Iron Eagle (1986)

PG-13 | 119 mins | Adventure | 17 January 1986

Director:

Sidney J. Furie

Producers:

Ron Samuels, Joe Wizan

Cinematographer:

Adam Greenberg

Production Designer:

Robb Wilson King

Production Company:

Tri-Star Pictures
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HISTORY

An article in the 2 Feb 1986 LAT reported that writer-director Sidney Furie and co-writer Kevin Elders drew inspiration from the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, CA, when they first began working on their screenplay.
       According to a 31 Jul 1985 LAT article, producer Ron Samuels passed on 300 scripts before Joe Wizan, former president of 20th Century Fox motion picture division, gave him Iron Eagle to read. After finishing the script, Samuels decided to make it his next project.
       A 26 Mar 1985 HR news item stated that director Sidney Furie had considered filming in the Philippines at the end of Apr, but a 3 May 1985 DV production chart announced that principal photography began May 1985 in Israel.
       According to articles in the 2 Jun 1985 and 31 Jul 1985 LAT, filmmakers rented F-16 jet fighters on an Israeli air force base during filming. A shooting schedule of five weeks would take place in and around “regular Israeli training missions,” on a budget of $10 million. A Mar 1986 Am Cin article reported that cinematographer Frank Holgate decided to keep the use of miniatures to a minimum, during aerial sequences.        A 8 Jan 1986 HR brief announced that although the picture was not scheduled to open until 17 Jan 1986, filmmakers were already contemplating a sequel. A gala premiere was scheduled for 13 Jan 1985 in Dallas, TX.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: Frye Shoe Company, Inc., Huffy Corporation, NEC Information Systems, Inc., Nike ... More Less

An article in the 2 Feb 1986 LAT reported that writer-director Sidney Furie and co-writer Kevin Elders drew inspiration from the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, CA, when they first began working on their screenplay.
       According to a 31 Jul 1985 LAT article, producer Ron Samuels passed on 300 scripts before Joe Wizan, former president of 20th Century Fox motion picture division, gave him Iron Eagle to read. After finishing the script, Samuels decided to make it his next project.
       A 26 Mar 1985 HR news item stated that director Sidney Furie had considered filming in the Philippines at the end of Apr, but a 3 May 1985 DV production chart announced that principal photography began May 1985 in Israel.
       According to articles in the 2 Jun 1985 and 31 Jul 1985 LAT, filmmakers rented F-16 jet fighters on an Israeli air force base during filming. A shooting schedule of five weeks would take place in and around “regular Israeli training missions,” on a budget of $10 million. A Mar 1986 Am Cin article reported that cinematographer Frank Holgate decided to keep the use of miniatures to a minimum, during aerial sequences.        A 8 Jan 1986 HR brief announced that although the picture was not scheduled to open until 17 Jan 1986, filmmakers were already contemplating a sequel. A gala premiere was scheduled for 13 Jan 1985 in Dallas, TX.
       The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: Frye Shoe Company, Inc., Huffy Corporation, NEC Information Systems, Inc., Nike Incorporated.”

