Micki + Maude (1984)

PG-13 | 120 mins | Comedy | 21 December 1984

Director:

Blake Edwards

Producer:

Tony Adams

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Production Designer:

Rodger Maus

Production Company:

Blake Edwards Entertainment
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HISTORY

Micki + Maude reunited director Blake Edwards and actor Dudley Moore, five years after their hit 10 (1979, see entry). Unlike most of Edwards’ previous productions, he did not originate the script, which represented playwright Jonathan Reynolds’ screenwriting debut. As explained in a 21 Dec 1984 NYT interview, Reynolds was initially concerned that the concept, about a bigamist with two pregnant wives, was “unworkable.” To give “Rob Salinger” more appeal, Reynolds emphasized the character’s affection for children and his devotion to his two marriages. Reynolds also noted that Blake Edwards contributed more sweetness to the script, reduced the farce’s brisk pace, and moved the setting from New York City to Los Angeles, CA, where shooting was less expensive.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that the role of “Micki Salinger” marked Ann Reinking’s first time playing a non-dancing character in a feature film.
       According to a 30 Mar 1984 Columbia Pictures press release, principal photography was set to begin 2 Apr 1984 on location in Los Angeles and on soundstages at Laird Studios in Culver City, CA. Call sheets in AMPAS library files indicate that the production was also scheduled to film on soundstages at Culver City’s GMT Studios and on location at Holmby Park, the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, CA, and in Malibu, CA.
       An 18 Sep 1984 LAHExam brief reported that Blake Edwards changed “Mickey” to “Micki” in the title to convey that Micki was female. As noted in HR briefs from 15 Aug 1984 and 30 Aug 1984, Columbia Pictures considered opening the picture around Easter 1985, before ... More Less

Micki + Maude reunited director Blake Edwards and actor Dudley Moore, five years after their hit 10 (1979, see entry). Unlike most of Edwards’ previous productions, he did not originate the script, which represented playwright Jonathan Reynolds’ screenwriting debut. As explained in a 21 Dec 1984 NYT interview, Reynolds was initially concerned that the concept, about a bigamist with two pregnant wives, was “unworkable.” To give “Rob Salinger” more appeal, Reynolds emphasized the character’s affection for children and his devotion to his two marriages. Reynolds also noted that Blake Edwards contributed more sweetness to the script, reduced the farce’s brisk pace, and moved the setting from New York City to Los Angeles, CA, where shooting was less expensive.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that the role of “Micki Salinger” marked Ann Reinking’s first time playing a non-dancing character in a feature film.
       According to a 30 Mar 1984 Columbia Pictures press release, principal photography was set to begin 2 Apr 1984 on location in Los Angeles and on soundstages at Laird Studios in Culver City, CA. Call sheets in AMPAS library files indicate that the production was also scheduled to film on soundstages at Culver City’s GMT Studios and on location at Holmby Park, the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, CA, and in Malibu, CA.
       An 18 Sep 1984 LAHExam brief reported that Blake Edwards changed “Mickey” to “Micki” in the title to convey that Micki was female. As noted in HR briefs from 15 Aug 1984 and 30 Aug 1984, Columbia Pictures considered opening the picture around Easter 1985, before settling on the release date of 21 Dec 1984.
       The film was nominated for a Golden Globe Award in the category of best motion picture – musical or comedy, and Dudley Moore received the Golden Globe for best performance by an actor in a motion picture – musical or comedy.
       End credits include the statement: “Cambodian music and dance performed by the Cambodian Art Preservation Group.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Aug 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Nov 1984
p. 3, 40.
LAHExam
18 Sep 1984.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1984
Section L, p. 5.
New York Times
21 Dec 1984.
---
New York Times
21 Dec 1984
p. 25.
Variety
5 Dec 1984
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Blake Edwards film
From Columbia-Delphi III Productions
From B.E.E.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Still photog
Video op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus coord
Mus coach
Addl orch by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hair des
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Dudley Moore's hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod controller
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Transportation coord
Video tech consultant
Video material prepared by
Pub relations
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt double
SOURCES
SONGS
"Something New In My Life," music by Michel Legrand, lyrics by Alan & Marilyn Bergman, performed by Stephen Bishop, produced by Spencer Proffer
"On The Sunny Side Of The Street," written by Dorothy Fields and Jimmy McHugh, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Witchcraft," written by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh, performed by Frank Sinatra, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Mickey & Maude
Mickey and Maude
Micki & Maude
Release Date:
21 December 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 21 December 1984
Production Date:
began 2 April 1984
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 February 1985
Copyright Number:
PA241486
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
120
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, Rob Salinger is dissatisfied with his job as a television newscaster for the tabloid program, America Hey! and would rather focus on starting a family. Rob loves talking to children, finding them more entertaining than the show’s frivolous topics. He has been happily married to Micki, a successful attorney, for seven years, but she wants to postpone having children because of her upcoming appointment to become a Superior Court judge. Rob is frustrated that he is unable to persuade his wife to reconsider. While on assignment covering a Cambodian string quartet, Rob interviews an attractive cellist named Maude Guillory, and later attends her concert after his wife, Micki, cancels their dinner plans. During a reception following the concert, the two become intoxicated and flirt with each other. For the first time in his marriage, Rob cheats on his wife and continues a love affair with Maude, while Micki remains preoccupied with her work. When Maude announces she is pregnant, Rob does not want to leave her and proposes marriage, promising he will get a divorce. Maude introduces Rob to her father, Barkhas Guillory, a professional wrestler who is thrilled about the marriage and offers to buy the couple a house. However, Rob fears the consequences if the conservative Mr. Guillory and his intimidating wrestling friends discover Rob is already married and Maude is pregnant. Rob confides to his friend and boss, Leo Brody, that he is conflicted about asking for a divorce and loves both women. Before Rob has a chance to break the news to ... +


