Armed Response (1986)

R | 85 mins | Drama | 5 December 1986

Director:

Fred Olen Ray

Writer:

T. L. Lankford

Producer:

Paul Hertzberg

Cinematographer:

Paul Elliott

Editor:

Miriam Preissel

Production Designer:

Maxine Shepard

Production Company:

Cinetel Films, Inc.
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HISTORY

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Curtis Lee, Chinatown Merchants Association, City of Ontario, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks & Recreation, Film Bank, City of Los Angeles, Good Knight Bar.”
       A 11 Feb 1986 HR production chart announced that principal photography for The Jade Jungle, the film’s working title, began on 3 Feb 1986 in Los Angeles, CA. A 22 Feb 1986 Screen International brief stated the picture’s budget was $2.5 million.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated locations used for filming included Los Angeles’ Chinatown, a wild animal park in Riverside, CA, that stood in for Vietnam sequences, and parts of Ontario, CA, for stunts employing explosions and car chases.
       According to a 14 May 1992 DV news item, songwriter Sheldon Henry Lee filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles U. S. District Court, claiming producers Barry Levinson and Barry Trop took credit for his song, “Feel Me” after negotiating for its use in the movie. Cinetel Films, Inc. was also named as a defendant. Lee asked for minimum damages amounting to $20,000, and an audit of the film’s profits. The outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined. ... More Less

The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Curtis Lee, Chinatown Merchants Association, City of Ontario, County of Los Angeles Department of Parks & Recreation, Film Bank, City of Los Angeles, Good Knight Bar.”
       A 11 Feb 1986 HR production chart announced that principal photography for The Jade Jungle, the film’s working title, began on 3 Feb 1986 in Los Angeles, CA. A 22 Feb 1986 Screen International brief stated the picture’s budget was $2.5 million.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated locations used for filming included Los Angeles’ Chinatown, a wild animal park in Riverside, CA, that stood in for Vietnam sequences, and parts of Ontario, CA, for stunts employing explosions and car chases.
       According to a 14 May 1992 DV news item, songwriter Sheldon Henry Lee filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles U. S. District Court, claiming producers Barry Levinson and Barry Trop took credit for his song, “Feel Me” after negotiating for its use in the movie. Cinetel Films, Inc. was also named as a defendant. Lee asked for minimum damages amounting to $20,000, and an audit of the film’s profits. The outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 May 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Dec 1986
p. 2.
Screen International
22 Feb 1986.
---
Variety
8 Oct 1986
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Cinetel Films, Inc. Presents
A Fred Olen Ray Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Exec prod mgr
2d asst dir
Prod mgr, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Stunt cam op
Stunt cam op
Stunt cam op
Stunt cam asst
Stunt cam asst
Stunt cam asst
Gaffer
Elec best boy
Elec
Elec
Key grip
Key grip best boy
Grip
Grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dir, 2d unit
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Prop asst
Art asst
Art asst
Set const, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Ward master
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward rentals
Ward, 2d unit
MUSIC
Mus comp and performed by
Mus comp and performed by
Mus supv
Mus prod coord
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Asst sd ed
Addl sd eff ed
Re-rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff foreman
Titles anim
