Out of Bounds (1986)

R | 93 mins | Drama | 25 July 1986

Director:

Richard Tuggle

Writer:

Tony Kayden

Cinematographer:

Bruce Surtees

Editor:

Kent Beyda

Production Designer:

Norman Newberry

Production Company:

Fries Entertainment
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HISTORY

According to a 2 Mar 1986 LAT article, executive producer John Tarnoff hired television writer Tony Kayden to realize his idea of using the Los Angeles, CA, nightclub scene as a backdrop for a “fish out of water” story.
       Approximately 350 background actors, comprised of "actual street kids, runaways, and punks," were used in nightclub sequences, as noted in LAT.
       An 11 Dec 1985 HR news item, and a Columbia Pictures news release in AMPAS library files announced that principal photography would begin 9 Dec 1985 for ten weeks in the Los Angeles area. The 2 Mar 1986 LAT reported that the film’s budget was $9 million.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that filmmakers did location shooting at the Stardust Ballroom, a venue for emerging rock and roll bands that first gained popularity in the 1940s as a dance hall, and the Dirtbox, a shuttered after-hours underground nightclub located in downtown Los Angeles. A chase scene was filmed at Olvera Street, a Mexican marketplace, and both Melrose Avenue and Hollywood Boulevard were also used during filming.
       An invitation in AMPAS library files stated that a screening was held at 8:00 p.m., 18 Jul 1986 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, CA.
       The picture marked actor Jeff Kober’s theatrical film debut. ... More Less

According to a 2 Mar 1986 LAT article, executive producer John Tarnoff hired television writer Tony Kayden to realize his idea of using the Los Angeles, CA, nightclub scene as a backdrop for a “fish out of water” story.
       Approximately 350 background actors, comprised of "actual street kids, runaways, and punks," were used in nightclub sequences, as noted in LAT.
       An 11 Dec 1985 HR news item, and a Columbia Pictures news release in AMPAS library files announced that principal photography would begin 9 Dec 1985 for ten weeks in the Los Angeles area. The 2 Mar 1986 LAT reported that the film’s budget was $9 million.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that filmmakers did location shooting at the Stardust Ballroom, a venue for emerging rock and roll bands that first gained popularity in the 1940s as a dance hall, and the Dirtbox, a shuttered after-hours underground nightclub located in downtown Los Angeles. A chase scene was filmed at Olvera Street, a Mexican marketplace, and both Melrose Avenue and Hollywood Boulevard were also used during filming.
       An invitation in AMPAS library files stated that a screening was held at 8:00 p.m., 18 Jul 1986 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, CA.
       The picture marked actor Jeff Kober’s theatrical film debut.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1986
p. 3, 10.
Los Angeles Times
2 Mar 1986.
Calendar, p. 3-4.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jul 1986
p. 8.
New York Times
25 Jul 1986
p. 18.
Variety
23 Jul 1986
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Fries Entertainment Production
A Richard Tuggle Film
From Columbia-Delphi V Productions
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly op
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Const coord
Gen foreman
Paint foreman
Labor foreman
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Women's ward
Men`s ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus score prod by
Mus score prod by
Mus score eng by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Cableman
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Asst [sd] ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Unit pub
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Prod auditor
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Asst to Richard Tuggle
Asst to Messrs. Tarnoff & Rosenfeld
Asst to Messrs. Tarnoff & Rosenfeld
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Craft service
Animal trainer
Knife trainer
Prod asst
Prod asst
Dizz's apartment wall painting by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
SOURCES
SONGS
“Out Of Bounds,” written by Stewart Copeland and Adam Ant, produced by Adam Ant and Stewart Copeland, mixed by Dennis Herring, performed by Stewart Copeland with Adam Ant, Stewart Copeland appears courtesy of A&M Records
“Wild And Innocent Youth,” written by Blades/Keagy, produced and performed by Night Ranger, courtesy of Camel/MCA Records
“Little By Little,” written and performed by Robert Daigle
+
SONGS
“Out Of Bounds,” written by Stewart Copeland and Adam Ant, produced by Adam Ant and Stewart Copeland, mixed by Dennis Herring, performed by Stewart Copeland with Adam Ant, Stewart Copeland appears courtesy of A&M Records
“Wild And Innocent Youth,” written by Blades/Keagy, produced and performed by Night Ranger, courtesy of Camel/MCA Records
“Little By Little,” written and performed by Robert Daigle
“Shot In The Dark,” written by Paula Jean Brown and Jim Whelan, produced and arranged by Michael Lloyd for Mike Curb Productions, remixed by William Orbit, performed by Belinda Carlisle
“So Many Thangz,” written by Babyface, Dee and Daryl Simmons, produced by L. A. and Babyface for Deelesongz, Inc., performed by The Deele, courtesy of Solar Records
“Move,” written by Walter “Kandor” Kahn and Ray Monahan, produced by Walter Kahn, performed by Funk Crew, courtesy of Sunshine Recordings
“Run Away,” written and performed by Robert Berry, produced by Bruce Fairbairn
“American Girl,” written by Brie Howard, Hillary Shepard, D. B. Tressler and Miko Watanabe, produced by Dennis Herring, performed by The American Girls
“How Soon Is Now?,” written by Morrissey and Marr, produced by John Porter, performed by The Smiths, courtesy of Rough Trade Records and Sire Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Fresh Flesh,” written by Stiv Bator and Brian James, produced by Chris Tsangarides, performed by The Lords Of The New Church
“Electric Ocean,” written by Ian Astbury and William H. Duffy, produced by Steve Brown, performed by The Cult, courtesy of Beggars Banquet and Sire Records, a division of Warner Bros. Records
“Burnin’ Down The City,” written and performed by Sammy Hagar, produced by Ted Templeman, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Cities In Dust,” written, produced and performed by Siouxsie And The Banshees, courtesy of Geffen Records (U. S.) and Polydor Records (outside U. S.)
“Run Now,” written and performed by Tommy Keene, produced by Bob Clearmountain, courtesy of Geffen Records
“Raise The Dragon,” written by Richard Spellman and Sean Lyons, produced by Bob Sargeant, remixed by Pete Hammond, performed by Intimate Strangers
“Wild, If I Wanna,” written and performed by Y & T, produced by Y & T and Scott Boorey, courtesy of Geffen Records
Belinda Carlisle, The Lords Of The New Church, The American Girls and Intimate Strangers appear courtesy of I. R. S. Records.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 July 1986
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 July 1986
Production Date:
began 9 December 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 July 1986
Copyright Number:
PA295902
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by DeLuxe®
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28166
SYNOPSIS

