed front door, the maintenance supervisor, Mr. White, promises that a fumigating service will arrive in a few hours. Roaches emerge from the sink, vents, and lights. The power suddenly goes out and Pratt receives a telephone call from the police, who inform him that the bugs are everywhere, not just inside his apartment. Mr. Pratt shuts himself into an air-locked room, but the roaches hiding under his bedcover swarm over him and he chokes to death. When the lights turn back on, roaches explode from under Pratt’s skin and fill the room. Outside Billy’s house, two garbage men flip through the pages of the boy’s discarded comic book, which contains an advertisement for a voodoo doll. Inside, Billy vengefully pokes the voodoo doll, causing his father to writhe in pain. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.