Blame It On the Night (1984)

PG-13 | 85 mins | Drama | 2 November 1984

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HISTORY

End credits include the following statements: “The producer gratefully acknowledges the cooperation and assistance from: The City of Los Angeles, California; the City of San Diego, California; the City of Phoenix, Arizona; MTV; AMFAC Hotels and Resorts; the Los Angeles Sports Arena; the McNichols Arena-Denver; the San Diego Sports Arena; Electrotec Productions, Inc.; Tom Beck; Ed Gish; Bob Gordon; Sumihiko Okazaki; Rolf Solstab; Shubert Systems Group; Gary Whitlock; Adidas; Adolph Coors Company; Audio Technica; Bike Athletic Co.; Billboard; Carillon Importers, Ltd.; Cashbox; Casio, Inc.; Cinelease, Inc.; Clairol, Inc.; Coca-Cola U.S.A.; the Denver Post; the Eagle Eye Film Co.; Eastman Kodak Co.; Ford Motor Company; Gibson Guitar Company; Hillerich & Bradsby Co.; International Film Productions; J&R Film Company, Inc.; the Nestle Co., Inc.; Orbis Publishing Limited; Parker Brothers; Pearl International, Inc.; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.; Rolling Stone; Sansui; Scholz Research & Development, Inc.; Sergio Valente; Strolee of California, Inc.; Texas Instruments; 3M Corporation; Time-Life; Toshiba; Unicord; Unique Product Placement; Weider Health and Fitness; Yamaha Musical Products; Zero Company; Zoetrope,” and, “LIFE title and format used with permission of TIME Incorporated.”
       A 30 Jul 1982 DV news brief referred to the production’s working title, Tin Soldiers.
       DV announced that Mick Jagger would star in the film. However, he is only credited onscreen for co-writing the story as “Michael Philip Jagger.” A 24 May 1983 DV news item reported that Houston, TX, real estate developer Constantine Kaldis financed the $6 million budget, with Malcolm McDowell starring, and Juan-Ruiz Anchia as cinematographer. However, Kaldis, McDowell, and Anchia do not appear in onscreen credits. An item in the 24 May 1983 HR stated ... More Less