Opticals
Titles by
MAKEUP
Spec visual makeup eff des & created by
Spec visual makeup eff des & created by
Spec visual makeup eff des & created by
Spec visual makeup eff des & created by
Makeup eff 1st asst
Head makeup
Makeup asst
Makeup, 2d unit
Spec eff makeup, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Asst to exec prod
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation capt
Driver
Post prod supv
Firearms
Firearms, 2d unit
Craft services, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prop rentals
Prop rentals
Prop rentals
Prop rentals
Prop rentals
Extra casting by
Film permits
Honey wagons
Water trucks
Camera car
Camera car
Paramedic
Security
Security
Security
Security
Grip equip
Generators
Communications
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
“Over Night Sensation,” written by Rick Phillips, performed by Abandon Shame, produced by Rainer Portner
“Emily,” written by Jace Smith, performed by “Jace,” produced by Derick Nakamoto
“Kicks” written by Rick Phillips and Tane Caine, performed by Tane Cain, produced by Ricky Phillips, Tane Cain & Mugs Cain
+
SONGS
“Over Night Sensation,” written by Rick Phillips, performed by Abandon Shame, produced by Rainer Portner
“Emily,” written by Jace Smith, performed by “Jace,” produced by Derick Nakamoto
“Kicks” written by Rick Phillips and Tane Caine, performed by Tane Cain, produced by Ricky Phillips, Tane Cain & Mugs Cain
“Mad Hateress,” composed & performed by Tomas Chase & Steve Rucker
“Love Is Just A Heart-Beat,” written by James Saad and Jeannie Cunningham, performed by Jeannie Cunningham, produced by James Saad
“Bag Man,” composed, performed & produced by Gary Willis
“Feel Me,” written by Barry Trop and Barry Levinson, performed by The Flix, produced by Barry Trop.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Jade Jungle
Release Date:
5 December 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 5 December 1986
Production Date:
began 3 February 1986 in Los Angeles
Copyright Claimant:
Cinetel Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 October 1986
Copyright Number:
PA353150
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
85
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28310
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, Japanese Yazuka, Akira Tanaka, reprimands his son, Kon Ozu, for stealing an important jade statue, and bringing dishonor to their family. Wordlessly, Kon severs his pinky finger and offers it as an apology. Afterward, Kon and his girl friend get into their car, which explodes once she starts the engine. At the Mimosa Bar in Chinatown, Burt Roth, a retired policeman, has had too much to drink, and his sons, bartender Jim Roth, and private detective Clay Roth insist that Burt relinquish his keys. Soon, Clay’s business partner, Cory Thorton, arrives, and informs him of a meeting with Tanaka, regarding a lucrative assignment. At the meeting, Cory and Clay accept $5,000 to deliver a briefcase to thieves in exchange for the jade statue’s return. Tanaka’s henchman handcuffs Clay to the luggage, and Clay is warned that the briefcase will explode if he tries to open it without a key. At the Mimosa, Jim Roth’s wife, Sara, arrives with daughter, Lauren, to show her latest baseball trophy. Clay and Cory drive to a remote area on the outskirts of town, where thieves, Steve and Deborah, are eager to pocket the contents of the briefcase. The trade is made and Clay gets in the car, but Cory shoots Steve dead. Deborah returns fire, and is seriously wounded and left for dead. Nearby, two cars carrying reinforcements approach, and Clay uses Deborah’s machine gun to defeat them. However, Cory grabs the briefcase full of money, points his gun at Clay and says the men killed were his associates. Cory shoots Clay in the stomach, but Clay escapes in his car. From a payphone, Cory tells Tanaka their ... +


