Where the Boys Are (1984)

R | 95 mins | Romantic comedy | 6 April 1984

Director:

Hy Averback

Producer:

Allan Carr

Cinematographer:

James A. Contner

Production Designer:

Michael Baugh

Production Company:

ITC Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Promotions by Associated Film Promotions/AFP Inc., Robert H. Kovoloff, President”; “Classic automobiles courtesy of Bradford Motorcars, Inc. of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida”; “Automobiles supplied by Ford Motor Company”; “Cadillac convertible courtesy of Cadillac Motor Car Division, General Motors Corporation.” End credits also state: “Special thanks to Broward County and the residents of Ft. Lauderdale and Boca Raton, Florida for their cooperation and hospitality,” and “A special thanks to Pan Am® for their contribution and cooperation.”
       On 19 Feb 1982, the DV column “Just for Variety” announced producer Allan Carr was preparing a remake of the 1960 film, Where the Boys Are (see entry). Carr planned to include members of the original cast such as Connie Francis and Paula Prentiss as well as young actors with whom he had previously collaborated, Michelle Pfeiffer, Lorna Luft, and Patrick Cassidy. Actor Timothy Hutton, son of Jim Hutton, who was featured in the 1960 version, was approached to star. Referring to the working title, Where the Boys Are Now, the 21 Apr 1982 Var reported the project would be directed by Stan Dragoti for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), the studio behind the original, and added Ursula Andress as one of the actors “under discussion.” The article also mentioned singer Tina Turner as a possible contributor to the music. However, by the time filming got underway in 1983, Allan Carr and Lorna Luft were the only names who remained with the project.
       The 5 May 1983 HR revealed that Carr and ITC Productions jointly purchased the rights from MGM, and ITC would finance the ... More Less