More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Mar 1986
pp. 44-45.
Daily Variety
3 May 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Mar 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jan 1986
p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jun 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1985
p. 1, 4.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jan 1986
p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
2 Feb 1986
p. 14, 16.
New York Times
18 Jan 1986
p. 15.
Variety
22 Jan 1986
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Tri-Star Pictures Presents
A Joe Wizan/Ron Samuels Production
A Sidney J. Furie Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, Foreign crew
3d asst dir, Foreign crew
2d unit dir, Aerial unit
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir, Aerial unit
2d asst dir - U. S., Aerial unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Asst prop master, American crew
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam, American crew
2d asst cam, American crew
Gaffer, American crew
Elec best boy, American crew
Key grip, American crew
Best boy, American crew
Still photog, American unit
Video photog, American crew
Graphic photog, American crew
Asst cam, Foreign crew
Clapper loader, Foreign crew
Gaffer, Foreign crew
Best boy, Foreign crew
Key grip, Foreign crew
Grip, Foreign crew
Still photog, Foreign crew
Aerial dir of photog, Aerial unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept supv, Foreign crew
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed, American crew
Asst film ed, American crew
Asst film ed, American crew
Asst film ed, American crew
Asst film ed, Foreign crew
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, American crew
Asst set dec, American crew
Prop master, American crew
Asst prop master, American crew
Leadman, American crew
Model const, American crew
F-16 simulator and fusilage built by, American cr
F-16 simulator and fusilage built by Image Enginee
F-16 simulator and fusilage built by Image Enginee
F-16 simulator and fusilage built by Image Enginee
F-16 simulator and fusilage built by Image Enginee
F-16 radar & monitor, American crew
F-16 radar & monitor, American crew
Draftsman, Foreign crew
Set dresser, Foreign crew
Armorer, Foreign crew
Prop master, Foreign crew
COSTUMES
Ward mistress, American crew
Military ward, American crew
Cost des, Foreign crew
Ward master, Foreign crew
Ward master, Foreign crew
MUSIC
Mus ed, American crew
Mus score rec at, American crew
Orch, American crew
Mus scoring mixer, American crew
Mus coord, American crew
Soundtrack album coord, American crew
Mus clearances by
SOUND
Supv sd ed, American crew
Sd ed, American crew
Sd ed, American crew
Sd ed, American crew
Sd ed, American crew
Sd ed, American crew
Asst sd ed, American crew
ADR ed, American crew
ADR/Foley mixer, American crew
Re-rec, American crew
Re-rec, American crew
Re-rec, American crew
Prod sd mixer, American crew
Boom op, American crew
Sd mixer, Foreign crew
Boom op, Foreign crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv, American crew
Spec eff supv, American crew
Titles by, American crew
Process coord, American crew
SPFX, Foreign crew
MAKEUP
Hair/Makeup supv, American crew
Hair/Makeup supv, American crew
Makeup artist, Foreign crew
Makeup asst, Foreign crew
Hairstylist, Foreign crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Loc mgr, American crew
Addl locs, American crew
Scr supv, American crew
Unit pub, American crew
Unit pub, American crew
Casting assoc, American crew
Extras casting, American crew
Craft services, American crew
Transportation coord, American crew
Transportation capt, American crew
Prod coord, American crew
Post prod coord, American crew
Prod accountant, American crew
Asst accountant, American crew
Prod asst, American crew
Prod asst, American crew
Prod asst, American crew
Prod asst, American crew
Prod asst, American crew
Post prod, American crew
Video graphics, American crew
Engineering consultant F-16 cockpit HUD cam, Amer
Engineering consultant F-16 cockpit HUD cam, Amer
Prod supv, Foreign crew
Loc mgr, Foreign crew
Casting, Foreign crew
Casting, Foreign crew
Crowd marshall, Foreign crew
Asst crowd marshall, Foreign crew
Camp mgr, Foreign crew
Transportation mgr, American crew
Prod asst, Foreign crew
Prod coord, Foreign crew
Prod secy, Foreign crew
Prod accountant, Foreign crew
Asst accountant, Foreign crew
Pay master, Foreign crew
Tech adv, Foreign crew
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord, American crew
Stunt coord, American crew
Spec aerial stunts - snake seq, Aerial unit
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
“One Vision,” performed and composed by Queen
“Iron Eagle (Never Say Die),” written by Duane Hitchings and Jake Hooker, performed by King Kobra
“This Raging Fire,” written by Bob Halligan, Jr., performed by The Jon Butcher Axis
+
SONGS
“One Vision,” performed and composed by Queen
“Iron Eagle (Never Say Die),” written by Duane Hitchings and Jake Hooker, performed by King Kobra
“This Raging Fire,” written by Bob Halligan, Jr., performed by The Jon Butcher Axis
“Intense,” written and performed by George Clinton
“It’s Too Late,” written by John Dexter and Paul Hackman, performed by Helix
“These Are The Good Times,” written by Myles Hunter, performed by Eric Martin
“Eyes Of The World,” written by Neal Schon, Eric Martin, Tony Fanucchi and Kevin Elson, performed by Eric Martin
“Maniac House,” written by Kimberly Rew, performed by Katrina and the Waves, courtesy of Capitol Records
“Hide In The Rainbow,” written by Ronnie James Dio and Jimmy Bain, performed by Ronnie James Dio, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“Road Of The Gypsy,” written and performed by Adrenalin
“Old Enough To Rock And Roll,” written and performed by Rainey Haynes
“Reggie’s Theme,” written and performed by Kenny Lewis, Dianne Steinberg and Gary Mallaber
“There Was A Time,” written and performed by James Brown, courtesy of Polygram Records
“Gimme Some Loving,” written by Spencer Davis, Stevie Winwood and Muff Winwood, performed by The Spencer Davis Group, courtesy of EMI America Records/ Island Records
“We’re Not Gonna Take It,” written by Dee Snider, performed by Twisted Sister, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Proud Mary,” written by John Fogerty, performed by Ike and Tina Turner, courtesy of EMI America Records.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 January 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 January 1986
Production Date:
began May 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Falcon's Flight, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 July 1987
Copyright Number:
PA338034
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Cameras and Lenses by Arriflex
Duration(in mins):
119
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28010
SYNOPSIS