In New Orleans, Louisiana, a trucker stops to investigate an overturned rig and is killed. The murderer, Roy Gaddis, steals kilos of heroin hidden in the rig. In DeWitt, Iowa, teenager Daryl Cage returns home to the family farm, and hears his mother arguing with her husband over Daryl’s plans to visit his older brother, Tommy, in Los Angeles, California, where he hopes to start a better life. She also tells her husband that she is leaving him. As Daryl packs his bags, his mother gives him a Missouri telephone number where he can reach her. On the flight to Los Angeles, Daryl meets a fledgling actress named Dizz. When he tells her he will be in town for the summer, she says she works at a restaurant called the Beanery. Soon, Tommy and his wife, Chris, greet Daryl, and throw his red duffel bag in the back of their car. At baggage claim, Roy Gaddis realizes that he has the wrong red bag and runs toward Tommy’s car, memorizing the license plate, “Contractr,” as the vehicle pulls away. Tommy shows Daryl to a guest apartment that he built with climbing vines that hide the front door from the street. The next morning, Daryl opens his duffel bag and discovers that it is filled with drugs. When he goes to the main house to talk to his brother, he finds both Tommy and Chris dead. As he reels from the shock, he picks up a gun lying on the floor. A neighbor stops by, and believes that he has caught Daryl committing a robbery. When the neighbor tackles Daryl, he panics and shoots the man. Daryl ... +


