Kiss Me Goodbye (1982)

PG | 101 mins | Romantic comedy | 22 December 1982

Director:

Robert Mulligan

Writer:

Charlie Peters

Producer:

Robert Mulligan

Cinematographer:

Donald Peterman

Editor:

Sheldon Kahn

Production Designer:

Philip M. Jefferies
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HISTORY

End credits include thanks from producers to the American Theatre Wing Tony® Award.
       As reported in a 16 Jan 1983 LAT article, Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation’s then-president of production, Sherry Lansing, immediately committed to producer-director Robert Mulligan’s idea for the film in Jul 1981. After screenwriter Charlie Peters completed nine weeks’ work on a first-draft screenplay, Mulligan convinced Sally Field to join the production by promising her top billing and a $1 million salary. James Caan reportedly accepted the role of “Jolly” for half his usual wage.
       Following a 3 Apr 1982 Screen International brief suggesting that six days of filming would take place in New York City before moving to Los Angeles, CA, later that month, the 16 Apr 1982 DV production charts estimated that principal photography would begin 28 Apr 1981. The 3 May 1982 Var noted that production was underway in Garrison, NY. According to the 16 Jul 1982 HR, Mulligan completed filming four days ahead of schedule.
       On 1 Sep 1982, HR stated that Fox considered opening Kiss Me Goodbye for the Christmas 1982 holiday, although it was unclear if the film would be completed by that time. However, the 15 Sep 1982 DV announced that, due to Fox’s decision to delay the release of The King of Comedy (see entry) until 1983, Kiss Me Goodbye would take its place on the studio’s distribution program, and was scheduled to open nationally 22 Dec 1982.
       In addition to a 9 Dec 1982 LAT report that a benefit screening would be hosted ... More Less