End credits include the following acknowledgments: “Promotions by Associated Film Promotions/AFP Inc., Robert H. Kovoloff, President”; “Classic automobiles courtesy of Bradford Motorcars, Inc. of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida”; “Automobiles supplied by Ford Motor Company”; “Cadillac convertible courtesy of Cadillac Motor Car Division, General Motors Corporation.” End credits also state: “Special thanks to Broward County and the residents of Ft. Lauderdale and Boca Raton, Florida for their cooperation and hospitality,” and “A special thanks to Pan Am® for their contribution and cooperation.”
       On 19 Feb 1982, the DV column “Just for Variety” announced producer Allan Carr was preparing a remake of the 1960 film, Where the Boys Are (see entry). Carr planned to include members of the original cast such as Connie Francis and Paula Prentiss as well as young actors with whom he had previously collaborated, Michelle Pfeiffer, Lorna Luft, and Patrick Cassidy. Actor Timothy Hutton, son of Jim Hutton, who was featured in the 1960 version, was approached to star. Referring to the working title, Where the Boys Are Now, the 21 Apr 1982 Var reported the project would be directed by Stan Dragoti for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), the studio behind the original, and added Ursula Andress as one of the actors “under discussion.” The article also mentioned singer Tina Turner as a possible contributor to the music. However, by the time filming got underway in 1983, Allan Carr and Lorna Luft were the only names who remained with the project.
       The 5 May 1983 HR revealed that Carr and ITC Productions jointly purchased the rights from MGM, and ITC would finance the project for “under $5 million.” The article noted Carr was one of the story co-writers, along with Stu Krieger and Jeff Burkhart, but the producer does not receive an onscreen writing credit. Carr remarked that the 1984 version was neither a remake nor a sequel, but indicated he would provide a “‘dedication to’” the 1960 film. In a 12 May 1983 DV brief, Carr added that Joe Pasternak, producer of the original, would receive an “onscreen dedication.” However, neither Pasternak nor the 1960 film are acknowledged in the onscreen credits.
       According to an 18 May 1983 HR item, principal photography began 16 May 1983 and was scheduled for six weeks on location in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
       As stated in a 15 Feb 1984 LAT article, the film marked the debut release for newly-launched Tri-Star Pictures, a partnership of Columbia Pictures, CBS-TV, and Home Box Office (HBO). Although The Natural (1984, see entry) was originally planned as the first film to carry the Tri-Star logo, the article speculated that Where the Boys Are allowed the fledgling company to “work out any kinks” on a less prestigious picture. Tri-Star negotiated theatrical, cable, and television network distribution rights after a deal collapsed between previous distributor Universal Pictures and the film’s financing company, ITC Films. While Carr claimed Universal backed away over corporate changes at ITC, Universal stated that the producers disagreed with the studio’s regional release strategy for the film. Tri-Star spent $6 million on the advertising campaign, reportedly more than the production budget.
       The 27 Jul 1984 DV indicated that the film’s box-office performance was disappointing, grossing “just under $12 million” since its 6 Apr 1984 opening. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Feb 1982.
---
Daily Variety
12 May 1983.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1983
p. 1, 13.
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1984
p. 8, 58.
Los Angeles Times
15 Feb 1984
Section G, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
9 Apr 1984
Section C, p. 3.
New York Times
7 Apr 1984
p. 14.
Variety
21 Apr 1982.
---
Variety
11 Apr 1984
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
from ITC Productions
An Allan Carr production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst propman
Const coord
Const foreman
"Dave" des by
COSTUMES
Fashions by
Cost coord and supv by
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus rec and mixed by
Mus supv
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd consultant
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
DANCE
Choreog and mus staging by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Florida casting
Florida casting coord
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Prod estimator
Asst to the prod
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod assoc
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Post prod supv
Regatta seq staged by
STAND INS
Stunt coord & stunt double
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stuntplayer
Stunt double
Skydiver #1
Skydiver #2
Sky diving by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel Where the Boys Are by Glendon Swarthout (New York, 1960).
SONGS
“Where The Boys Are,” composed by Howard Greenfield & Neil Sedaka, performed by Lisa Hartman, published by Screen Gems-EMI Music Inc.
“Quantum Sonata,” composed by Louis St. Louis
“Jennie,” composed by Louis St. Louis, Denis Pregnolato, Peter Beckett, performed by Peter Beckett
+
SONGS
“Where The Boys Are,” composed by Howard Greenfield & Neil Sedaka, performed by Lisa Hartman, published by Screen Gems-EMI Music Inc.
“Quantum Sonata,” composed by Louis St. Louis
“Jennie,” composed by Louis St. Louis, Denis Pregnolato, Peter Beckett, performed by Peter Beckett
“Hot Nights,” composed by Jude Cole, Vince Melamed, performed by Jude Cole
“Slow Down,” composed by Larry Williams, performed by The Rockats
“Rip It Up,” composed by Robert Blackwell, John Marascalco, performed by Jude Cole
“Be-Bop A-Lula,” composed by Gene Vincent, Tex Davis, performed by The Rockats
“Womans Wise,” composed by Dibbs Preston, performed by The Rockats
“Show No Fear,” composed by Dibbs Preston, performed by The Rockats
“All Fired Up,” composed by Sylvester Levay, Rick Derringer, performed by Rick Derringer
“Slippin’ And Slidin’,” composed by Edwin J. Bocage, Albert Collins, Richard Penniman, James Smith, performed by Phil Seymour
“Shake Me,” composed by Jake Hooker, Allan Merill, performed by Rick Derringer
“Bony Moronie,” composed by Larry Williams, performed by Jill Colucci, Ellen Schwartz, Sylvia St. James
"Seven Day Heaven,” composed by Brian Short, Allan R. Scott, performed by Shandi
“Tribute To Berry,” composed by Michael Bellotti, Ross Longo, performed by Michael Bellotti
“Mini-Skirted,” composed and performed by Sparks, courtesy of Atlantic Records
“Girls Night Out,” composed by Brian Allen, performed by Toronto, courtesy of Solid Gold Records
“Classical Fugue,” composed by A. Baker, R. Morgan
“Gas Station Boogie,” composed by Cliffie Stone
“Never Gonna Let You Go,” composed by Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil
“Summer Love,” composed by Brian Bennett, Cliff Hall
“Concerto de Classique,” composed by Don Great.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Where the Boys Are '84
Where the Boys Are Now
Release Date:
6 April 1984
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 6 April 1984
Production Date:
16 May--late June 1983
Copyright Claimant:
Tri-Star Pictures
Copyright Date:
6 June 1984
Copyright Number:
PA225697
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27302
SYNOPSIS

Four friends from Penmore College, Carole, Laurie, Sandra, and Jennie, plan to spend spring break in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Carole wants to take a separate vacation from her long-time boyfriend Chip. Laurie hopes to have a fling with a handsome man. Sandra, the elitist of the group would rather visit Bermuda than join the “debauchery” in Ft. Lauderdale, but agrees to go with her friends and introduce them to her famous cousin, Camden Roxbury III, a successful composer who will be performing a benefit piano concert there. Although Jennie has a term paper due for her classical music major, she is a fan of Camden Roxbury and decides to go. On the drive there, the women pick up a good-looking hitchhiker named Scott Nash, who is traveling to Ft. Lauderdale to promote his band, Scott Nash and the Ramblers. Arriving in the city, the group navigates through the young crowd swarming the streets. Scott thanks the women for the ride and gazes fondly at Jennie, before leaving to rendezvous with his band mates. Checking into a low-budget beachfront hotel, the girl friends are appalled by the lack of amenities and filthy room, but try to make the best of it. Sandra leaves a message for her wealthy aunt, Barbara Roxbury, who lives on an estate in Fort Lauderdale. Barbara, meanwhile, is at the airport to pick up her famous son Camden, who reminds his mother that he will be returning to St. Tropez, France, as soon as the concert is over. On the beach, police officer Ernie Grasso flirts with the four young women, and ... +


