Shoot the Moon (1982)

R | 124 mins | Drama | 19 February 1982

Director:

Alan Parker

Writer:

Bo Goldman

Producer:

Alan Marshal

Cinematographer:

Michael Seresin

Editor:

Gerry Hambling

Production Designer:

Geoffrey Kirkland

Production Companies:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer , Fortress Films
Full page view
HISTORY

       End credits state: “The Producers would like to thank Eddie Powell, Peter Edwards, John D. Fouts, the County of Marin, and the City of San Francisco, who helped make this film possible”; and, “Made on Location in and around Marin County, California.”
       Although not credited onscreen, characters sing lyrics from song, “If I Fell,” written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and watch scenes from The Wizard of Oz (1939, see entry).
       According to a 20 Feb 1981 LAHExam article, writer Bo Goldman completed Shoot the Moon, his first feature screenplay, in the early 1970s. Impressed with his work, director Milos Forman hired Goldman to write One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975, see entry), which won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.
       Although Shoot the Moon began development at Twentieth Century-Fox, the 7 Jan 1981 DV announced that the project moved to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), to be produced by a British company called Fortress Films, which is not credited onscreen. The picture marked the fourth feature film collaboration of director Alan Parker and producer Alan Marshall, who previously worked on Bugsy Malone (1976), Midnight Express (1978), and Fame (1980, see entries). A 5 Aug 1980 HR article estimated a twelve-week shooting schedule and an $8.5 million budget.
       The 27 Feb 1981 HR confirmed that principal photography began 15 Jan 1981. A 21 Jan 1982 Filmex screening press release stated that filming took place in and around Marin County, CA. For the “Dunlap” home, filmmakers used the abandoned Roy Ranch House on the eighth fairway ... More Less

       End credits state: “The Producers would like to thank Eddie Powell, Peter Edwards, John D. Fouts, the County of Marin, and the City of San Francisco, who helped make this film possible”; and, “Made on Location in and around Marin County, California.”
       Although not credited onscreen, characters sing lyrics from song, “If I Fell,” written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and watch scenes from The Wizard of Oz (1939, see entry).
       According to a 20 Feb 1981 LAHExam article, writer Bo Goldman completed Shoot the Moon, his first feature screenplay, in the early 1970s. Impressed with his work, director Milos Forman hired Goldman to write One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975, see entry), which won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.
       Although Shoot the Moon began development at Twentieth Century-Fox, the 7 Jan 1981 DV announced that the project moved to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), to be produced by a British company called Fortress Films, which is not credited onscreen. The picture marked the fourth feature film collaboration of director Alan Parker and producer Alan Marshall, who previously worked on Bugsy Malone (1976), Midnight Express (1978), and Fame (1980, see entries). A 5 Aug 1980 HR article estimated a twelve-week shooting schedule and an $8.5 million budget.
       The 27 Feb 1981 HR confirmed that principal photography began 15 Jan 1981. A 21 Jan 1982 Filmex screening press release stated that filming took place in and around Marin County, CA. For the “Dunlap” home, filmmakers used the abandoned Roy Ranch House on the eighth fairway of the San Geronimo National Golf Course in Nicasio, CA. Crew members dismantled the house into six pieces, which were then moved to a property twelve miles away, reassembled, and decorated for filming. “Sandy’s” beach house was located on Stinson Beach. Production also took place at the Napa County Courthouse and Jack London’s Wolf House in Glen Ellen. San Francisco locations included: the Fairmont Hotel, Bay Bridge, California Street, St. Joseph’s Hospital, and the city’s Sea Cliff neighborhood.
       A 23 Feb 1981 DV news item reported that MGM hired several nonunion crewmembers, resulting in violations of the company’s contractual agreement with Teamsters Local 399. However, the issue was resolved, and production continued without delay.
       According to a 26 Jan 1982 LAT article, Parker completed the film in Oct 1981 and hoped to earn Academy Award consideration by scheduling a release date before the end of the year. A clause in Diane Keaton’s contract, however, stated that MGM could not release Shoot the Moon until 1982, to prevent the actress, who also starred in Paramount Pictures’ 4 Dec 1981 picture, Reds (see entry), from competing with herself for a Best Actress nomination.
       A 20 Jan 1982 Beverly Hills People article reported that Shoot the Moon was screened the week of 11 Jan 1982 at MGM studios. Following its 22 Jan 1982 release in New York City; Los Angeles, CA; and Toronto, Canada, the 2 Feb 1982 DV reported that the film was expected to open in other major cities 19 Feb 1982. In May 1982, the picture played in competition at the Cannes Film Festival.
       Albert Finney and Diane Keaton received Golden Globe nominations for Best Actor and Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama. Finney also earned a British Academy of Film and Television (BAFTA) nomination for Best Actor.
       Shoot the Moon marked the theatrical feature film debuts of television actresses Tina Yothers and Tracey Gold. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Beverly Hills People
20 Jan 1982.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1981.
---
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1981.
---
Daily Variety
8 Sep 1981.
---
Daily Variety
2 Feb 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 1982
p. 3, 40.
LAHExam
20 Feb 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1982
Section G, pp. 1-2.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jan 1982
pp. 1-2.
New York Times
22 Jan 1982
p. 13.
Variety
20 Jan 1982
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Presents
An Alan Parker Film
Presented by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
San Francisco cam
San Franscisco cam op
Lee Electric lighting consultant
Gaffer
Best boy
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Graphics
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Propman
Propman
Landscape coord
Const coord
Paint coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Asst to Ms. Zea
Asst to Ms. Zea
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd ed
Dubbing mixer
Eff ed
Boom op
Cable man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Financial controller
Scr supv
Casting--Los Angeles
Loc auditor
Asst auditor
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Parker
Asst to Mr. Marshall
London office
Office coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
"Play With Fire," performed by The Rolling Stones, courtesy of ABKCO Records Inc.
"I Can't Tell You Why," performed by The Eagles, courtesy of Asylum Records
"Still The Same," performed by Bob Seger, courtesy of Capitol Records.
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 February 1982
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 January 1982
Production Date:
began 15 January 1981
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 December 1981
Copyright Number:
PA123074
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
124
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26378
SYNOPSIS

