Fast Forward (1985)

PG | 110 mins | Musical | 15 February 1985

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HISTORY

       As announced in the 14 Nov 1983 DV, director Sidney Poitier held auditions for the picture, then titled Shoot Out, in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, for dancers around the ages seventeen and eighteen years old, reportedly seeing over 400 candidates for the seven lead roles. Referring to the film as Shootout, the 5 Dec 1983 DV announced that rehearsals were scheduled to begin in Mar 1984, with principal photography beginning on the Columbia Pictures production in May 1984.
       The 5 Dec 1983 HR reported that the screenplay, written by Richard Wesley, was based on an original story idea by Poitier, but only Timothy March receives onscreen story credit. Although HR stated that Poitier would serve as executive producer, he is credited onscreen as director. According to the 7 Dec 1983 Var, Shootout would be filmed completely in New York City for ten weeks, with an undisclosed budget. Var indicated that Poitier’s company, Verdon-Cedric Productions, Inc., had a contract with Columbia Pictures giving them exclusive rights to Poitier’s directing and producing services for four years.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files dated 18 May 1984 reported filming would begin 21 May 1984, in New York City, with the eight principal dancers chosen from the original 3,000 contenders.
       A 1 Aug 1984 production news release in AMPAS library files noted the title change to Fast Forward, and announced filming had completed under budget that day.
       A 27 Jul 1984 HR news item reported actor Michael Dante was expected ... More Less

       As announced in the 14 Nov 1983 DV, director Sidney Poitier held auditions for the picture, then titled Shoot Out, in New York City and Los Angeles, CA, for dancers around the ages seventeen and eighteen years old, reportedly seeing over 400 candidates for the seven lead roles. Referring to the film as Shootout, the 5 Dec 1983 DV announced that rehearsals were scheduled to begin in Mar 1984, with principal photography beginning on the Columbia Pictures production in May 1984.
       The 5 Dec 1983 HR reported that the screenplay, written by Richard Wesley, was based on an original story idea by Poitier, but only Timothy March receives onscreen story credit. Although HR stated that Poitier would serve as executive producer, he is credited onscreen as director. According to the 7 Dec 1983 Var, Shootout would be filmed completely in New York City for ten weeks, with an undisclosed budget. Var indicated that Poitier’s company, Verdon-Cedric Productions, Inc., had a contract with Columbia Pictures giving them exclusive rights to Poitier’s directing and producing services for four years.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files dated 18 May 1984 reported filming would begin 21 May 1984, in New York City, with the eight principal dancers chosen from the original 3,000 contenders.
       A 1 Aug 1984 production news release in AMPAS library files noted the title change to Fast Forward, and announced filming had completed under budget that day.
       A 27 Jul 1984 HR news item reported actor Michael Dante was expected to make a cameo appearance in the picture, but he is not credited onscreen.
       Although critical reception for Fast Forward was mixed, the Apr 1985 Box review reported $1.6 million in earnings from 1,162 theaters in the first four days of release.
      End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The producers wish to thank the New York City Mayor’s Office for Motion Picture and Television Production, the New York City Police Department, and the New York City Transit Authority.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Apr 1985.
---
Daily Variety
14 Nov 1983.
---
Daily Variety
5 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jul 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 1985
p. 3, 30.
Los Angeles Times
15 Feb 1985
p. 12.
New York Times
15 Feb 1985
p. 16.
Screen International
11 Aug 1984.
---
Variety
7 Dec 1983
p. 5.
Variety
5 Sep 1984.
---
Variety
13 Feb 1985
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
From Columbia-Delphi III Productions
A Vernon-Cedric Productions, Inc. Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
2d unit dir, New York crew
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Lighting consultant
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Co-ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead set des
Set des
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Stand-by painter
COSTUMES
Costumer
Asst costumer
Women's ward
Men's ward
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus score
Exec mus prod
Mus ed
Mus prod
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opt by
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
2d asst choreog
3d asst choreog
Dance asst
Dance consultant
Dance consultant
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
2d makeup artist
Hairstylist
2d hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Visual consultant
Scr supv
Unit pub
Exec asst to the prods
Prod coord
Utility man
Playback op
Loc mgr
Loc auditor
Transportation coord
Asst to Mr. Veitch
Craft service
Prod office coord, New York crew
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“That’s The Way It Is,” written by Preston Glass, Jeffrey Cohen, and Corrado Rustici, produced by Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions, performed by Narada Light Productions, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Breakin Out,” written by Mark Vieha, James Ingram, Ollie E. Brown, and Brock Walsh, produced by Mark Vieha and Brock Walsh, performed by John Scott Clough
“Give Me Tonight,” written by Chris Barbosa and Ed Chisolm
+
SONGS
“That’s The Way It Is,” written by Preston Glass, Jeffrey Cohen, and Corrado Rustici, produced by Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions, performed by Narada Light Productions, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Breakin Out,” written by Mark Vieha, James Ingram, Ollie E. Brown, and Brock Walsh, produced by Mark Vieha and Brock Walsh, performed by John Scott Clough
“Give Me Tonight,” written by Chris Barbosa and Ed Chisolm
“Lollipoppin’,” written and performed by Tom Scott, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Survive,” written by Tom Bahler and Brock Walsh, produced by Brock Walsh, performed by John Scott Clough
“How Do You Do,” written and produced by Brock Walsh and Mark Vieha, performed by John Scott Clough and Kip Lennon
“Showdown,” written by Jellybean, Stephan Bray, and Toni C., produced and mixed by John ‘Jellybean’ Benitez for Jellybean Productions, Inc., performed by Pulse featuring Adele Bertei, courtesy of Jellybean Productions, Inc.
“Curves,” written by Preston Glass and Narada Michael Walden, produced by Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions, performed by Deco, lead vocals by Siedah Garrett
“Do You Want It Right Now,” written by China Burton and Nick Straker, produced and mixed by John ‘Jellybean’ Benitez for Jellybean Productions, Inc., performed by Siedah Garrett
“Taste,” written by David Swanson and Siedah Garrett, produced by Narada Michael Walden for Perfection Light Productions, performed by Deco
“Hardrock,” witten by Herbie Hancock, Bill Laswell, and Derek Showard
“Mystery,” written by Rusty Anderson, performed by “The Living Daylights”
“Pretty Girl,” written by Jef Scott, performed by Jef Scott
“Fast Forward,” written by Brock Walsh, Tom Bahler, John Van Tongeren, and Bunny Hull, produced by Brock Walsh, performed by John Scott Clough, and Kip Lennon
“Long As We Believe,” music by Preston Glass, Narada Michael Walden, and Walter Afanasieff, lyrics by Tom Bahler and Siedah Garrett, produced by Perfection Light Productions, performed by Siedah Garrett and David Swanson.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 February 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 February 1985
Production Date:
21 May--1 August 1984 in New York
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 March 1985
Copyright Number:
PA240477
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Ultracam 35 camera and Ultranon lenses provided by Leonetti Cine Rentals
Duration(in mins):
110
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27561
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Sandusky, Ohio high school students Matt Sherman and Michael Stafford pose as waiters for a chance to meet New York City talent manager, Mr. Sabol, while he is visiting their small town. After badgering the man and his wife, Ida, over lunch, Mr. Sabol agrees to audition their dance troupe, “The Adventurous Eight,” if they are ever in New York City. The group meets after school to practice their singing and dancing routine and, six months later, “The Adventurous Eight” arrive by bus in New York City only to learn that Mr. Sabol has died. They beg his associate, Clem Friedkin, for the chance to audition, and he reluctantly agrees to consider them for the agency’s “Annual Shootout” talent search in three weeks' time, after he returns from a trip to Los Angeles, California. The group is uncertain how they will survive in the city for so long, but decide to use what little money they have to rent a one-bedroom apartment and set to work cleaning and decorating. As their funds deteriorate, Matt suggests the group perform an impromptu dance routine during a convention dinner at an upscale hotel. The guests are impressed, believing the routine was scheduled for their entertainment. When they pass around a collection plate, the group uses their earnings to buy a decent meal and have business cards made. Later, homesick dancer, Meryl Stanton, sneaks away to telephone her parents on a pay phone, but says nothing when they answer. Walking home, Meryl is accosted by a young man in her apartment stairwell, but her friend, Francine Hackett, comes looking for her, and prevents ... +