End credits include the following statements: “The producer gratefully acknowledges the cooperation and assistance from: The City of Los Angeles, California; the City of San Diego, California; the City of Phoenix, Arizona; MTV; AMFAC Hotels and Resorts; the Los Angeles Sports Arena; the McNichols Arena-Denver; the San Diego Sports Arena; Electrotec Productions, Inc.; Tom Beck; Ed Gish; Bob Gordon; Sumihiko Okazaki; Rolf Solstab; Shubert Systems Group; Gary Whitlock; Adidas; Adolph Coors Company; Audio Technica; Bike Athletic Co.; Billboard; Carillon Importers, Ltd.; Cashbox; Casio, Inc.; Cinelease, Inc.; Clairol, Inc.; Coca-Cola U.S.A.; the Denver Post; the Eagle Eye Film Co.; Eastman Kodak Co.; Ford Motor Company; Gibson Guitar Company; Hillerich & Bradsby Co.; International Film Productions; J&R Film Company, Inc.; the Nestle Co., Inc.; Orbis Publishing Limited; Parker Brothers; Pearl International, Inc.; R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.; Rolling Stone; Sansui; Scholz Research & Development, Inc.; Sergio Valente; Strolee of California, Inc.; Texas Instruments; 3M Corporation; Time-Life; Toshiba; Unicord; Unique Product Placement; Weider Health and Fitness; Yamaha Musical Products; Zero Company; Zoetrope,” and, “LIFE title and format used with permission of TIME Incorporated.”
       A 30 Jul 1982 DV news brief referred to the production’s working title, Tin Soldiers.
       DV announced that Mick Jagger would star in the film. However, he is only credited onscreen for co-writing the story as “Michael Philip Jagger.” A 24 May 1983 DV news item reported that Houston, TX, real estate developer Constantine Kaldis financed the $6 million budget, with Malcolm McDowell starring, and Juan-Ruiz Anchia as cinematographer. However, Kaldis, McDowell, and Anchia do not appear in onscreen credits. An item in the 24 May 1983 HR stated a budget under $5 million, while a 28 Oct 1983 Backstage news brief cited the cost as $3 million.
       A 7 Oct 1983 HR news item reported that principal photography began in San Diego, CA, on 6 Oct 1983. Concert footage was shot during a free show, held 15 Oct 1983 at the San Diego Sports Arena, with Nick Mancuso playing the lead character, “Chris Dalton,” and Billy Preston, Merry Clayton, and Tom Scott performing. Backstage stated the film shot for four days in Phoenix, AZ, the nearby desert, and at the Pinnacle Peak restaurant. Var production charts on 11 Jan 1984 reported the film also shot in Los Angeles, CA; Denver, CO; Kansas City, MO; Dallas, TX; Phoenix, AZ; and New York City.
       A 30 Nov 1984 LAT news article stated the motion picture played a one-week Academy Award-qualifying run after “disappointing regional openings in the South and Southwest.” According to the Feb 1985 Box review, the film grossed $201,000 in 252 theatres during its initial weekend of release. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Backstage
28 Oct 1983.
---
Box Office
Feb 1985.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jul 1982.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1984
p. 3, 30.
LA Weekly
14 Dec 1984.
---
LAHExam
10 Dec 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Nov 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Dec 1984
p. 4.
Variety
11 Jan 1984.
---
Variety
7 Nov 1984
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Tri-Star Pictures presents
A Gene Taft production
From Tri-Star Delphi II Productions
A Pentimento Incorporated Production for The Taft Organization, Ltd.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
From a story by
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st cam asst
Steadycam
2d unit photog
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Still photog
Key grip
Best boy
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Painter
Draftsman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
COSTUMES
Nick Mancuso's ward
Nick Mancuso's stage accessories
Nick Mancuso's jewelry
MUSIC
Orig song score
Orig song score
Mus concepts
Vocals
Keyboards
Keyboards
Keyboards
Drums
Guitar
Percussion
Percussion
Synthesizer
Synthesizer
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Asst mus rec eng
Mus contractor
Mus rec at
Mus rec at
SOUND
Sd mixer
Post prod sd des
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst re-rec eng
Asst re-rec eng
Dolby consultant
Post prod sd consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opt
MAKEUP
Makeup artist/hair stylist
Makeup artist/hair stylist
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Concert des
Artistic adv
Artistic adv
Artistic adv
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Prod coord
Craft services
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Loc auditor
Extras casting
Extras casting
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Asst to Tony Wade
Prod secy
Instructor/Welfare worker
Unit pub
Prod's assoc
Prod accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Catering
Post prod auditor
STAND INS
Stunt double
Stunt double
Stunt driver
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Tempest," composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, performed by George Calusdian
"Romance," composed by Robert Schumann, performed by George Calusdian.
SONGS
"Lost In The Light," music and lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Ol' Grinnin' Moon," music and lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Blame It On The Night," music by Ted Neeley/Tom Scott, lyrics by Ted Neeley
+
SONGS
"Lost In The Light," music and lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Ol' Grinnin' Moon," music and lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Blame It On The Night," music by Ted Neeley/Tom Scott, lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Another One Night Stand," music by Ted Neeley/Tom Scott, lyrics by Ted Neeley
"Takin' Care Of Each Other," music by Ted Neeley/Tom Scott, lyrics by Ted Neeley
"One By One," music by Ted Neeley, lyrics by Ted Neeley/Judith Myers-Wax
"Stone Me," music by Ted Neeley/Tom Scott, lyrics by Ted Neeley/Gene Taft
"A Man Without A Woman," music by Ted Neeley, lyrics by Ted Neeley/Gene Taft, vocal by Candy Chase.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Tin Soldiers
Release Date:
2 November 1984
Premiere Information:
Regional opening: 2 November 1984
Los Angeles opening: 7 December 1984
Production Date:
began 6 October 1983 in San Diegp and Los Angeles, CA
Denver, Co
Kansas City, MO
Phoenix, AZ
Tuscon, AZ
Dallas, TX
and New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Tri-Star Pictures
Copyright Date:
2 April 1985
Copyright Number:
PA243788
Physical Properties:
Sound
Rec in Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Arriflex BLC Cameras supplied by Otto Nemenz International
Prints
in Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
85
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27514
SYNOPSIS