In Los Angeles, California, Rob Salinger is dissatisfied with his job as a television newscaster for the tabloid program, America Hey! and would rather focus on starting a family. Rob loves talking to children, finding them more entertaining than the show’s frivolous topics. He has been happily married to Micki, a successful attorney, for seven years, but she wants to postpone having children because of her upcoming appointment to become a Superior Court judge. Rob is frustrated that he is unable to persuade his wife to reconsider. While on assignment covering a Cambodian string quartet, Rob interviews an attractive cellist named Maude Guillory, and later attends her concert after his wife, Micki, cancels their dinner plans. During a reception following the concert, the two become intoxicated and flirt with each other. For the first time in his marriage, Rob cheats on his wife and continues a love affair with Maude, while Micki remains preoccupied with her work. When Maude announces she is pregnant, Rob does not want to leave her and proposes marriage, promising he will get a divorce. Maude introduces Rob to her father, Barkhas Guillory, a professional wrestler who is thrilled about the marriage and offers to buy the couple a house. However, Rob fears the consequences if the conservative Mr. Guillory and his intimidating wrestling friends discover Rob is already married and Maude is pregnant. Rob confides to his friend and boss, Leo Brody, that he is conflicted about asking for a divorce and loves both women. Before Rob has a chance to break the news to Micki, she reveals she is also pregnant. With a change of heart, she declares she is taking a break from work and is happy to be having a child with the man she loves. Rob feels he has no choice but remain married to Micki, while proceeding with his wedding to Maude. Because of Micki’s previous miscarriage, the doctor recommends bed rest during her pregnancy, and Rob does not want to risk her health by revealing the truth. Meanwhile, he lies to Maude, telling her he got a quick divorce in Tijuana, Mexico. Thanks to a flexible work schedule and Leo’s cooperation, Rob is able to divide his time between both pregnant wives without either suspecting his deception. He even avoids getting caught when Micki and Maude both arrive for check-ups at the same clinic. However, the situation becomes increasingly stressful, and one day at work, Rob flies into a rage. Although Micki and Maude have different due dates, they go into labor on the same day. Rob dashes between their rooms in the maternity ward, while trying to explain to his wives why there are two Mrs. Salingers at the hospital about to give birth. On the way to the delivery room, Rob is unable to keep the secret any longer, and both women finally realize the reason for his strange behavior. After the babies are born, Micki and Maude meet with Rob together to declare they want divorces immediately and that he will never be allowed to visit the children. If he does not abide, they will report his bigamy to police. As Rob sneaks around trying to catch glimpses of the newborns, Micki eventually relents and agrees to take him back if he does not inform Maude. However, Maude proposes a similar arrangement. Once again, Leo advises Rob that he cannot maintain two relationships. Sometime in the future, Micki and Maude’s careers thrive, while Rob is content to babysit his growing number of children. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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