Sandusky, Ohio high school students Matt Sherman and Michael Stafford pose as waiters for a chance to meet New York City talent manager, Mr. Sabol, while he is visiting their small town. After badgering the man and his wife, Ida, over lunch, Mr. Sabol agrees to audition their dance troupe, “The Adventurous Eight,” if they are ever in New York City. The group meets after school to practice their singing and dancing routine and, six months later, “The Adventurous Eight” arrive by bus in New York City only to learn that Mr. Sabol has died. They beg his associate, Clem Friedkin, for the chance to audition, and he reluctantly agrees to consider them for the agency’s “Annual Shootout” talent search in three weeks' time, after he returns from a trip to Los Angeles, California. The group is uncertain how they will survive in the city for so long, but decide to use what little money they have to rent a one-bedroom apartment and set to work cleaning and decorating. As their funds deteriorate, Matt suggests the group perform an impromptu dance routine during a convention dinner at an upscale hotel. The guests are impressed, believing the routine was scheduled for their entertainment. When they pass around a collection plate, the group uses their earnings to buy a decent meal and have business cards made. Later, homesick dancer, Meryl Stanton, sneaks away to telephone her parents on a pay phone, but says nothing when they answer. Walking home, Meryl is accosted by a young man in her apartment stairwell, but her friend, Francine Hackett, comes looking for her, and prevents a crime from occurring. The next day, “The Adventurous Eight” perform for money on the streets of Manhattan. During the show, Matt meets a socialite named Susan Granger, and later joins her for an expensive lunch date, where she hires the group to perform at her party in the Hamptons. Matt’s girl friend and fellow dancer, June Wolsky, is displeased about Matt’s meeting with Susan. Over time, the group continues their street performances and explore the city. One night, Susan invites the group to a dance club where Caesar Lopez, leader of a rival group, challenges them to a dance-off. Afterward, Caesar warns them to stop performing on the streets. Later, Meryl and Francine are harassed outside of their building by a few men, but the girls kick them and run away. Eventually realizing that the group's dance steps re not good enough for the audition, "The Adventurous Eight" go to dance clubs to learn new moves. Susan later takes Matt and Michael to the ballet, and Michael sees her attempting to seduce Matt. While walking home, Meryl and Debbie Hughes are attacked and beaten by the previous assailants. Police officers arrive to rescue the girls, and telephone their fathers, who fly in from Ohio. The girls plead to stay another two weeks until the audition, and, after visiting their apartment, the fathers grant permission. Elsewhere, Matt spends the day with Susan in the Hamptons, where they share a kiss. June waits for Matt to return, unhappy about his indiscretion. After their performance in the Hamptons, Susan’s disapproving mother, Jessie Granger, catches her daughter kissing Matt, prompting June to break up with Matt and leave the group. However, the girls take June out for drinks, become intoxicated, and convince her to stay. Matt challenges Caesar to another dance-off so the group can practice their new moves, and “The Adventurous Eight” are victorious. When Clem Friedkin returns from Los Angeles, he refuses to let the group audition, explaining that his scouts were not impressed by the group’s street performances. