The Other Side of the Mountain Part II (1978)

PG | 99 mins | Romance | 10 February 1978

Director:

Larry Peerce

Producer:

Edward S. Feldman

Cinematographer:

Ric Waite

Production Designer:

William Campbell

Production Companies:

Filmways, Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

The written statements, “Alta, Utah 1955,” and, “This is a continuation of a true story…” appear before the film’s title in the opening credits.
       End credits show the following postscript: “Jill and John Boothe now live in Bishop, California,” and the following acknowledgement: “The producers wish to thank the U.S. Forestry Service, Inyo National Forest, British Columbia Ferry Corporation, and Butchart Gardens, Victoria, B.C. for their cooperation in the filming of this motion picture.”
       Articles in the 6 Oct 1976 LAT and the 11 Oct 1976 Box announced plans for a sequel to The Other Side of the Mountain (1975, see entry), the true-life story of Olympic skiing hopeful, Jill Kinmont, who was paralyzed from the shoulders down in 1955 after a tragic accident in Alta, UT. Although producer Edward S. Feldman indicated that the sequel would dramatize her “fight against exclusion of the handicapped from the teaching profession,” the final script focused on Kinmont’s courtship with her new husband, John Boothe.
       As stated in various contemporary sources, including the 25 Jul 1977 Box, principal photography began 8 Jun 1977 on location in Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe, and Bishop, CA. The production also planned location shoots in Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Cast members Marilyn Hassett, Nan Martin, William Bryant and Belinda J. Montgomery reprised their roles from the original feature.
       An 8 Feb 1978 HR news item announced that a special screening to benefit Jill Kinmont’s Indian Education Fund was scheduled for 9 Feb 1978 at The Writers Guild Theater in Los Angeles, ... More Less

The written statements, “Alta, Utah 1955,” and, “This is a continuation of a true story…” appear before the film’s title in the opening credits.
       End credits show the following postscript: “Jill and John Boothe now live in Bishop, California,” and the following acknowledgement: “The producers wish to thank the U.S. Forestry Service, Inyo National Forest, British Columbia Ferry Corporation, and Butchart Gardens, Victoria, B.C. for their cooperation in the filming of this motion picture.”
       Articles in the 6 Oct 1976 LAT and the 11 Oct 1976 Box announced plans for a sequel to The Other Side of the Mountain (1975, see entry), the true-life story of Olympic skiing hopeful, Jill Kinmont, who was paralyzed from the shoulders down in 1955 after a tragic accident in Alta, UT. Although producer Edward S. Feldman indicated that the sequel would dramatize her “fight against exclusion of the handicapped from the teaching profession,” the final script focused on Kinmont’s courtship with her new husband, John Boothe.
       As stated in various contemporary sources, including the 25 Jul 1977 Box, principal photography began 8 Jun 1977 on location in Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe, and Bishop, CA. The production also planned location shoots in Victoria and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Cast members Marilyn Hassett, Nan Martin, William Bryant and Belinda J. Montgomery reprised their roles from the original feature.
       An 8 Feb 1978 HR news item announced that a special screening to benefit Jill Kinmont’s Indian Education Fund was scheduled for 9 Feb 1978 at The Writers Guild Theater in Los Angeles, CA.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
11 Oct 1976.
---
Box Office
16 May 1977.
---
Box Office
25 Jul 1977.
---
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1977.
---
Daily Variety
20 May 1977.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1977.
---
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1978
p. 3, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jun 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1978
p. 3, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Oct 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Feb 1978
Part IV, p. 26.
New York Times
24 Mar 1978
p. 12.
Variety
15 Jun 1977.
---
Variety
25 Jan 1978.
---
Variety
8 Feb 1978
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Filmways Production
A Larry Peerce-Edward S. Feldman film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles & optical eff
MAKEUP
Make-up
Make-up
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Tech adv
Prod asst
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's Time to Say I Love You," music by Lee Elwood Holdridge, lyric by Molly-Ann Leikin, sung by Merrily Webber.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2
Release Date:
10 February 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 February 1978
New York opening: 24 March 1978
Production Date:
began 8 June 1977 in Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe and Bishop, CA.
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 July 1978
Copyright Number:
PA8975
Physical Properties:
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
99
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25157
SYNOPSIS

Former competitive skier Jill Kinmont is now paralyzed from her shoulders down. She receives the “Woman of the Year” award in Los Angeles, California, for her advocacy for the disabled and teaching. Later, Jill visits her doctor, hoping for clearance to go on an extended summer vacation. Her doctor approves, but warns her to keep her stress levels to a minimum because she is susceptible to illness. Jill and her mother, June, drive to Bishop, California. There, Jill catches up with old friends, Linda and Audra-Jo, who are happily married and want to find Jill a husband, but Jill claims she has no desire to be wed. Later, Jill and Linda ride through the mountains in a Jeep. When their vehicle becomes stuck in a ravine, John Booth and his brother, Roy, help extricate the Jeep from the muddy water. Embarrassed to admit her paralysis, Jill declines when John invites them to his house. Jill later discovers that John lives next door to her summer home, and when he comes over on a maintenance call she realizes he also manages the property. Unfazed by Jill’s paralysis, John tells her she can call anytime. Later, Jill hears John coming home with a woman whom he picked up at a bar. Jill dreams of being on a date with a man named Mel. She longs for Mel to touch and kiss her, but he says it is pointless because she cannot feel anything. Jill demands that he take her home, but he suddenly kisses her against her will. Jill wakes up panicked and screaming. June ... +