In New Orleans, Louisiana, a trucker stops to investigate an overturned rig and is killed. The murderer, Roy Gaddis, steals kilos of heroin hidden in the rig. In DeWitt, Iowa, teenager Daryl Cage returns home to the family farm, and hears his mother arguing with her husband over Daryl’s plans to visit his older brother, Tommy, in Los Angeles, California, where he hopes to start a better life. She also tells her husband that she is leaving him. As Daryl packs his bags, his mother gives him a Missouri telephone number where he can reach her. On the flight to Los Angeles, Daryl meets a fledgling actress named Dizz. When he tells her he will be in town for the summer, she says she works at a restaurant called the Beanery. Soon, Tommy and his wife, Chris, greet Daryl, and throw his red duffel bag in the back of their car. At baggage claim, Roy Gaddis realizes that he has the wrong red bag and runs toward Tommy’s car, memorizing the license plate, “Contractr,” as the vehicle pulls away. Tommy shows Daryl to a guest apartment that he built with climbing vines that hide the front door from the street. The next morning, Daryl opens his duffel bag and discovers that it is filled with drugs. When he goes to the main house to talk to his brother, he finds both Tommy and Chris dead. As he reels from the shock, he picks up a gun lying on the floor. A neighbor stops by, and believes that he has caught Daryl committing a robbery. When the neighbor tackles Daryl, he panics and shoots the man. Daryl grabs the duffel bag and the gun, and escapes. A driver reports Daryl’s erratic behavior outside the house. As police look for him, he jumps on the back of a motorcycle, holds the gun to the driver’s head, and orders him to drive. After a harrowing chase through downtown Los Angeles, the biker evades the police. They stop on Mulholland Drive, where the biker advises Daryl not to go to police. Daryl decides to seek out Dizz for help. On the bus ride to the restaurant where she works, Daryl hides the duffel bag in a vent. At a bar, Roy Gaddis learns from television news that Daryl is a robbery suspect at large. Daryl convinces Dizz that he is in serious trouble, and she agrees to help. In Venice Beach, two Drug Enforcement Agents, Murano and Ed Hurley, follow Gaddis, who visits his girl friend, and orders her to snoop around and alert him if Daryl surfaces. At Dizz’s apartment, Daryl calls his mother in Missouri, but the telephone number is no longer in service. Dizz sees a police drawing of Daryl on television, becomes frightened, and tries to escape in her car. After Daryl calms her down, she gives him a ride, and convinces him to confess. By phone, he tells his story to Lieutenant Delgado. They agree to meet at Olvera Street, but when two uniformed police officers and Lt. Delgado chase Daryl, he and Dizz evade them. Later, Dizz suggests that her friend, Marshall, can help spread the word that they have drugs for sale. That way, they can find Tommy’s killer without the police. Meanwhile, Dizz disguises Daryl by buying him fashionable clothes, aviator sunglasses, and dying his blond hair brown. They go around town, letting people know they have ten kilos of heroin to “move.” Meanwhile, Gaddis’s girl friend tells Marshall to let her know if he hears about the sale of a big shipment of drugs. Soon, Dizz and Daryl let Marshall know their interest in doing a drug deal. He asks them to meet him at the Stardust Club after midnight, and promises to put them in touch with the right buyer. As detectives investigate the crime scene at Tommy Cage’s house, they only find Daryl’s fingerprints. One detective believes Daryl may be innocent, but Delgado suspects Tommy may have intended to take the drug-filled duffel bag, and Daryl stole the contraband from his brother. At the Stardust Club, when Marshall introduces Daryl, Gaddis reaches for his gun. Daryl hits Gaddis over the head with a wine bottle. He and Dizz lock themselves in a room, but Gaddis shoots the door open and chases them onto the street, where the two hide in a dumpster. As they drive away, Dizz is exhilarated by the turn of events. However, Daryl believes the situation has become too dangerous and he must sort it out alone. Dizz complains that she has driven him all over the city and lost her job, and does not appreciate being abandoned. Daryl relents but says that moving forward, they cannot make any mistakes. They visit the bus depot and Daryl retrieves