Blind Date (1987)

PG-13 | 95 mins | Romantic comedy, Adventure | 27 March 1987

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HISTORY

End credits include “special thanks” to: “The Ring Magazine; The DeVorzon Gallery; B-I Gallery; Guitar Center, Hollywood; The Culver Studios; California Film Office.”
       Writer Dale Launer came up for the premise for Blind Date after being set up on a date with a young woman who had a low tolerance for alcohol. The 10 Apr 1987 LAHExam reported hairdresser Nina Sussman was Launer’s blind date for the dinner at Gladstone’s seafood restaurant, where she caused a ruckus after just a few glasses of champagne. The evening was so embarrassingly memorable, Launer sold producer David Permut on the screenplay idea.
       Actor Sean Penn and pop singer Madonna were set to star in the movie, according to the 4 Sep 1985 HR. Considered an “it couple” after a high profile, six-month courtship and wedding in Aug 1985, the two were eager to work together, but opted instead to do Shanghai Surprise (1986, see entry), the 11 Nov 1985 People magazine reported. Penn dropped out of Blind Date, but Madonna stayed on.
       Joan Micklin Silver was originally set to direct the film, but Penn and Madonna vetoed her, according to the 4 Oct 1985 LA Weekly. Richard Benjamin was then signed, the 13 Oct 1985 LAT reported. However, Benjamin withdrew after a few months and director Blake Edwards took over the project, according to the 4 Apr 1986 DV.
       Actor Bruce Willis came onboard to play the lead, Blind Date being his first feature film lead role. Willis was popular with television audiences for his co-starring role in ... More Less

End credits include “special thanks” to: “The Ring Magazine; The DeVorzon Gallery; B-I Gallery; Guitar Center, Hollywood; The Culver Studios; California Film Office.”
       Writer Dale Launer came up for the premise for Blind Date after being set up on a date with a young woman who had a low tolerance for alcohol. The 10 Apr 1987 LAHExam reported hairdresser Nina Sussman was Launer’s blind date for the dinner at Gladstone’s seafood restaurant, where she caused a ruckus after just a few glasses of champagne. The evening was so embarrassingly memorable, Launer sold producer David Permut on the screenplay idea.
       Actor Sean Penn and pop singer Madonna were set to star in the movie, according to the 4 Sep 1985 HR. Considered an “it couple” after a high profile, six-month courtship and wedding in Aug 1985, the two were eager to work together, but opted instead to do Shanghai Surprise (1986, see entry), the 11 Nov 1985 People magazine reported. Penn dropped out of Blind Date, but Madonna stayed on.
       Joan Micklin Silver was originally set to direct the film, but Penn and Madonna vetoed her, according to the 4 Oct 1985 LA Weekly. Richard Benjamin was then signed, the 13 Oct 1985 LAT reported. However, Benjamin withdrew after a few months and director Blake Edwards took over the project, according to the 4 Apr 1986 DV.
       Actor Bruce Willis came onboard to play the lead, Blind Date being his first feature film lead role. Willis was popular with television audiences for his co-starring role in the successful romantic comedy detective series Moonlighting (American Broadcasting Company, 3 Mar 1985—14 May 1989), and producers hoped his popularity would transfer to the big screen as well.
       Madonna ultimately withdrew from the project, opting instead to star in Who’s That Girl? (1987, see entry). The singer-actress told the 2 Aug 1987 Chicago Tribune that her contract gave her approval over the script, co-star and director, but when she found out that Willis and Edwards had been signed, she decided to leave the project, rather than veto them.
       The 9 Apr 1986 LAHExam reported that actress Daryl Hannah was going to play the lead, but instead actress Kim Basinger was signed, according to the 10 Apr 1986 LAHExam.
       Principal photography began 5 May 1986 in the Los Angeles, CA, area, according to the 16 May 1986 DV production chart. Blind Date was on a tight ten-week production schedule because Willis had to start filming the third season of Moonlighting in mid-Jul, according to the 2 May 1986 HR. Promotional materials in AMPAS library files indicate the Bel Air, CA, mansion used for the wedding scenes once belonged to Hilton Hotels heir Baron Hilton. Many interior scenes were filmed at Laird Studios in Culver City, CA. The film had a $16 million budget according to the 20 May 1986 DV.