While dressing for the Annual Book Awards ceremony, writer George Dunlap breaks into tears listening to his wife, Faith, squabbling with their four daughters in the next room. He seeks respite in his office and uses the telephone to make a call. Sherry, the eldest Dunlap daughter, discreetly picks up the receiver and hears her father speaking to a woman. Leaving the children at home, Faith and George drive to the event in San Francisco, California, where George wins an award and dedicates the honor to Faith for filling the “thankless role” of a writer’s wife. Back home, Sherry becomes upset when she notices her parents retire to separate bedrooms and assumes they are fighting again. The next morning, George throws a tantrum over his lost eyeglasses, and Faith reveals that she knows about his mistress. When she refuses to discuss the subject further, George smashes several plates, gather his bags, and leaves. As Faith falls into lethargic depression, Sherry struggles to keep the family afloat by scheduling her sisters’ appointments and cooking meals. One evening, George returns to the house with a police officer to reclaim his collection of books. While packing a box, Faith and George laugh reminiscing about happier times, but the mood quickly turns sour again and Faith sends him away. Although Sherry refuses to see her father, her sisters Jill, Marianne, and Molly spend their weekends with George and eventually meet his mistress, Sandy. At the house, Faith receives a visit from a contractor named Frank Henderson, who was previously hired to build a tennis court in the Dunlaps’ yard. Faith regretfully informs him that her recent separation has left her unable to pay ... +


While dressing for the Annual Book Awards ceremony, writer George Dunlap breaks into tears listening to his wife, Faith, squabbling with their four daughters in the next room. He seeks respite in his office and uses the telephone to make a call. Sherry, the eldest Dunlap daughter, discreetly picks up the receiver and hears her father speaking to a woman. Leaving the children at home, Faith and George drive to the event in San Francisco, California, where George wins an award and dedicates the honor to Faith for filling the “thankless role” of a writer’s wife. Back home, Sherry becomes upset when she notices her parents retire to separate bedrooms and assumes they are fighting again. The next morning, George throws a tantrum over his lost eyeglasses, and Faith reveals that she knows about his mistress. When she refuses to discuss the subject further, George smashes several plates, gather his bags, and leaves. As Faith falls into lethargic depression, Sherry struggles to keep the family afloat by scheduling her sisters’ appointments and cooking meals. One evening, George returns to the house with a police officer to reclaim his collection of books. While packing a box, Faith and George laugh reminiscing about happier times, but the mood quickly turns sour again and Faith sends him away. Although Sherry refuses to see her father, her sisters Jill, Marianne, and Molly spend their weekends with George and eventually meet his mistress, Sandy. At the house, Faith receives a visit from a contractor named Frank Henderson, who was previously hired to build a tennis court in the Dunlaps’ yard. Faith regretfully informs him that her recent separation has left her unable to pay upfront, but Frank takes a liking to her and agrees to follow through with the development. When George drops off the children, he asks Faith if Sherry would be willing to spend her upcoming birthday with him, but Faith is doubtful. Faith introduces him to Frank, prompting George to protest the plans for the tennis court. As the children help Frank with the construction, Faith invites him to stay for dinner. After the meal, the two adults move to the living room, where they kiss. The next morning, Sherry declares that she hates her father, but Faith does not blame George for the dissolution of her marriage. On Sherry’s birthday, George stops by the house to find his daughter has gone to the ballet with her grandmother. Before he leaves, George shouts obscenities at Frank as he works in the yard. Later that night, George returns with Sherry’s birthday present, but she refuses to see him. When Faith slams the door in his face, George smashes the glass window and barges into the house, grabbing Faith and throwing her outside. Upstairs, George breaks down Sherry’s bedroom door and beats her with a clothes hanger. As Faith struggles to open the lock, the daughters attempt to pull their father off Sherry, but he does not relent until Sherry threatens him with a pair of scissors. Faith re-enters the house and embraces her sobbing daughter as George flees in shame. Although Faith’s lawyer insists they limit George’s privileges with the children by depicting him as an abusive adulterer, Faith refuses. When Faith learns her elderly father, French DeVoe, has been hospitalized, she and George go to visit him. They pretend their marriage is stable, but French can sense they are lying, and dies a few minutes later. After the funeral, George finds Faith sitting alone in a restaurant and insists on joining her. As she grows agitated, Faith yells at him about the misery of their married life. George claims he never felt involved in the family, and stood by watching in awe as his wife raised their four children with seemingly little effort. When the discussion moves to their new lovers, Faith claims that Frank reminds her of the man George used to be. Two frustrated diners at an adjacent table become involved in their argument, and the restaurant owner encourages them all to sit down and order dinner. After several drinks, Faith and George drunkenly return to the hotel and kiss in the doorway to Faith’s room. Although she initially protests his advances, they have sex. Faith reflects on the former passion in their relationship until Sherry opens the door and sees them in bed together. Sometime later, Faith and Frank host a barbeque to celebrate the completion of the tennis court. When they dance together, Sherry scorns her mother for having sex with both Frank and her father. The girl runs through the woods toward the beachfront house where George, Sandy, and her son, Timmy, are playing cards. George notices Sherry sitting on the pier and brings her the typewriter he bought for her birthday. She asks him if he enjoys being with Sandy and Timmy more than her and her mother, but he insists he still loves Faith even though they need to go their separate ways. They hug, and George drives Sherry home, admiring Frank’s craftsmanship on the new tennis court. Hoping to be mature about their situation, Faith invites her estranged husband to bring Sandy over for a match sometime. Although George accepts the offer, he gets into his car and slams the gas, plowing through the tennis court and adjacent garage. Frank pulls George from the wreckage and beats him bloody, leaving his body in a heap on the ground. As the Dunlap girls surround their injured father, George weakly extends an arm toward his wife and murmurs her name. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.