Former competitive skier Jill Kinmont is now paralyzed from her shoulders down. She receives the “Woman of the Year” award in Los Angeles, California, for her advocacy for the disabled and teaching. Later, Jill visits her doctor, hoping for clearance to go on an extended summer vacation. Her doctor approves, but warns her to keep her stress levels to a minimum because she is susceptible to illness. Jill and her mother, June, drive to Bishop, California. There, Jill catches up with old friends, Linda and Audra-Jo, who are happily married and want to find Jill a husband, but Jill claims she has no desire to be wed. Later, Jill and Linda ride through the mountains in a Jeep. When their vehicle becomes stuck in a ravine, John Booth and his brother, Roy, help extricate the Jeep from the muddy water. Embarrassed to admit her paralysis, Jill declines when John invites them to his house. Jill later discovers that John lives next door to her summer home, and when he comes over on a maintenance call she realizes he also manages the property. Unfazed by Jill’s paralysis, John tells her she can call anytime. Later, Jill hears John coming home with a woman whom he picked up at a bar. Jill dreams of being on a date with a man named Mel. She longs for Mel to touch and kiss her, but he says it is pointless because she cannot feel anything. Jill demands that he take her home, but he suddenly kisses her against her will. Jill wakes up panicked and screaming. June runes into the room and calms her daughter. Once Jill recovers, she asks June who will take care of her when she dies, but June refuses to discuss the topic. The next day, John tells Jill that he read her autobiography and feels flustered around her because she is a “celebrity.” Later, Jill has lunch with Audra-Jo, who asks if John has asked Jill out on a date yet. Audra-Jo gossips that John is recently divorced and does not go out much, but Jill thinks it is pointless to start a romance. When Audra-Jo asks Jill if she has dated anyone since her former fiancé, skier Dick Buek, died in an accident, Jill admits her fear of losing another loved one. Jill reminds Audra-Jo that her paralysis prevents her from having sex or bearing children. That evening, Jill asks John to watch the Fourth of July fireworks with her, and John admits the event is the closest thing he has had to a date in a while. John talks about his job as a long haul trucker and Jill asks if he would take her with him one day. The next morning, John arrives with his truck, honking his horn. The pair spends a romantic day together and Jill meets John’s parents. Another evening, Jill and John go to a bar with his brother, Roy, and Roy’s wife, Beverly. When a waitress asks Jill to move because her wheelchair is a fire hazard, Roy protests loudly and Jill asks John to take her home. As John places Jill in his truck, they profess their love for each other and kiss. Several weeks later, Jill and Linda shop at the grocery store and Linda asks how Jill’s relationship with John is progressing. Although Jill lists multiple reasons why the relationship will not last beyond the summer, Linda begs her friend not to turn her back on love. Later, Jill asks John why he loves her. Jill worries she is not enough for him, but John reassures her and asks her to join him on a road trip for a few weeks. Jill fears that John does not understand how hard it is to take care of her, but he insists on giving it a try. The next day, Jill tells her mother about John’s offer, and June claims her daughter is helpless without her. However, Jill argues she was not asking permission and suggests June could use a few weeks alone. Jill and John drive to Reno, Nevada, for a night of gambling. They share a room, and as John helps Jill out of her clothes, Jill asks him to make love to her. Later, when they go to the beach, Jill’s wheelchair becomes stuck in the wet sand. John carries Jill to a nearby rock before attempting to extricate the chair. Jill falls over and cannot move. Scared and embarrassed, she screams for John when a crowd gathers. Several days later, the vacation continues, and they enjoy themselves immensely. John takes Jill on a cruise and carries her to the top deck, where he asks her to marry him. Returning home, Jill tells June she is considering John’s proposal. The next day, during a terrible storm, John gets into an accident with another trucker. Jill hears a news report about the accident on the radio and learns that an unidentified trucker died. She assumes the worst and panics, remembering the loss of Dick Buek. However, John returns home hours later, unharmed, and pretends nothing happened. When Jill becomes upset and refuses to speak to him, John realizes that she already heard about the accident and apologizes for letting her worry. Jill asks for time alone to think things over. When John returns the next day, June informs him that her daughter became suddenly ill. June explains that Jill is much more fragile than John realizes, and that her illnesses are a common occurrence. June will not allow John to see Jill until she fully recovers. Sometime later, Jill tells John that their summer romance must end, but John begs her to reconsider. Jill refuses to listen, so he leaves, devastated. A few days later, John watches the Kinmonts pack up their belongings and leave. Impulsively deciding to follow them, John catches up with their van on the highway. John screams from his truck that he is not Dick Buek and will not die doing something reckless. Jill orders June to pull the van over and berates John for insulting Dick. John lifts Jill into his arms and demands to know why she is leaving him, but Jill says she will die if she endures another heartbreak. John cries that he needs her and offers to move to Los Angeles. However, Jill insists John will be fine without her because he is “whole” and “normal.” When John confesses that he was lonely his entire life before he met her, Jill breaks down and tells him to come closer. He runs to her as she swears she will never leave him again. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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