       Blind Date was initially scheduled for Dec 1986 release, according to the 11 Jun 1986 Var. That release was pushed back to Jan 1987, the 14 Sep 1986 LAT reported. However, the release was pushed back again to the end of Mar 1987 when producers decided to shoot additional scenes and a new ending. The 27 Jan 1987 HR announced new scenes were being shot at Laird Studios on weekends due to Willis’s filming schedule for Moonlighting. The 27 Feb 1987 HR indicated more scenes were being shot at the former Hilton mansion in Bel Air. The 2 Mar 1987 HR said the re-shoots were prompted after the film tested poorly.
       Test audiences apparently liked the new scenes and ending, as an advertising campaign that ran prior to the film’s release included audience comments from a 27 Feb 1987 test screening raving about the film. A large Blind Date advertisement that ran in the 13 Mar 1987 LAHExam included comments, “Super comedy,” “It’s the funniest movie I’ve ever seen,” and “Bruce Willis is a real star.” The 16 Mar 1987 DV reported the audience comments used in the ads were taken verbatim from the test screening comment cards, as required by distributor Tri-Star Pictures' legal department.
       Blind Date opened on 1,251 screens on 27 Mar 1987, earning $7.5 million in its first three days of release according to the 31 Mar 1987 DV box office chart. Two months after its release, the film was still playing on 826 screens and had earned $36.7 million according to the 27 May 1987 DV box office chart.
       Although Dale Launer wrote the initial script, revisions were done by husband and wife writing team Tom Ropelewski and Leslie Dixon, as well as director Blake Edwards, the 20 May 1986 DV reported. When Launer’s name fell off the revised script, he filed a grievance with the Writer’s Guild of America (WGA). After arbitration, the WGA panel ruled that Launer would receive the sole writing credit, the 14 Sep 1986 LAT reported.
       In 2003, Revolution Studios was interested in doing an updated version of Blind Date. The 22 Oct 2003 DV reported the studio had tapped writing team Peter Seaman and Jeffrey Price to re-imagine the film, while Lou Pitt was set to produce. No further information could be found about this project. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
2 Aug 1987.
---
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1986.
---
Daily Variety
16 May 1986.
---
Daily Variety
20 May 1986
p. 1,19.
Daily Variety
16 Mar 1987.
---
Daily Variety
27 Mar 1987
p. 3, 36.
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1987.
---
Daily Variety
27 May 1987.
---
Daily Variety
22 Oct 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1987
p. 3, 60.
LA Weekly
4 Oct 1985.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
9 Apr 1986.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
10 Apr 1986.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
13 Mar 1987
p. 21.
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
10 Apr 1987.
Section A, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
13 Oct 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Sep 1986.
---
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1987
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
27 Mar 1987
p. 11.
