Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? (1978)

PG | 114 mins | Comedy, Mystery | 6 October 1978

Director:

Ted Kotcheff

Writer:

Peter Stone

Producer:

William Aldrich

Cinematographer:

John Alcott

Editor:

Thom Noble

Production Designer:

Rolf Zehetbauer

Production Companies:

Aldrich Company, Lorimar
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HISTORY

The film’s opening credits appear over fancy place settings. After the end credits, the following text appears: “The Producers wish to express their appreciation for the opportunity of photographing the following: Cipriani Hotel, Venice, Italy; Guggenheim Museum, Venice, Italy; Hotel Danieli, Venice, Italy; Venice Fishmarket, Venice, Italy; Maxim’s Restaurant, Paris, France; Restaurant Pre Catelan, Paris, France; The New Lido Restaurant, Paris, France; Restaurant Laperouse, Paris, France; Restaurant Lucas Carton, Paris, France; Restaurant Faugeron, Paris, France; Restaurant Tour d’Argent, Paris, France; Hyde Park Hotel, London, England; The White Elephant Restaurant, London, England; The Café Royal, London, England.”
       The movie derived its working title from the novel upon which it was based, Someone Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe. However, according to a statement from producer William Aldrich in a 21 Sep 1978 DV article, Warner Bros., Inc. wanted the name of the film changed to Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? in order to avoid confusion with a movie that Columbia Pictures released that same year, titled Somebody Killed Her Husband (1978, see entry).
       Contemporary sources noted the differences between the film and its source material. An article in the 12 Sep 1977 LAT reported that the movie’s emphasis on deducing, then revealing the identity of the murderer at the end of the story is a departure from the novel, which named the killer at the beginning, then traced how the murders were committed. The filmmakers also chose a different character to be the killer than that identified in the book, according to a 20 Sep 1978 news item in Var. ... More Less