End credits include thanks from producers to the American Theatre Wing Tony® Award.
       As reported in a 16 Jan 1983 LAT article, Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation’s then-president of production, Sherry Lansing, immediately committed to producer-director Robert Mulligan’s idea for the film in Jul 1981. After screenwriter Charlie Peters completed nine weeks’ work on a first-draft screenplay, Mulligan convinced Sally Field to join the production by promising her top billing and a $1 million salary. James Caan reportedly accepted the role of “Jolly” for half his usual wage.
       Following a 3 Apr 1982 Screen International brief suggesting that six days of filming would take place in New York City before moving to Los Angeles, CA, later that month, the 16 Apr 1982 DV production charts estimated that principal photography would begin 28 Apr 1981. The 3 May 1982 Var noted that production was underway in Garrison, NY. According to the 16 Jul 1982 HR, Mulligan completed filming four days ahead of schedule.
       On 1 Sep 1982, HR stated that Fox considered opening Kiss Me Goodbye for the Christmas 1982 holiday, although it was unclear if the film would be completed by that time. However, the 15 Sep 1982 DV announced that, due to Fox’s decision to delay the release of The King of Comedy (see entry) until 1983, Kiss Me Goodbye would take its place on the studio’s distribution program, and was scheduled to open nationally 22 Dec 1982.
       In addition to a 9 Dec 1982 LAT report that a benefit screening would be hosted by the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation in Los Angeles on 10 Dec 1982, the 16 Dec 1982 DV noted that James Caan would host a 19 Dec 1982 benefit screening for the Barbara Caan Fund at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, CA.
       In the wake of the film’s largely poor critical reception, the 16 Jan 1983 LAT noted that Field had earlier attended Twentiety Century-Fox’s only preview screening in San Diego, CA, and discovered that marketing research suggested women responded positively to the story. Noting that various contemporary reviews compared the film to the 1976 Brazilian picture, Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands, the article reported that Twentieth Century-Fox had pre-emptively paid producers of Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands more than $100,000 for the scripts’ similarities.
       After nineteen days in 803 theaters, the $9 million picture grossed $10 million. A 9 Mar 1983 DV article claimed that one of the film’s investors, SLM Entertainment Ltd., III, had earned $25 million from the combined box offices grosses of Kiss Me Goodbye, The Verdict (1982, see entry), and Monsignor (1982, see entry).
       Sally Field was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Jun 1982.
---
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1982.
---
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1982.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Sep 1982
p. 1, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 1982
p. 3, 16.
Los Angeles Times
9 Dec 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Dec 1982
Section VI, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jan 1983
p. 20, 22.
New York Times
22 Dec 1982
p. 22.
Screen International
3 Apr 1982.
---
Variety
3 May 1982.
---
Variety
22 Dec 1982
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Bowardwalk/Burt Sugarman/Keith Barish Production
A Film by Robert Mulligan
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
Gaffer
Key grip
Still photog
Best boy
Elec
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Properties by
Prop asst
Prop asst
Const coord
Set des
Set des
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const foreman
Const foreman
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Stand-by painter
COSTUMES
Claire Trevor's clothes by
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles by
Titles by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Casting
Loc mgr, New York
Scr supv
Extra casting, Los Angeles
Extra casting, New York
Prod office coord
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Asst to Robert Mulligan
Prod auditor
Asst to Sally Field
Asst to Mr. Leo
Craft services
Animal trainer
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Security
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by material from Bruno Barreto and Jorge Amado.
SONGS
"But It's A Nice Dream," sung by Dusty Springfield, words and music by Peter Allen.
PERFORMER
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 December 1982
Premiere Information:
Myasthenia Gravis Foundation screening: 10 December 1982
Barbara Caan Fund screening: 19 December 1982
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 December 1982
Production Date:
began early May 1982 in New York City
Garrison, NY
and Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
4 February 1983
Copyright Number:
PA163455
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26714
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, Kay Villano walks her dog, Shakespeare, and visits her empty former house. Kay’s mother, Charlotte, arrives, criticizing Kay’s Egyptologist fiancé, Dr. Rupert Baines, and questioning why Kay wants to move back into the house three years after her former husband, Jolly Villano, died. Meanwhile, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rupert is anxious about his upcoming marriage to Kay the following week. Back at the house, Kay looks at the second floor balcony and remembers hosting a party to celebrate Jolly winning a Tony Award for choreography. Kay receives a visit from her friend Emily, but becomes distracted thinking about her late husband’s loving words in his acceptance speech. As Kay declares she is going to redecorate the house, she wanders into the bedroom and uncovers a portrait of Jolly. Charlotte identifies Rupert as a “nerd” and asks why Kay could not have found another man like Jolly. Kay re-imagines her husband’s death, watching as he fell from the stairs and hit his head during the party. Just then, Rupert arrives. He declares his love for the house, and Kay suggests they get married there. At dinner that evening, Rupert tries to tell Kay about his reservations about the new wedding location, but is repeatedly interrupted by greetings from Kay’s former friends. When she asks if Rupert would like to move into the house, he admits that he dislikes not knowing much about Kay’s former life with Jolly; however, he sees her enthusiasm for the idea, and concedes. While movers carry Rupert’s furniture inside, Kay envisions Jolly tap dancing around the house. Kay attempts to convince herself that Jolly is just a figment of her ... +