During a routine training exercise, a rogue Middle Eastern nation’s MiG jets attack U. S. Air Force Colonel Ted Masters and his wingman. When the wingman’s plane sustains a hit, the colonel orders the pilot to return to Beecher Air Force base. As Col. Ted Masters fends off four MiGs, machine gun fire causes his jet fighter to spin out of control. Back in the U. S., Ted Masters’s teenage son, Doug, recklessly drives a red Mustang convertible off base to the local fast food hangout. A motorcycle gang antagonizes Doug’s girl friend, Katie, and he confronts gang leader, Knotcher, for being a jerk. However, his friends, Reggie and Tony, warn him not to pick a fight or he will end up in jail like last time. Knotcher challenges Doug to a race, but he ignores the dare. Soon, Doug’s younger brother, Matt, brings him a rejection letter from the Air Force Academy. From inside the restaurant, Knotcher uses a microphone to broadcast customers news of Doug’s failure. Through the glass partition, Doug challenges Knotcher to a fight, but the hood reminds Doug that he faces getting caught by the sheriff. It makes more sense to race. At McIntyre’s airfield, Doug plans to race “the snake,” a small engine plane, against Knotcher on his motorcycle. When Doug reaches the airfield, he finds Col. Charles “Chappy” Sinclair, a retired pilot, adjusting the snake’s engine. Chappy explains that his tinkering will prevent a stall from occurring like the one that killed another teenager named Jimmy Branson in a previous race. The competition begins on the main road, but Knotcher soon veers onto a side road. Doug avoids the mountains that ... +