the duffel bag from the vent. On the streets of Hollywood, Gaddis threatens Marshall and demands he find Daryl. Dizz examines one of the drug-filled plastic bags and deduces that it is filled with heroin. When Daryl wonders what the entire shipment is worth, Dizz supposes it could fetch $1 million. Daryl calls Gaddis to set up a meeting at Pier E in San Pedro Harbor, to hand over the drugs in exchange for a few thousand dollars in getaway money. Daryl also informs Delgado of the plan. Gaddis arranges for his associate, Lemar, to murder Daryl and Dizz at the docks. Before the meeting, Daryl convinces Dizz to leave him at the dock. Drug agent Murano surprises Lemar, sitting in his car, and aims his gun at Lemar’s face, while agent Hurley spills gasoline from a pump in Lemar’s lap. As Gaddis approaches, Murano throws a lit cigarette at Lemar and the vehicle explodes. After watching the explosion from a safe distance, Gaddis finds Daryl’s duffel bag empty. He runs toward Daryl, but comes upon Dizz, sitting in her parked car. Dizz attempts to run over Gaddis, who clings to her windshield until she sandwiches him against a fence. Patrol cars appear, surrounding Gaddis, who holds them off with gunfire and absconds in a semi. Daryl chases the truck on foot, climbs on, and makes his way to the driver’s door. He and Gaddis exchange blows until the truck crashes through a fence, throwing Daryl to the ground. Gaddis escapes while Daryl spends the night sleeping on the pier. Gaddis hides out at his friend Gil’s apartment and demands painkillers for his wounds. Soon, Gaddis returns to his girl friend, who gives him Dizz’s address. When Daryl calls Dizz, she knocks the phone off the receiver so that he can hear Gaddis attacking her. Daryl reaches Dizz’s apartment and finds her missing. He searches the neighborhood, and learns Marshall’s address. When Daryl discovers Marshall dead in his apartment, Gaddis pulls out a shotgun and demands his heroin. Suddenly, the two drug agents ambush Gaddis, and a gunfight ensues. Daryl escapes through a window. When police arrive, Delgado discovers Murano dead in Marshall’s apartment. Meanwhile, Daryl and Dizz reunite at a nightclub, retrieve the heroin, and hide it in a blue duffel bag. While cruising in search of Daryl and Dizz, Gaddis’s girlfriend tells him of their whereabouts. The two set up a picnic on the roof of an abandoned building, and Dizz confesses that her real name is Darlene and she has yet to find work as an actress. Daryl tells her he does not care and kisses her. Later, Gaddis takes Dizz hostage as Daryl searches for an intruder. When he returns, Gaddis orders him to drop his gun and hand over the heroin. As Gaddis sticks his gun in Daryl’s ear, Hurley shoots Gaddis in the leg, but he jumps into a dumpster, and runs off limping. Daryl and Hurley have a confrontation. When Hurley claims that he has been after Gaddis since the murder in New Orleans, Daryl decides to help. At the police station, an associate tells Delgado that Murano and Hurley were suspended two months earlier, and their agency suspects they are crooked. A fingerprint expert demonstrates to Delgado that the prints found at the Cage home belong to Gaddis. As Daryl and Hurley chase Gaddis to Santa Monica Airport, Dizz arrives at the police station, identifies Gaddis from a photograph, and rides with Delgado to Venice Beach. Daryl and Hurley shoot at Gaddis’s plane as it taxis down the runway. Gil, the pilot, is killed, and Gaddis jumps out before the plane explodes. Hurley and Daryl chase Gaddis to a power plant, where Hurley appears to shoot Gaddis dead. Hurley unzips the blue duffel bag, and points his gun at Daryl as he slowly backs toward the door. Before Hurley can kill Daryl, Gaddis revives, grabs his gun, and kills Hurley. With his left hand, Daryl reaches for the gun lying on the floor, and slowly removes the knife strapped to his ankle. He throws the knife into Gaddis’s chest. With Gaddis dead, Daryl removes Tommy’s football championship ring from the killer’s finger and slides it on his own. Outside, he hands the heroin-filled duffel bag full to Delgado and reveals that there are two dead bodies in the building. As Delgado leaves to investigate, Dizz asks Daryl if he plans to return to Iowa. He responds that he would like to spend some more time with her, and they embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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