Rock star Chris Dalton tours with his band and learns that the mother of his thirteen-year-old son, Job Dalton, has died. Although he has never met the boy, Chris gains custody of Job and summons him to join him on the road. The boy reluctantly leaves Pershing Military Academy, where he lives, and flies to Los Angeles, California, to join his father. Job is met at the Forum in Inglewood, California, by Shelley, Chris’s road manager, and watches his father perform from backstage. After the show, Chris meets Job in the back of a limousine, and Shelley informs the singer she is returning home to spend time with her own child. As the tour continues, Job does not approve of his father’s unstructured lifestyle, and continues to wear his military academy uniform. In Denver, Colorado, Job finally attends one of Chris’s concerts. Before the show, Job is interviewed by a local television newscaster, and tells her he thinks rock n’ roll is foolish and promotes irresponsible behavior. When the interview is broadcast, Chris attempts to discipline the boy and they quarrel. Chris’s manager, Manzini, suggests Job be sent back to the military academy. That night Chris sneaks into Job’s room and removes the boy’s military uniforms and replaces them with “civilian” clothes. As the tour continues, Job remains aloof, and Chris grows increasingly frustrated. One night, “Animal,” a member of Chris’s road crew, takes Job to a roadhouse and the boy becomes intoxicated. A brawl breaks out, and the two are arrested. Manzini bails the two out of jail. Chris telephones Shelley and asks her to rejoin the tour. Later, as Job practices military strategy with tin soldiers, Chris ... +


Rock star Chris Dalton tours with his band and learns that the mother of his thirteen-year-old son, Job Dalton, has died. Although he has never met the boy, Chris gains custody of Job and summons him to join him on the road. The boy reluctantly leaves Pershing Military Academy, where he lives, and flies to Los Angeles, California, to join his father. Job is met at the Forum in Inglewood, California, by Shelley, Chris’s road manager, and watches his father perform from backstage. After the show, Chris meets Job in the back of a limousine, and Shelley informs the singer she is returning home to spend time with her own child. As the tour continues, Job does not approve of his father’s unstructured lifestyle, and continues to wear his military academy uniform. In Denver, Colorado, Job finally attends one of Chris’s concerts. Before the show, Job is interviewed by a local television newscaster, and tells her he thinks rock n’ roll is foolish and promotes irresponsible behavior. When the interview is broadcast, Chris attempts to discipline the boy and they quarrel. Chris’s manager, Manzini, suggests Job be sent back to the military academy. That night Chris sneaks into Job’s room and removes the boy’s military uniforms and replaces them with “civilian” clothes. As the tour continues, Job remains aloof, and Chris grows increasingly frustrated. One night, “Animal,” a member of Chris’s road crew, takes Job to a roadhouse and the boy becomes intoxicated. A brawl breaks out, and the two are arrested. Manzini bails the two out of jail. Chris telephones Shelley and asks her to rejoin the tour. Later, as Job practices military strategy with tin soldiers, Chris demonstrates a surprising knowledge of military history, and asks the boy to work on the road crew. During a softball game in Tempe, Arizona, between the Dalton band and a local team, Chris’s inability to take the game seriously angers Job, and they argue. Chris orders Manzini to drop the boy at his grandparents’ home, but Shelley insists Chris do it himself. On the drive, Job mentions that Chris made him miss a summer camping trip with his school. Chris impulsively drives off the highway onto a dirt road and they camp out. In front of a campfire, they share a candy bar and discuss Job’s mother’s drug addiction. The boy breaks down and confesses how much he misses her, and pleads with Chris to allow him to return to his school. Chris responds that it is Job’s choice. Chris returns Job to the academy and invites him to join the band on tour in Europe in December. As they say goodbye, they embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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