Four friends from Penmore College, Carole, Laurie, Sandra, and Jennie, plan to spend spring break in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Carole wants to take a separate vacation from her long-time boyfriend Chip. Laurie hopes to have a fling with a handsome man. Sandra, the elitist of the group would rather visit Bermuda than join the “debauchery” in Ft. Lauderdale, but agrees to go with her friends and introduce them to her famous cousin, Camden Roxbury III, a successful composer who will be performing a benefit piano concert there. Although Jennie has a term paper due for her classical music major, she is a fan of Camden Roxbury and decides to go. On the drive there, the women pick up a good-looking hitchhiker named Scott Nash, who is traveling to Ft. Lauderdale to promote his band, Scott Nash and the Ramblers. Arriving in the city, the group navigates through the young crowd swarming the streets. Scott thanks the women for the ride and gazes fondly at Jennie, before leaving to rendezvous with his band mates. Checking into a low-budget beachfront hotel, the girl friends are appalled by the lack of amenities and filthy room, but try to make the best of it. Sandra leaves a message for her wealthy aunt, Barbara Roxbury, who lives on an estate in Fort Lauderdale. Barbara, meanwhile, is at the airport to pick up her famous son Camden, who reminds his mother that he will be returning to St. Tropez, France, as soon as the concert is over. On the beach, police officer Ernie Grasso flirts with the four young women, and Sandra advises her friends to concentrate instead on dating bankers, doctors, and lawyers. That evening, the foursome plans to see Scott and his band play at the City Limits nightclub. Sandra invites Barbara and Camden to join them, but the pretentious composer complains about the crowded rock scene as soon as he arrives. When the four friends see Scott waiting tables instead of performing on stage, he explains that the club owner cancelled his band’s gig at the last minute. Scott is annoyed when Jennie is dismissive of him in front of Camden. As she discusses piano concertos with the composer, Camden is intrigued and invites Jennie to be his guest at the benefit concert. After Barbara and Camden make a brief appearance at the club and leave, the four friends are determined to have a good time and order more drinks. Jennie apologizes to Scott, and he offers to walk her back to the hotel after his shift. As the women become more intoxicated, Sandra jumps on a table and begins taking off her clothes to the applause of the crowd. Laurie pulls Sandra from the club, but on the way back to the hotel, Officer Grasso arrests the two for reckless driving and disorderly conduct. At sunrise, Jennie and Scott walk on the beach and enjoy a brief kiss before Jennie returns to her hotel. Soon, she discovers Laurie and Sandra need $200 to post bail. To raise the money, Jennie persuades Carole, a former ballet dancer, to enter a “Hot Bod” dance contest. Carole’s boyfriend, Chip, who has arrived in Ft. Lauderdale to spy on her, is shocked to see her gyrating on stage in a swimsuit. Although she tries to explain about the bail money, Chip suggests they break up. Amidst the scantily clad girls wearing bikinis, Camden arrives dressed in monogramed boating attire and invites Jennie and her friends to a cocktail party the following day. Jennie gladly accepts, making Scott jealous. Carole’s second place raises only enough money to bail out one, so Sandra and Laurie flip a coin to decide who leaves jail. When Laurie wins and walks out, Officer Grasso is sympathetic and releases Sandra as well. He tells her to call him Ernie and asks her out for coffee. After spending the day with the police officer, Sandra returns to the hotel room and tells her friends she has fallen in love, but with a married man. While smoking marijuana in their room, the friends laugh hysterically as Sandra practices kissing by using an inflatable life-size male doll named “Dave.” The next day, the friends attend the Roxbury cocktail party. Meanwhile, Laurie arrives for a date with a gorgeous man she has nicknamed “Conan,” after seeing him on the beach in a leopard-print swimsuit. However, she storms out when she discovers he is a male prostitute. After Scott advertises the location of the Roxbury party throughout Ft. Lauderdale, young partygoers ambush the estate. Scott searches the house until he finds Jennie upstairs, sitting at the piano with Camden. As the composer plays one of his works-in-progress, Scott offers advice and Camden is impressed. However, the two men argue when Camden asks to be left alone to work on his music. Scott calls him rude for dismissing Jennie as if she was the hired help. Annoyed by the behavior of both suitors, Jennie leaves the party. Scott runs after her to declare that he cares more for her than the arrogant Camden. The following day, the four friends convene on the beach, and Sandra is pleased after spending a passionate night with Ernie, while Jennie appears unsure about Scott and Camden. At the benefit concert that night, Barbara proudly introduces her son. Instead of joining her friends in the audience, Sandra stays at the hotel, waiting for Ernie. When he does not call, she drives to his house and learns he has “temporarily” reconciled with his wife. She ends their affair and arrives at the concert teary-eyed. After playing one of his familiar piano pieces, Camden introduces a new composition, “Suite for Jennie.” However, in the middle of the performance, Scott appears on stage playing a synthesizer and also dedicates a song to Jennie. He and his band drown out Camden and the composer realizes that he has no choice but to accompany them. As the audience gives the performance a standing ovation, Scott runs to Jennie and kisses her. After the concert, Chip reconciles with Carole, and Laurie surprises everyone by propositioning Camden. As the women drive back to Penmore College the next day, they find Scott hitchhiking and bring him along. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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