The film’s opening credits appear over fancy place settings. After the end credits, the following text appears: “The Producers wish to express their appreciation for the opportunity of photographing the following: Cipriani Hotel, Venice, Italy; Guggenheim Museum, Venice, Italy; Hotel Danieli, Venice, Italy; Venice Fishmarket, Venice, Italy; Maxim’s Restaurant, Paris, France; Restaurant Pre Catelan, Paris, France; The New Lido Restaurant, Paris, France; Restaurant Laperouse, Paris, France; Restaurant Lucas Carton, Paris, France; Restaurant Faugeron, Paris, France; Restaurant Tour d’Argent, Paris, France; Hyde Park Hotel, London, England; The White Elephant Restaurant, London, England; The Café Royal, London, England.”
       The movie derived its working title from the novel upon which it was based, Someone Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe. However, according to a statement from producer William Aldrich in a 21 Sep 1978 DV article, Warner Bros., Inc. wanted the name of the film changed to Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? in order to avoid confusion with a movie that Columbia Pictures released that same year, titled Somebody Killed Her Husband (1978, see entry).
       Contemporary sources noted the differences between the film and its source material. An article in the 12 Sep 1977 LAT reported that the movie’s emphasis on deducing, then revealing the identity of the murderer at the end of the story is a departure from the novel, which named the killer at the beginning, then traced how the murders were committed. The filmmakers also chose a different character to be the killer than that identified in the book, according to a 20 Sep 1978 news item in Var.
       In production notes from AMPAS library files, the character “Grandvilliers” is alternately spelled “Grandeville.” Var reported on 23 Nov 1977 that German actor Gerhard Ammann was joining the cast and on 8 Nov 1978 that Molly-Ann Leikin wrote the lyrics to the movie’s theme music, but neither are credited onscreen. A character called “Sergeant Flemiste” appears in the film but no actor with that role name appears in the onscreen credits. An acclaimed French chef named Paul Bocuse was hired as a technical advisor to ensure that the food looked accurate and appetizing onscreen, according to a news brief in Var on 23 Nov 1977 and an article in the 30 Sep-13 Oct 1978 Cue. However, Bocuse is not listed in the credits. Actor Luigi Proietti’s name is misspelled Juigi Proietti in the end credits.
       On 20 Mar 1975, DV announced that producer Hugh French acquired the feature film rights to the manuscript Someone is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe. Later that year, as reported in the 14 May 1975 Var and the 15 May 1975 DV , Paramount Pictures purchased the project’s distribution rights and announced that the film would begin shooting in late 1975. Although sources including the 8 Aug 1975 DV and the 20 Jan 1976 HR stated that Milos Forman would direct the film, according to an article in the 15 Sep 1976 Var, Forman “said he had only indicated interest in the project.” Subsequent statements in a Nov 1976 HR article and the 11 Jul 1977 DV revealed that Paramount, French and Forman were no longer connected to the film and that Robert Aldrich and Lorimar Productions had acquired the novel’s film rights. Warner Bros.’s acquisition of the film’s domestic distribution rights was announced in DV on 8 Dec 1977 and in HR on 21 Dec 1977.
       While news items in the 12 Sep 1977 LAT and the 20 Sep 1977 HR reported that Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? would start shooting on 10 Oct 1977, DV stated on 28 Sep 1977 that production on the film would begin 12 Oct 1977 in Munich, Germany. On 5 Oct 1977, a full-page advertisement in DV announced that principal photography would start 17 Oct 1977 in “London, Paris, Munich and Venice,” and on 17 Oct 1977, a HR news brief reported filming started that day in Munich at Bavaria Film Studios.
       According to production files and a 6 Dec 1977 article in HR, principal photography in Venice and on the island of Torcello, Italy, began Nov 1977 and utilized locations at seafood restaurant Locanda Cipriani, Hotel Danieli, Rialto Bridge, St. Mark’s Square and the Grand Canal. On 9 Nov 1977, Var stated the production had moved to Paris, France, where it shot on location at the Plaza Athenée Hotel and in restaurants such as Le Pre Catelan, Maxim’s, the Tour d’Argent, Lapérouse, Lucas Carton, Faugeron and the New Lido, whose kitchen doubled for the one at Buckingham Palace. Shooting in England as of 6 Dec 1977, according to that day’s HR, the film used London locations including Café Royale, Hyde Park Hotel, Ladbrokes Club, Heathrow Airport and Park Lane. By 15 Dec 1977, production had returned to Munich for two weeks to complete principal photography, according to a news brief in HR that day, with production files stating that the Munich scenes were shot at the Bavaria Film Studios. On 21 Dec 1977, a full-page advertisement in HR announced the completion of principal photography and the movie’s planned Oct 1978 release.