People
11 Nov 1985.
---
Variety
11 Jun 1986.
---
Variety
1 Apr 1987
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Co-starring:
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PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Tri-Star Pictures presents
A Blake Edwards Film
From B.E.E.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Chief lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Key grip
Grip best boy
Still photog
Video op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const foreman
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
MUSIC
Orig mus
Mus supv by
Mus supv by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Body makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod controller/Post-prod exec
Unit pub
Casting asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft service
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst to Mr. Edwards
Asst to Mr. Adams
Asst to Ms. Caroselli
Prod asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Art gallery des and created by
Filmed in
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Simply Meant To Be,” written by Henry Mancini, George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam, performed by Gary Morris and Jennifer Warnes, Gary Morris courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Jennifer Warnes courtesy of Cypress Records
“Treasures,” written and performed by Stanley Jordan, courtesy of Manhattan Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
“Anybody Seen Her!” written by L. Russell Brown and Billy Vera, performed by Billy Vera and the Beaters
+
SONGS
“Simply Meant To Be,” written by Henry Mancini, George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam, performed by Gary Morris and Jennifer Warnes, Gary Morris courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Jennifer Warnes courtesy of Cypress Records
“Treasures,” written and performed by Stanley Jordan, courtesy of Manhattan Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
“Anybody Seen Her!” written by L. Russell Brown and Billy Vera, performed by Billy Vera and the Beaters
“Oh, What A Nite,” written by Billy Vera, performed by Billy Vera and The Beaters
“Let You Get Away,” written by Billy Vera, performed by Billy Vera and the Beaters
“Crash, Bang, Boom,” performed by Hubert Tubbs.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
27 March 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 27 March 1987
Production Date:
5 May--mid July 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Tri-Star Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 December 1987
Copyright Number:
PA391397
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28340
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, when businessman Walter Davis cannot find a date to accompany him to a business dinner, his brother, Ted Davis, offers to set him up with his wife’s cousin, Nadia Gates. However, Ted’s wife, Susie Davis, warns Walter not to get Nadia drunk because she loses control and “gets real wild.” When Walter picks Nadia up, he is stunned by her beauty and wonders why she does not have a date every night of the week. Nadia says she was in a relationship that ended three months earlier. She moved back home to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but now has returned to Los Angeles. The two stop by an art gallery opening, but run into Nadia’s ex-boyfriend, attorney David Bedford, who is jealous of Walter and causes a scene. Nadia and Walter quickly leave. Walter stops by a grocery store to get a bottle of champagne, then takes Nadia to a recording studio to listen to his friend, Stanley Jordan, play guitar. Walter reports he once dreamed of being a professional guitarist until he discovered how little money he would make doing it. He says he is happy now because he has a good job and a car and plans to buy a condominium next year. Walter offers Nadia champagne, but she declines, saying the last few times she drank, she “went crazy.” However, Walter persuades her that one glass will not make her crazy. By the time she finishes one glass, Nadia says she is beginning to feel it. At the restaurant, a tipsy Nadia trips and grabs hold of Walter for balance, tearing his sports coat breast pocket in the process. After being seated, Walter ... +


In Los Angeles, California, when businessman Walter Davis cannot find a date to accompany him to a business dinner, his brother, Ted Davis, offers to set him up with his wife’s cousin, Nadia Gates. However, Ted’s wife, Susie Davis, warns Walter not to get Nadia drunk because she loses control and “gets real wild.” When Walter picks Nadia up, he is stunned by her beauty and wonders why she does not have a date every night of the week. Nadia says she was in a relationship that ended three months earlier. She moved back home to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but now has returned to Los Angeles. The two stop by an art gallery opening, but run into Nadia’s ex-boyfriend, attorney David Bedford, who is jealous of Walter and causes a scene. Nadia and Walter quickly leave. Walter stops by a grocery store to get a bottle of champagne, then takes Nadia to a recording studio to listen to his friend, Stanley Jordan, play guitar. Walter reports he once dreamed of being a professional guitarist until he discovered how little money he would make doing it. He says he is happy now because he has a good job and a car and plans to buy a condominium next year. Walter offers Nadia champagne, but she declines, saying the last few times she drank, she “went crazy.” However, Walter persuades her that one glass will not make her crazy. By the time she finishes one glass, Nadia says she is beginning to feel it. At the restaurant, a tipsy Nadia trips and grabs hold of Walter for