During a routine training exercise, a rogue Middle Eastern nation’s MiG jets attack U. S. Air Force Colonel Ted Masters and his wingman. When the wingman’s plane sustains a hit, the colonel orders the pilot to return to Beecher Air Force base. As Col. Ted Masters fends off four MiGs, machine gun fire causes his jet fighter to spin out of control. Back in the U. S., Ted Masters’s teenage son, Doug, recklessly drives a red Mustang convertible off base to the local fast food hangout. A motorcycle gang antagonizes Doug’s girl friend, Katie, and he confronts gang leader, Knotcher, for being a jerk. However, his friends, Reggie and Tony, warn him not to pick a fight or he will end up in jail like last time. Knotcher challenges Doug to a race, but he ignores the dare. Soon, Doug’s younger brother, Matt, brings him a rejection letter from the Air Force Academy. From inside the restaurant, Knotcher uses a microphone to broadcast customers news of Doug’s failure. Through the glass partition, Doug challenges Knotcher to a fight, but the hood reminds Doug that he faces getting caught by the sheriff. It makes more sense to race. At McIntyre’s airfield, Doug plans to race “the snake,” a small engine plane, against Knotcher on his motorcycle. When Doug reaches the airfield, he finds Col. Charles “Chappy” Sinclair, a retired pilot, adjusting the snake’s engine. Chappy explains that his tinkering will prevent a stall from occurring like the one that killed another teenager named Jimmy Branson in a previous race. The competition begins on the main road, but Knotcher soon veers onto a side road. Doug avoids the mountains that killed Jimmy, but soon springs an oil leak. Reggie and Tony, following in another plane, warn Doug to land before the engine seizes. Knotcher’s cohort, Packer, riding along with the friends, admits to sabotaging the plane. Doug ignores the warning, catches up with Knotcher, and races past him. After Doug reaches the finish line, his plane skids off the runway, and crashes. Doug emerges from the plane intact, but tells Knotcher that he was almost killed because of his dirty tricks. When Knotcher claims not to hear him, Doug punches Knotcher and walks away. Another friend arrives, and alerts Doug that his father was shot down in the Mediterranean Ocean. Back at the base, Elizabeth Masters has no other information for her son. Doug insists on talking to his father’s best friend, Colonel Blackburn, to learn the truth. Blackburn shows Doug a map where his father was flying “freedom and navigation exercises” in an area in which the enemy observes a 200-mile limit for international air space. Normally, they do not interfere with Americans, but this time, they defended their territory. Doug learns that his father is being tried in a foreign court for violating territorial sovereignty. The rogue government has made a list of demands. Blackburn believes Ted Masters is being used as a bargaining chip to force the U. S. government to lift a longstanding trade embargo. Blackburn expects news of negotiations to be slow, and asks Doug to be patient. Doug tells his mother that he does not feel like attending his prom, but she encourages him to go instead of moping. Doug asks a friend, Milo Bazen, whose father works in intelligence, to update him if he learns any information about Col. Masters. At Ted Masters’s trial, Col. Akir Nakesh, the minister of defense, gives him permission to make a statement. Ted responds that he was not gathering intelligence, did not violate international law, and the trial is a fraud. At the prom, Milo informs Doug that Ted Masters’s trial is over, and Doug fears that his father will be left to rot in a foreign prison. The next day, Blackburn tells him that aside from delicate negotiations, no rescues are planned. Later, Doug persuades Marty, in the base flight simulation room, to let him practice his target skills on a flight simulator. Doug knocks out MiGs left and right until his plane is shot down at the advanced level. When Doug cuts into Chappy’s scheduled time on the simulator, they leave together. Doug quizzes Chappy to find out if an American F-16 jet fully armed could be used to rescue his father. If Chappy was willing to go on such a mission, Doug could provide intelligence, aerial recon, and even a qualified pilot. When Chappy is not interested, Doug accuses him of being apathetic like everyone else. After twenty-two years of active duty, Chappy feels insulted, and tells Doug to look after his family. At his graduation, Doug remembers how his father allowed him to practice flying an F-16. On the ground, a superior officer tells Ted that he heard music in the cockpit. Ted makes up an excuse, and reprimands his son for being careless. After Ted reminds Doug that he is not supposed to be in the plane at all, he compliments his flying skills. After graduation, Elizabeth Masters tells her sons that their father will be hanged in three days. At home, Doug tells his brother, Matt, that he has a rescue plan, and asks him to round up their friends, who collect intelligence