       Although Lorimar was initially the sole financier of the film’s $6 million budget, producer Merv Adelson hoped to raise a minimum of fifty percent of the budget from foreign partners who were interested in pre-buying Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? for their territories, according to DV on 19 Jan 1977. On 21 Oct 1977, DV updated the budget figure to $6.8 million and stated that the film was financed by Bavaria-Geria. An article in the 14 Dec 1977 Var reported the movie was made for $7 million and that forty-five percent of the budget came from Lorimar, five percent from Bavaria Films and fifty percent from “German tax shelter financing via Geria.”
       According to Cue, the film’s food budget was $180,000, with $3000 of that applied to the Venice fish market scene alone.
       Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? opened on 6 Oct 1978 in Los Angeles, CA, at the National Theatre in Westwood and the Vogue Theatre in Hollywood, according to a news brief in the 22 Sep 1978 DV and an undated Warner Bros. press release.
       One notable factor among many reviews was the use of food-related metaphors to describe the film. On 9 Oct 1978, Box called the film a “well-spiced romantic comedy,” the Dec 1978 Cosmopolitan called it “good enough to eat,” and the 9 Oct 1978 Newsweek labeled the movie “a wonderfully frivolous concoction – as tasty as la bombe Richelieu, and not at all fattening.”
       While the Box review found that the murder comedy provided “plenty of laughs and thrills, a top cast, gorgeous sets and photography and expert music” and a “witty and clever screenplay,” and the Var critic wrote on 20 Sep 1978 that the film was “as happy a combination of the macabre and the merry as the screen has seen in a long, long time,” the 6 Oct 1978 review in NYT called it “an uneasy mix . . . of broad comedy and murder rampant,” and the 6 Oct 1978 LAHExam noted that “for a confection like this to work, the murders have to be comically stylized.”
       Although the review in New York on 16 Oct 1978 took exception to the film’s lighting and photography and criticized the film for “[going] in for slam-bang farce when delicate satire would have made the central conceit work better,” the critic still recommended the movie based on the strength of Robert Morley’s performance. LAHExam also declared that the film’s best attribute was Morley, who “[gave] his best stuffy lines a pungent snap.” The Oct 1978 IFJ described Morley as a “real treat . . . who has a field day with the best lines scripter Peter Stone provides. He’s irresistibly good.”
       The performance that received the most criticism was George Segal’s. In the 13 Nov 1978 New Yorker, the reviewer found that, ”when [Segal] mugs cheerfulness we don’t believe it . . . he just can’t be accepted as a romantic funnyman hero,” while LAHExam lamented that “the only torment that Segal expresses now is the torment of a gifted actor getting rich off his own profligacy,” and New York criticized Segal for “[turning] on the brazen smirk that he usually reserves for TV talk shows.”
       According to an advertisement in the 31 Jan 1981 TV Guide, the movie would debut on network television 3 Feb 1981 on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).
       On 13 Sep 2006, DV announced that Warner Bros. Pictures planned to remake the film with the title Who Is Killing the Great Chefs and set it in Las Vegas, Nevada. The article reported that Eric L. Gold would produce, David A. Goodman would write the script and Oliver Platt would star as a food critic suspected of committing the murders. However, as of Apr 2013, the remake had not gone into production. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Apr 1975.
---
Box Office
16 Feb 1976.
---
Box Office
11 Oct 1976.
---
Box Office
28 Nov 1977.
---
Box Office
9 Oct 1978.
---
Cosmopolitan
Dec 1978.
---
Cue
30 Sep-13 Oct 1978
p. 24, 26.
Daily Variety
20 Mar 1975.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 1975.
---
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1975.
---
Daily Variety
8 Oct 1975.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jan 1977
p. 1, 8.
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1977.
---
Daily Variety
11 Jul 1977
p. 1, 7.
Daily Variety
28 Sep 1977.
---
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1977
pp. 8-9.
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1977.
---
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1977.
---
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1977.
---
Daily Variety
16 May 1978
p. 216.
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1978.
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1978.
---
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1978
p. 3, 7.
Daily Variety
21 Sep 1978
p. 3.
Daily Variety
22 Sep 1978.
---
Daily Variety
6 Oct 1978.
---
Daily Variety
13 Dec 1978.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1979.
---
Daily Variety
13 Sep 2006.
---
Films in Review