balance, tearing his sports coat breast pocket in the process. After being seated, Walter and Nadia order more champagne. Walter’s co-worker, Denny Gordon, comes over and teases him about his torn jacket. Nadia, now drunk, says it is the latest fashion trend and then tears Denny’s breast pocket. Denny flirts with Nadia, slipping her his card. She is offended and calls Denny a “slimeball pig.” While Denny and Walter argue, Nadia goes to tell Denny’s date what he did. His date leaves without a word, and Denny chases after her. When Nadia causes a scene with a waiter, Walter’s boss, Harry Gruen, comes over to investigate and is accidently sprayed in the face with champagne. Nadia goes to Gruen’s table to talk to his dinner guests, millionaire Mr. Yakamoto and his wife, who is dressed like a geisha. Nadia causes a scene, ultimately pulling off Mrs. Yakamoto’s wig. An embarrassed Mrs. Yakamoto runs to the bathroom and Nadia follows, telling her that she does not have to be subservient to her husband and that she is entitled to fifty percent of her husband’s assets under California’s community property laws. Nadia returns to the dining room, announcing that Mrs. Yakamoto needs a divorce lawyer and that her husband is worth $100 million. Several people rush to help Mrs. Yakamoto, while Harry Gruen fires Walter. After they leave the restaurant, Nadia’s ex-boyfriend, David, finds them and is distressed that Walter let her drink. Walter and Nadia drive away, but David follows in his car. They elude David, then stop at a discotheque, where Nadia and Walter have a romantic slow dance. However, David arrives at the disco and starts a fistfight with Walter. Soon the entire dance floor is embroiled in a fight, while Walter and Nadia slip out. Nadia and Walter drive away, but when they get out of the car, thieves strip parts from Walter’s car, including the car seats. When they return to the car, three thieves try to rob Walter, but when police arrive, they throw their gun into Walter’s car. Believing Walter is drunk, the police make him do a field sobriety test, which he passes. When they drive away, sitting on boxes since the seats are gone, Nadia sobers up, saying that she has a chemical imbalance and is allergic to alcohol. David catches up with them and tries to run Walter’s car off the road, but instead David ends up crashing into a flour warehouse. Nadia wants to go home, but an angry Walter insists on taking her to a party in the Hollywood Hills which she mentioned earlier. There, Walter causes a scene, drinking too much, playing with the food on the buffet and even throwing pâté at a woman’s breasts. Nadia takes Walter upstairs, telling him to pass out on the bed, but David comes into the room a few minutes later and provokes a fight. Walter lunges at David and they both fall out the window, landing on tables of food. They continue fighting and Walter notices the gun in the back of his car. He starts shooting at David, telling him to dance. Police arrive to arrest Walter. The next morning, Walter’s brother, Ted, picks him up at the jail, but the hung-over Walter throws up in his car. When Ted reports that Nadia paid his bail, Walter demands to see her. He tells Nadia he will likely go to jail, but wants to know how much he owes her, so he can repay her, then never see her again. She tells him the bail was $10,000. Nadia asks David to represent Walter in court, pointing out that he is partially responsible for Walter’s legal problems. David agrees to defend Walter only if Nadia agrees to marry him. She reluctantly accepts. In court, Judge Harold Bedford chastises Walter for acting as his own attorney. Just then, David arrives, announces he is Walter’s lawyer and confers with the judge, who also happens to be his father. David tells his estranged father that he will move out of state if he finds Walter not guilty. However, David also wants his parents to host his wedding to Nadia at their home and invite their influential friends so he will have some big names to drop as he sets up a new law practice in another state. Harold Bedford agrees to his son’s terms and finds Walter not guilty. As they leave the courthouse, David tells Walter that he and Nadia are getting married. David’s sister-in-law, Susie, gives him a goodbye note from Nadia in which she apologizes for the trouble she caused. She says he is a wonderful man and encourages him to start playing guitar again. Shortly after, Walter buys a new guitar. He also buys a box of chocolates and uses a needle and syringe to inject them with alcohol. On the night before the wedding, Nadia spots Walter’s car parked near David’s parents’ house and gets excited. Walter hides in a tree overlooking the lawn where the wedding will take place, but a guard dog named Rambo spots him, so Walter dives into the swimming pool to get away. After everyone has gone to bed, Walter sneaks into the house to talk to Nadia, but is prevented by others moving around the house. The next morning, a messenger service delivers the box of chocolates laced with alcohol and Nadia eats almost the entire box. By the time Harold Bedford walks her down the aisle, Nadia is drunk. While the minister performs the ceremony, Nadia announces that she does not love David and asks the guests if two people should marry if they do not love each other. The guests say, “No,” but David insists he loves her more than anything. Nadia tells the guests she loves someone else. Hearing this, Walter comes out of the pool house to make his presence known. Nadia and Walter jump into the pool and kiss each other, as the guests applaud. Nadia and Walter get married and honeymoon on the beach as Walter serenades her with his guitar.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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