In Los Angeles, California, Japanese Yazuka, Akira Tanaka, reprimands his son, Kon Ozu, for stealing an important jade statue, and bringing dishonor to their family. Wordlessly, Kon severs his pinky finger and offers it as an apology. Afterward, Kon and his girl friend get into their car, which explodes once she starts the engine. At the Mimosa Bar in Chinatown, Burt Roth, a retired policeman, has had too much to drink, and his sons, bartender Jim Roth, and private detective Clay Roth insist that Burt relinquish his keys. Soon, Clay’s business partner, Cory Thorton, arrives, and informs him of a meeting with Tanaka, regarding a lucrative assignment. At the meeting, Cory and Clay accept $5,000 to deliver a briefcase to thieves in exchange for the jade statue’s return. Tanaka’s henchman handcuffs Clay to the luggage, and Clay is warned that the briefcase will explode if he tries to open it without a key. At the Mimosa, Jim Roth’s wife, Sara, arrives with daughter, Lauren, to show her latest baseball trophy. Clay and Cory drive to a remote area on the outskirts of town, where thieves, Steve and Deborah, are eager to pocket the contents of the briefcase. The trade is made and Clay gets in the car, but Cory shoots Steve dead. Deborah returns fire, and is seriously wounded and left for dead. Nearby, two cars carrying reinforcements approach, and Clay uses Deborah’s machine gun to defeat them. However, Cory grabs the briefcase full of money, points his gun at Clay and says the men killed were his associates. Cory shoots Clay in the stomach, but Clay escapes in his car. From a payphone, Cory tells Tanaka their plan failed. He claims Clay stole the cash and the statue, but is wounded so Tanaka can find him at a hospital or with family members. At night, Jim has nightmares, reliving his Vietnam War experiences. The next morning, Sara insists that he return to therapy for his post-traumatic stress when Clay crashes through a window, carrying the jade statue, and dies in the living room. Later, Lt. Sanderson, Burt’s former partner, takes a report, and thinks the Roths are withholding evidence. After the lieutenant leaves, Sara wants to know why the men did not tell police about the statue. Burt wants to hide the object because it is the only clue that can help find Clay’s killer. Another brother, Tommy Roth, says he will carry out his own investigation into Clay’s death. Later, Tanaka has a meeting with rival gangster, Jackie Hong, and informs him the jade statue, which was to be presented as an apology to Jackie’s uncle from Hong Kong, is missing. Hong warns him to recover the statue or risk war or prepare to commit suicide. Tanaka says he will find the statue in time for the uncle’s visit. When the Roths return home, the house is ransacked. Meanwhile, Tommy Roth breaks into Tanaka’s office. He telephones Jim, but Tanaka and his men force him to end the call. The next day, Burt arms himself and heads to the bar, while Jim looks for Cory. Tanaka tortures Tommy to learn the whereabouts of the statue, but Tommy does not crack, and claims he endured worse conditions as a soldier in Vietnam. Tommy loses consciousness, but is shot in the stomach when he wakes and tries to escape. Later, Jim finds Cory at his office around midnight. At first, Cory claims that Clay double-crossed him, but his plan backfired. When Jim does not believe him, Cory claims Clay got greedy, and hired backup, but a gun battle broke out in which Cory shot Clay by accident. Jim roughs up Cory, and insists he is lying. Then, Cory confesses that it was his plan that backfired. Clay shot his men, and he accidentally shot Clay, but never meant to kill him. Then, Jim wants to know what has happened to Tommy. For the answer, Cory tells Jim to seek out Tanaka in Chinatown. Cory knocks Jim unconscious, and escapes. Later, Tanaka’s henchman kidnaps Sara and Lauren from their home. Meanwhile, Cory thinks he has avoided trouble when Deborah, the thief, appears in the back seat of his car, points a gun at his head, and demands her money. When Jim visits Tanaka’s office, he learns Sara and Lauren are being held hostage, and Tanaka wants to exchange their lives for the statue and the money. When Jim denies having any money, Tanaka says to choose his wife or his child in exchange for the statue. Jim cannot choose, and says he will find the money but it will take time. Tanaka responds there is no time left, then Jim asks to speak with Sara. He tells his wife to be brave, and he will save her. Tanaka shows Tommy’s dead body to Jim before he leaves. When Jim and Tanaka’s man arrive at the Mimosa Bar, Burt shoots the thug dead before Jim gives him the statue. Jim says that Tommy is dead, and Tanaka plans to kill anyone in his path to get the statue. Then, Jim telephones Tanaka, and negotiates a new deal. He orders Tanaka to meet him alone with his wife and daughter at Chinatown Square in twenty minutes. If Tanaka tries anything, Jim will destroy the statue. Even though Tanaka wants his money, Jim says their deal only involves his wife and daughter for the statue. Jim and Burt load up with weapons that Jim saved from his Vietnam War days. At Chinatown Square, Burt takes custody of Sara and Lauren. He gives Sara a gun, and instructs them to hide at the Mimosa Bar. Back in the square, Tanaka demands his money, although Jim insists he never had the money. Tanaka believes Jim is a liar. A gun battle breaks out between Tanaka’s men and the Roths. After several of Tanaka’s men are killed, Jim asks his father to return to the bar to protect his family. Then, he uses his arsenal to decimate the enemy, and zeros in on Tanaka. Jim chases the gangster into an alley. He detonates an explosive he attached to the statue. Tanaka is killed and the statue destroyed. Tanaka’s primary associate escapes and evades police in a high-speed chase. He circles back to Chinatown, and crashes into the Mimosa Bar as Jim is reunited with his family. The thug open fires at Jim, who is thrown to the ground. Then, Sara grabs Jim’s machine gun and shoots the man dead. The family embraces and wonders where Cory went with the money. Jim, saved by a bulletproof vest, believes that Cory will eventually be caught. Meanwhile, Cory lies dead in his car at the bottom of a lake while hundred dollar bills float to the surface. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.