Nov 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
Nov 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Nov 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Dec 1977
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1978
p. 30.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1978
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1978
p. 1, 5.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1978.
---
Independent Film Journal
Oct 1978.
---
LAHExam
3 Jun 1975.
---
LAHExam
14 Aug 1975.
---
LAHExam
23 Apr 1977.
---
LAHExam
8 Dec 1977.
---
LAHExam
10 Jan 1978.
---
LAHExam
6 Oct 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Aug 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Sep 1977
Section IV, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
31 Oct 1977.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Jan 1978
Calendar, p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1978
p. 19.
Motion Picture Product Digest
18 Oct 1978.
---
New York
16 Oct 1978.
---
New York Times
6 Oct 1978.
---
New York Times
1 Sep 1994.
---
New Yorker
13 Nov 1978.
---
Newsweek
28 Nov 1977.
---
Newsweek
9 Oct 1978
p. 94.
Newsweek
30 Oct 1978.
---
Triad Magazine
Nov 1978
p. 27.
TV Guide
31 Jan 1981.
---
Variety
14 May 1975.
---
Variety
13 Aug 1975.
---
Variety
12 Mar 1976.
---
Variety
15 Sep 1976.
---
Variety
19 Oct 1977.
---
Variety
9 Nov 1977.
---
Variety
23 Nov 1977.
---
Variety
14 Dec 1977.
---
Variety
21 Dec 1977.
---
Variety
5 Apr 1978.
---
Variety
24 May 1978.
---
Variety
20 Sep 1978
p. 24.
Variety
8 Nov 1978.
---
Village Voice
9 Oct 1978.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Lorimar presents
In association with Geria Productions; Bavaria Films
A Ted Kotcheff film
An Aldrich Company/Lorimar production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
Italian asst dir
French unit mgr
French unit mgr
French asst dir
English prod mgr
English asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Elec gaffer
Still photog
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
English art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Assoc film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop buyer
French set dresser
English prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
MAKEUP
Hairdresser for Miss Bisset
Makeup for Mr. Segal
Makeup artist
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Lorimar prod exec
Bavaria prod exec
Prod supv
Prod asst
Asst to the prod
Continuity
Unit pub
Prod accountant
Loc auditor
Casting for Lorimar
Italian loc mgr
Italian casting dir
English prod asst
English casting dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Someone Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe By Nan and Ivan Lyons (New York, 1976).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Someone Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe
Release Date:
6 October 1978
Premiere Information:
World premiere: 5 October 1978 at the National Theatre in Westwood, CA
Los Angeles opening: 6 October 1978
New York opening: week of 6 October 1978
Production Date:
17 October--mid December 1977 in Munich, Germany
November 1977 in Venice, Italy, and Paris, France
early December 1977 in London, England
Copyright Claimant:
N. F. Geria 2d, Filmgesellschaft m.b.H.
Copyright Date:
5 March 1979
Copyright Number:
PA28979
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Arriflex; Prints by MGM Lab, Inc.
Duration(in mins):
114
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
Germany (West), United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Max Vandervere, the obese editor of British gourmet food magazine Epicurus, learns from his doctor that if he does not change his eating habits and reduce his weight by half, he will die within six months. Unsure whether it is worth living if he cannot continue eating what he wants, Max asks his longtime secretary, Beecham, to take him to his favorite restaurant for lunch. Elsewhere in London, England, American fast food franchiser Robby Ross scouts locations for his latest restaurant venture as his ex-wife, world-renowned dessert chef Natasha O’Brien, arrives at Heathrow Airport. Using subterfuge to arrange a meeting with Natasha, Robby pitches his plan to open a chain of specialty omelette restaurants called “H. Dumpty,” but she scoffs at his idea and turns down his request to manage the restaurants. After eating lunch, Max and the restaurant’s chef, Louis Kohner, discuss their recent collaboration: in the latest issue of Epicurus, Max named Louis, Natasha and two other chefs the best in the world, then proclaimed that a four-course feast comprised of each chef’s culinary specialty would constitute the world’s most fabulous meal. Max has arranged for Louis and Natasha to make their dishes for the Queen of England that night. Just then, French chef Auguste Grandvilliers bursts in, accusing Max of ruining him because the editor did not choose him as one of the four greatest chefs. Grandvilliers is dragged away threatening to kill Louis. Later, Natasha meets with Max, who takes her to the ... +