and other data for the mission. In prison, Col. Akir Nakesh demands that Ted sign a confession, but he refuses. Doug visits Chappy at home, and shows him the intelligence. Once Chappy sees how serious Doug is, he agrees to help. Later, Chappy remembers what an impression Ted Masters made when he settled a misunderstanding in the flight simulator room between Chappy and some other officers. However, Chappy wants to be completely sure that Doug can fly an F-16. Chappy and Doug go for a test flight. Doug misses several targets until he plays his rock music, and makes good. Chappy, Doug, and friends spend several hours studying the physical layout of the prison where Ted is being held, and going over every detail of the mission. The next day, Doug and Chappy take off in twin F-16s without arousing suspicion. As they approach the enemy airstrip, Chappy instructs Doug to destroy the runway. Afterward, Doug shoots down a MiG on his tail. They follow two other MiGs as they retreat, and experience ground fire. Chappy announces his F-16 is damaged. He wants Doug to split off and take out a MiG, as he handles the other one. When Doug questions the order, Chappy insists that Doug listen to a special inspirational tape he recorded. Both Doug and Chappy shoot down their respective MiGs, but Chappy’s plane is damaged beyond repair. He tells Doug he is not going to make it, and crashes into the ocean. On the tape, Chappy tells Doug he has a gift for flying, and if he reaches down deep enough he can pull off the miracle his father deserves. Chappy explains he has recorded tips for every part of the mission to keep Doug focused. Col. Nakesh orders his men to mobilize all anti-aircraft units in search of the attackers. Chappy’s tape tells Doug that there is a good possibility that the enemy has not spotted him on their radar, and will be looking for more than one F-16. Soon, Doug hits another airfield and knocks down a communications tower. Doug sends a radio message to Col. Nakesh, identifying himself as “Iron Eagle,” the leader of an American assault force sent to rescue Col. Ted Masters. He issues detailed instructions to have his father transported to a specific runway at the airport. When Doug realizes the colonel is stalling, he destroys the country’s largest oil refinery, the first of five strategic targets. Col. Nakesh orders his ground forces to surround the airport. Doug sees his father riding in a jeep as he approaches the runway. Enemy soldiers order Ted Masters to drive alone to the end of the runway. As the F-16 prepares to land, Ted is shot. Doug scraps the landing, and attacks ground forces. After he destroys the control tower, he turns the surrounding topography to rubble. Sustaining a wound in one arm, Ted takes cover by the jeep. As Doug returns to attempt a second landing, he drops a “Hades” bomb on the runway, producing a wall of fire that stops a group of soldiers in their tracks. Although Col. Nakesh orders his men to go after the Americans, they cannot penetrate the fire. Doug embraces his father and helps him back to the fighter jet. Col. Nakesh sends a few tanks to stop Doug, but he destroys them and takes off. In the air, five enemy MiGs chase the F-16 as Col. Nakesh commandeers a plane. One by one, Doug shoots down the MiGs until Col. Nakesh engages him in an aerial dogfight. Doug evades the colonel and shoots him out of the sky. Doug sees four more planes appear on the radar screen, but they turn out to be a squadron of Americans with team leader, Colonel Dwight Smiley. Col. Smiley agrees to assist Doug, and radios the MiGs that they are following an American F-16 in international air space. Not wishing to engage the Americans, the MiGs fly away. When Col. Smiley learns that Ted has been rescued, he comments that his orders are to escort the two to a West German air base. Doug asks if the pilots can assume the “lost man formation” in honor of Col. Charles “Chappy” Sinclair as they fly over the Mediterranean, and Smiley agrees. Doug also plays his father Chappy’s tape, which explains how his rescue was planned. At the German air force base, Doug discovers Chappy survived his crash. Both stand before an American tribunal. Head judge, General Edwards, informs them they violated nearly every section of the National Securities Act, and should be sentenced to twenty-five years in prison, but Edwards agrees to release them on condition the mission remains classified. Chappy responds that it would be more judicious to send Doug to the Air Force Academy to make use of his talents and to teach him the value of silence. Upon flying home, Chappy, Doug, and his father are greeted by family, friends, and a band. As the press attributes the rescue to a squadron of F-16 pilots, Doug’s friends congratulate him on his courage. Doug returns the wing insignia Chappy lent him during their mission, but Chappy tells him he earned the wings and can keep them. They salute each other, and hug. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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