Armed and Dangerous (1986)

PG-13 | 88 mins | Comedy | 15 August 1986

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HISTORY

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: Board Of Public Works – City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles Fire Department, Department of Water And Power, Redken Laboratories, Inc.”
       A 20 Apr 1984 HR brief stated that producers were courting actor-comedian Eddie Murphy for their picture, but he did not appear in the final film. A 20 Mar 1985 HR news item announced that actor Dan Aykroyd would co-star with John Candy in the $15 million film with John Carpenter hired to direct. Briefs in the 12 Jun 1985 Var and 26 Jun 1985 Var stated that once Carpenter left the project, Aykroyd followed. The departures stalled the picture’s start, as producers searched for a new director.
       According to the 20 Mar 1985 HR, principal photography was tentatively scheduled to start 17 Jun 1985 in Los Angeles, CA, and New York. Cast and director changes pushed back the start date to 17 Mar 1986 in Los Angeles, as stated in a 1 Apr 1986 HR production chart. A 31 Jul 1986 DV article reported that the film was shot on location in Los Angeles on a $12.5 million budget. If filmmakers had moved the production to Chicago, IL, they would have spent $1 million less. However, there was no time in the schedule to open offices there, scout locations, and still make the established release date.
       As reported in an Oct 1986 AmCin article, the twelve-week shoot included various locations in Los Angeles County. The L. A. Sixth Street Bridge was closed for ... More Less

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: Board Of Public Works – City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles Fire Department, Department of Water And Power, Redken Laboratories, Inc.”
       A 20 Apr 1984 HR brief stated that producers were courting actor-comedian Eddie Murphy for their picture, but he did not appear in the final film. A 20 Mar 1985 HR news item announced that actor Dan Aykroyd would co-star with John Candy in the $15 million film with John Carpenter hired to direct. Briefs in the 12 Jun 1985 Var and 26 Jun 1985 Var stated that once Carpenter left the project, Aykroyd followed. The departures stalled the picture’s start, as producers searched for a new director.
       According to the 20 Mar 1985 HR, principal photography was tentatively scheduled to start 17 Jun 1985 in Los Angeles, CA, and New York. Cast and director changes pushed back the start date to 17 Mar 1986 in Los Angeles, as stated in a 1 Apr 1986 HR production chart. A 31 Jul 1986 DV article reported that the film was shot on location in Los Angeles on a $12.5 million budget. If filmmakers had moved the production to Chicago, IL, they would have spent $1 million less. However, there was no time in the schedule to open offices there, scout locations, and still make the established release date.
       As reported in an Oct 1986 AmCin article, the twelve-week shoot included various locations in Los Angeles County. The L. A. Sixth Street Bridge was closed for two days to accommodate a chase scene, and the production spent one day filming a courtroom set built for another production at The Burbank Studios. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, other locations included the Los Angeles Police Academy, the Kirkeby Estate in Beverly Hills, CA, which served as the “Clampett” family home in main titles for The Beverly Hillbillies television series (CBS, 26 Sep 1962 – 23 Mar 1971). In a Hollywood sex shop sequence, production designer, David L. Snyder, created special artwork to disguise merchandise and magazine covers that would be seen on camera so as not to negate the movie’s hoped for “PG-13” rating. The filming of a climactic chase scene started out in the warehouse district of downtown Los Angeles, through MacArthur Park, and culminated in Hollywood on the “Sunset Strip.”
       For another scene, costume designer, Deborah L. Scott, convinced the director and producers the film’s stars should be outfitted in powder-blue tuxedos. Since the suits were out of style, Scott and her colleagues searched throughout the greater Los Angeles area to find what was needed. When it came to shooting day, Eugene Levy was given John Candy’s shirt by mistake, and wore it to the set as a joke. Director Mark L. Lester appreciated the humor, and filmed Levy wearing the sloppy, oversized garment. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
31 Jul 1986
p. 2, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1986
p. 3, 12.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1986
p. 17.
New York Times
15 Aug 1986
p. 10.
Variety
12 Jun 1985.
---
Variety
26 Jun 1985.
---
Variety
20 Aug 1986
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Brian Grazer - James Keach Frostbacks Production
A Mark L. Lester Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
2d unit dir, Addl cam crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Elec best boy
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Still photog
Cam op, Addl cam crew
1st asst cam, Addl cam crew
1st asst cam, Addl cam crew
1st asst cam, Addl cam crew
Dir of photog, Addl cam crew
Cam op, Addl cam crew
1st asst cam, Addl cam crew
Arriflex cams supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec
Const coord
Set des
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv and prod by
Orig mus score by
Mus ed
Addl mus score by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles by
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Grazer
Asst to Mr. Keach
Asst to Mr. Lester
Asst to Mr. Candy
Prod auditor
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Caterer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Candy's Theme," composed and produced by Maurice White and Bill Meyers, performed by Bill Meyers.
SONGS
"Armed And Dangerous," written by Maurice White, Martin Page and Garry Glenn, produced by Maurice White, performed by Atlantic Starr
"Steppin' Into The Night," written by Garry Glenn and Dianne Quander, produced by Maurice White, performed by Cheryl Lynn
"That's The Way It Is," written, produced and performed by Michael Henderson, courtesy of EMI America Records, a Division of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Armed And Dangerous," written by Maurice White, Martin Page and Garry Glenn, produced by Maurice White, performed by Atlantic Starr
"Steppin' Into The Night," written by Garry Glenn and Dianne Quander, produced by Maurice White, performed by Cheryl Lynn
"That's The Way It Is," written, produced and performed by Michael Henderson, courtesy of EMI America Records, a Division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"She's My Man," written by Martin Degville, Tony James and Neal Whitmore, produced by Giorgio Moroder, performed by Sigue Sigue Sputnik, courtesy of EMI Records, Ltd.
"Respect, Respect, Respect," written by Dan Serafini, produced by Dan Serafini for Jack Gold Productions and Maurice White, performed by United Streets of America
"Some Kind Of Day," written by Glen Burtnick and Bill Meyers, produced by Maurice White and Bill Meyers, performed by Glen Burtnick, courtesy of A&M Records
"I Need You," written by Priscilla J. Coolidge, William Smith and Mary Unobsky, produced by Maurice White, co-produced by Robbie Buchanan, performed by Maurice White, courtesy of CBS Records
"Oye Como Va," written by Tito Puente, produced by Carl E. Jefferson and Tito Puente, performed by Tito Puente and His Latin Ensemble, courtesy of Concord Records
"The Walls Came Down (For Rock 'N' Roll)," written by Martin Page, produced by Maurice White and Bill Meyers, performed by Eve, courtesy of Cadenza Entertainment, Inc. and Kalimba Productions
"You're The V.I.P.," composed and produced by Michael Melvoin
"We're Dancing," composed and produced by Michael Melvoin
"Shake It Up," composed and produced by Michael Melvoin
"Our Thing," composed and produced by Michael Melvoin.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 August 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 August 1986
Production Date:
began 17 June 1985 in Los Angeles, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 September 1986
Copyright Number:
PA304539
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
88
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28208
SYNOPSIS