Max Vandervere, the obese editor of British gourmet food magazine Epicurus, learns from his doctor that if he does not change his eating habits and reduce his weight by half, he will die within six months. Unsure whether it is worth living if he cannot continue eating what he wants, Max asks his longtime secretary, Beecham, to take him to his favorite restaurant for lunch. Elsewhere in London, England, American fast food franchiser Robby Ross scouts locations for his latest restaurant venture as his ex-wife, world-renowned dessert chef Natasha O’Brien, arrives at Heathrow Airport. Using subterfuge to arrange a meeting with Natasha, Robby pitches his plan to open a chain of specialty omelette restaurants called “H. Dumpty,” but she scoffs at his idea and turns down his request to manage the restaurants. After eating lunch, Max and the restaurant’s chef, Louis Kohner, discuss their recent collaboration: in the latest issue of Epicurus, Max named Louis, Natasha and two other chefs the best in the world, then proclaimed that a four-course feast comprised of each chef’s culinary specialty would constitute the world’s most fabulous meal. Max has arranged for Louis and Natasha to make their dishes for the Queen of England that night. Just then, French chef Auguste Grandvilliers bursts in, accusing Max of ruining him because the editor did not choose him as one of the four greatest chefs. Grandvilliers is dragged away threatening to kill Louis. Later, Natasha meets with Max, who takes her to the kitchen at Buckingham Palace where she prepares her specialty, an extravagant flaming dessert called La Bombe Richelieu, and Louis makes his famous Pigeons en Croûte for the royal banquet. As the two chefs cook, Louis expresses his romantic interest in Natasha. Meanwhile, Robby asks Max to recommend a chef to be the public face of H. Dumpty and Max suggests Louis, but the men argue over Natasha. After the royal banquet, Natasha shares a meal in bed with Louis until they are interrupted by a phone call from Robby, who asks Louis to be the advising chef for H. Dumpty. Louis declines. In the morning, Natasha awakes to find Louis’s body burning in his oven. When British police Detective Inspector Blodgett questions her and learns she received a call from her ex-husband, Robby becomes the main suspect in Louis’s death. Later, Natasha and Robby meet Max, who reminds Natasha that she must go to Venice, Italy, later that day to interview the great Italian chef, Fausto Zoppi, for the magazine. In Venice, Natasha flirts with Fausto until Robby appears, trying to interest the Italian in endorsing H. Dumpty. Fausto declines, then invites Natasha to come to his restaurant later to sample his specialties: lobster and lovemaking. That evening, Natasha passes a mysterious man as she enters Fausto’s deserted restaurant. In the kitchen, Natasha discovers Fausto’s dead body submerged in water with his lobsters. Natasha faints and later finds herself in the presence of Captain Ravello of the Venice police. Although the policeman initially suspects Natasha of killing Fausto, since she was present when Louis was murdered, Ravello ultimately decides she is innocent. Later that night, Natasha gets a phone call from Robby who insists they meet in Paris, France. When Natasha acquiesces, Robby explains his theory: since the greatest chefs in England and Italy have been killed, the greatest chef in France is next. Therefore, he has arranged a meeting with the six best chefs in France. Natasha feels there is a connection between Louis and Fausto, but beside the fact that each was murdered in the style of his own specialty, she cannot quite figure out the mystery. As the meeting starts, Natasha is reunited with Jean-Claude Moulineau, her mentor, and Grandvilliers appears unexpectedly, claiming to be the next victim. When Natasha recognizes Grandvilliers as the man she saw in Venice, he admits that he followed Louis and Fausto, hoping to discredit them as the world’s greatest chefs. When Robby resumes the meeting, Moulineau asks his fellow chefs which scenario they find worse: to be killed for being the best or to be passed over for not being good enough. In London, Max makes plans to fly to Paris for Moulineau’s famous pressed duck recipe and phones Natasha to remind her she will be appearing on a British television cooking show. During the call, Max laments that the chefs behind one half of “the world’s most fabulous meal” are now gone and Natasha realizes the connection between Louis and Fausto: both men created a dish in Epicurus’s most fabulous meal. After her call with Max, Natasha speculates to Robby that Moulineau is next to be killed and she will be the last victim, then suspects that Grandvilliers is the murderer because he was left off the list. Robby gets a call from Grandvilliers, who claims someone is stalking him in his restaurant. Robby and Natasha rush to the restaurant and find the chef unconscious, hanging in the freezer. Robby concludes that since the next intended victim was Grandvilliers, not Moulineau, Grandvilliers cannot be the killer, so Natasha is wrong about the murderer pursuing only the Epicurus chefs and she is not the next target. At dinner, Robby asks Natasha to come back to him but she declines. The next morning, Max visits Moulineau and as the chef demonstrates how he makes his pressed duck, the editor expresses regret that despite his diet, he cannot resist the cooking of the world’s best chefs. Meanwhile, at the hotel, Robby frolics in the bath with Natasha until they are interrupted by the French police. Inspector Henri Salpetre reveals that Grandvilliers confessed to staging his own attempted murder in order to salvage his reputation. Natasha guesses that Salpetre is questioning them because Moulineau has been murdered and the inspector confirms that the chef’s head was placed in a duck press and crushed. Natasha broods about being the killer’s next victim until Robby reminds her what he loves about her. He asks her to remarry him but before she answers, Natasha remembers she must return to London for the cooking show and she and Robby race to the airport. In London, Max insists that Natasha stay with him for safety’s sake. Later, Max and Robby watch Natasha prepare two versions of La Bombe Richelieu for the television show. In the middle of the night, someone tampers with one of the desserts. The next morning, Robby assures Natasha he is staying with her until the killer is apprehended. When Max exhorts Natasha to get ready for the television show, Robby informs him she is canceling all public appearances while the killer is free. Max learns from Beecham that Grandvilliers confessed to the three murders. Since Natasha is now free to appear on the television program, Robby decides to leave on business. As Robby heads to the airport, he watches Natasha on the live broadcast of the cooking show and realizes that La Bombe Richelieu probably contains a bomb. When he phones Blodgett with this news, the inspector informs Robby that he never told anyone that Grandvilliers confessed to the murders. Robby rushes to the studio and arrives on set just as Natasha lights the dessert. He tosses it in a far corner and tells everyone to duck. When nothing happens, Natasha berates Robby for ruining the broadcast, but La Bombe Richelieu explodes, flinging cake and icing on everyone in the studio. In the confusion, Max slips away. As Natasha thanks Robby for saving her life and asks who planted the bomb, Robby announces the killer is Max. Robby, Natasha and Blodgett find Max at a restaurant dining on his favorite dishes, claiming he could not resist the chefs’ specialties so he had to kill the men and women who created them. Max then slumps over and a policeman pronounces him dead. As Blodgett announces the case closed, Max’s assistant, Beecham, confesses that she had always loved Max; since the chefs’ cooking was killing him, she committed the murders to save his life. Max unexpectedly rouses. Sometime later, Robby and Natasha get remarried in his new H. Dumpty restaurant. A disgusted Max turns away from the ceremony and resumes eating an enormous plate of food, muttering, “I knew that divorce was too good to last.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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