In New York City, Kay Villano walks her dog, Shakespeare, and visits her empty former house. Kay’s mother, Charlotte, arrives, criticizing Kay’s Egyptologist fiancé, Dr. Rupert Baines, and questioning why Kay wants to move back into the house three years after her former husband, Jolly Villano, died. Meanwhile, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rupert is anxious about his upcoming marriage to Kay the following week. Back at the house, Kay looks at the second floor balcony and remembers hosting a party to celebrate Jolly winning a Tony Award for choreography. Kay receives a visit from her friend Emily, but becomes distracted thinking about her late husband’s loving words in his acceptance speech. As Kay declares she is going to redecorate the house, she wanders into the bedroom and uncovers a portrait of Jolly. Charlotte identifies Rupert as a “nerd” and asks why Kay could not have found another man like Jolly. Kay re-imagines her husband’s death, watching as he fell from the stairs and hit his head during the party. Just then, Rupert arrives. He declares his love for the house, and Kay suggests they get married there. At dinner that evening, Rupert tries to tell Kay about his reservations about the new wedding location, but is repeatedly interrupted by greetings from Kay’s former friends. When she asks if Rupert would like to move into the house, he admits that he dislikes not knowing much about Kay’s former life with Jolly; however, he sees her enthusiasm for the idea, and concedes. While movers carry Rupert’s furniture inside, Kay envisions Jolly tap dancing around the house. Kay attempts to convince herself that Jolly is just a figment of her imagination, but Jolly explains that he is a ghost. When Charlotte comes back to the house, Kay forces Jolly into a chair and covers him with a sheet; Charlotte tries to have the chair moved, but Kay protests. Shakespeare the dog pulls the sheet away, but Jolly explains that no one else can see or hear him. That evening, Kay speaks aloud, stating that she is having a difficult time coping with Jolly’s return. During dinner, Jolly appears in the kitchen to tell Kay he still loves her, but Kay pleads for him to leave. At the table, Jolly listens as Kay’s family praise him; Rupert becomes frustrated and forces Kay to reaffirm her desire to marry him. Later, Jolly speaks to Kay while she is making love with Rupert and she responds, causing Rupert to become confused. Kay tells Rupert that Jolly’s ghost is living in the house, which infuriates Rupert. In order to prove his existence, Jolly tells Kay to say the name “Denise Del Florio,” the name of Rupert’s first love. Rupert is surprised, and leaves to get drunk in his office. Meanwhile, Kay follows Jolly into an empty Broadway theater. She begins to doubt her engagement to Rupert, but admits she was angry at Jolly for dying and leaving her alone. Later, Kay tells Emily about Jolly’s ghost and explains that she cannot choose between the two men. Rupert visits an attorney to ask if Kay can divorce her deceased husband, but the lawyer laughs. Emily urges Rupert to play along and act as if Jolly exists, so Rupert drives Kay and Jolly on a weekend trip to the country inn where Kay and Rupert met. They visit a diner, but Rupert embarrasses Kay by talking to Jolly’s empty chair and ordering him food. At the inn, Rupert telephones Emily to say he is losing his patience and plans to try a different approach. He pretends to see the ghost of his first lover, but Kay knows he is lying because Jolly cannot see her. Jolly explains to Kay that Rupert did not have sex with Denise Del Florio after all, but instead found her in bed with his father. When Kay recites this information back to Rupert, her fiancé admits he never told anyone that story. Although Rupert finally believes Jolly exists, Kay returns home, alone. Back in New York City, Rupert consults his co-worker, a former priest, who confirms the existence of spirits such as Jolly. At the wedding rehearsal, the former priest tries to remove Jolly’s ghost by sprinkling the rooms with holy water. Meanwhile, one of Kay’s relatives attempts to fix an electrical wire and gets locked in an upstairs room. Emily reveals that Jolly had an affair with her, in addition to multiple women in his shows, and Jolly does not deny her claim. Shakespeare sits outside the room in which Kay’s relative is trapped; Rupert’s co-worker hears the man’s voice calling for help and thinks Jolly’s spirit has possessed the animal. He leaves the holy water with Rupert, who chases the dog through the house. Downstairs, Kay confronts Jolly about his infidelity and defends her relationship with Rupert. When she declares that she no longer has room in her life for her late husband, Jolly willingly leaves. Rupert catches the dog and yells at it, proclaiming that he still plans to marry Kay. At that moment, the lights flicker, and Shakespeare runs away; Kay and Rupert declare their love for one another and agree to get married that evening. In the commotion, Rupert slips down the stairs and hits his head, but awakens unhurt. Kay momentarily sees Jolly tap dancing at the top of the stairs, but Rupert kisses her, and Jolly vanishes. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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