One night, police officer Frank Dooley catches Sergeant Rizzo and another fellow officer, committing a robbery. They try to bribe Dooley with a stolen television set, and he is framed for the crime. In court, the judge rules Frank guilty, and he is kicked off the force. Following Frank’s case, the judge reprimands a nervous attorney named Norman Kane, who tries to plea bargain a lighter sentence after being intimidated by his violent, psychotic client, who threatens to kill him if he is sent to jail. As the judge gives Kane’s client a long sentence, he tells Norman he is not suited to be a lawyer, and suggests he find a new career. At Guard Dog Security company, Capt. Clarence O’Connell delivers an orientation speech to new security guard recruits. Norman learns the company does not protect its employees from lawsuits, but Frank says that he is an ex-cop, and will help Norman steer clear of trouble. Then, Capt. Clarence O’Connell introduces union representatives, Clyde Klepper and Anthony Lazarus. Norman balks at all the mandatory fees, and questions whether it is necessary to join the union. Anthony Lazarus tells him to shut up, and fill out his paperwork. At target practice, Frank easily handles a gun, while Norman is uncomfortable with shooting, and asks Frank to be his partner. Later, shooting instructor, Maggie Cavanaugh, hands out assignments to the graduates. During the night shift at a pharmaceutical company, Bruno, the security supervisor, insists the partners take a break. Norman discovers robbers in woolen ski masks loading merchandise on to a truck. As the robbers chase Norman, he ducks in the building. Soon, the robbers shoot their machine guns at ... +


One night, police officer Frank Dooley catches Sergeant Rizzo and another fellow officer, committing a robbery. They try to bribe Dooley with a stolen television set, and he is framed for the crime. In court, the judge rules Frank guilty, and he is kicked off the force. Following Frank’s case, the judge reprimands a nervous attorney named Norman Kane, who tries to plea bargain a lighter sentence after being intimidated by his violent, psychotic client, who threatens to kill him if he is sent to jail. As the judge gives Kane’s client a long sentence, he tells Norman he is not suited to be a lawyer, and suggests he find a new career. At Guard Dog Security company, Capt. Clarence O’Connell delivers an orientation speech to new security guard recruits. Norman learns the company does not protect its employees from lawsuits, but Frank says that he is an ex-cop, and will help Norman steer clear of trouble. Then, Capt. Clarence O’Connell introduces union representatives, Clyde Klepper and Anthony Lazarus. Norman balks at all the mandatory fees, and questions whether it is necessary to join the union. Anthony Lazarus tells him to shut up, and fill out his paperwork. At target practice, Frank easily handles a gun, while Norman is uncomfortable with shooting, and asks Frank to be his partner. Later, shooting instructor, Maggie Cavanaugh, hands out assignments to the graduates. During the night shift at a pharmaceutical company, Bruno, the security supervisor, insists the partners take a break. Norman discovers robbers in woolen ski masks loading merchandise on to a truck. As the robbers chase Norman, he ducks in the building. Soon, the robbers shoot their machine guns at Frank when he appears. Frank returns fire, but then the thieves escape. Later, Frank cannot identify the criminals when Capt. O’Connell questions him. Then, O’Connell fines them each $100. Soon, they complain to Maggie Cavanaugh that they are being treated like criminals, and have a few insults for O’Connell. As she leaves, Maggie reveals that O’Connell is her father. Later, Norman and Frank attend a union meeting. There, Norman complains about being fined $100, but union boss, Michael Carlino, tells him to stop complaining and pay the fine. Then, Norman wants to know what happens to the $4 million a year in dues the union collects. Treasurer Lou Brackman describes how the union works hard to represent its members, and should not be questioned. Carlino adjourns the meeting, and warns the partners not to stir up more trouble. Soon, Norman and Frank are reassigned to a garbage dump, and Norman complains about being exposed to toxic waste. They learn that two other guards were reassigned three weeks earlier after a robbery at the pharmaceutical warehouse that also occurred when Bruno, the security supervisor, told them to go on break. Now, those guards are experiencing side effects, like lost teeth, from exposure to toxic waste, and Frank vows to investigate the security company. The next day, Frank and Norman confront Bruno at his health club. Frank chokes Bruno with exercise equipment cable until he confesses that O’Connor gave the order to send the security guards on mandatory break. Bruno chases after the partners but they escape. Later, Frank learns that Carlino runs a big crime operation that has squeezed independent criminals like Cappy, a friend and former thief,out of the business. Next, the partners meet Maggie at her home as she dresses for Carlino’s party. She tells them that Carlino lent her father the money to open Guard Dog Security, and owns some of the properties the company guards. When Frank suggests her father and Carlino might be partners in crime, Maggie rejects the accusation. She kicks the partners out of her house, and tells Norman that she is disappointed in him. Later, Frank and Norman meet their dates at a bar, where they fight with Sergeant Rizzo and his corrupt sidekick, after being taunted about their security guard jobs. Afterward, the partners and their dates crash Carlino’s party. There, O’Connor refuses to tell his daughter, Maggie, if he is involved in robberies with Carlino. Meanwhile, the partners hide in a steam room near the swimming pool and overhear a conversation in which Lou Brackman informs Carlino that, per his request, the union pension and welfare fund has been converted into cash and negotiable bonds. Carlino claims the $11 million is for a deal with a South American outfit. He wants Lou to transport the cash by armored car to a bank in Riverside, California, and mentions that a robbery is planned before the car gets to its destination. Lou becomes nervous, but Carlino says that insurance will cover the loss. However, Lou points out that insurance investigators will grill him about the illegal activity, and pleads with Carlino to call off the heist. Carlino pretends to change his mind, but gives his bodyguards the signal to execute Lou. A gunfight breaks out in front of the mansion. The partners try to save Lou, but he is shot dead. Frank and Norman escape in a car. Klepper and Lazarus give chase, until they crash. Soon, Sergeant Rizzo and his corrupt sidekick pursue Frank and Norman, who escape on foot after they also crash their car on Sunset Boulevard, and visit a sex shop frequented by bikers. When the officers arrive, the partners evade them by watching the peep show in the back of the store. Soon, they disguise themselves as a biker and a drag queen, borrowing outfits from other patrons. They have a conversation with the officers on the sidewalk, and walk off unrecognized. Maggie secretly meets them, and agrees to assign Norman to drive Carlino’s armored car. This way, Frank can ambush Carlino and his men before they can collect the money. As Carlino and O’Connor firm up their plans, O’Connor does not want his men hurt, but Carlino warns him to mind his own business. Norman is surprised as Maggie joins him in the armored car. Klepper and Lazarus soon follow. Meanwhile, Frank’s motorcycle breaks down, and he travels on foot when he cannot get anyone to loan him an automobile. Norman and Maggie evade Klepper and Lazarus but Carlino, Sergeant Rizzo, and his accomplice soon continue the pursuit. However, when they crash into the armored car, they are surprised to find the driver is Capt. O’Connor. Elsewhere, Frank finally finds a rocket fuel tanker driver to chauffeur him to his rendezvous point. As all the parties converge, Carlino’s man, disguised as an ice cream truck driver, directs a fire thrower at the armored car but misses and hits the rocket fuel tanker, blowing it up. Klepper and Lazarus slam into the tanker with their car. Frank and the tanker driver emerge intact, and Klepper and Lazarus try to run everyone off the road. Frank shoots their tires, and their car flips and crashes. As other officers arrive, Carlino is arrested, and the police captain, Frank’s former boss, promises to reinstate him on the force as a plainclothes detective. When he asks Norman if he wants a job with the police department, Norman politely declines. However, Frank thinks Norman would make a great officer and they argue about it. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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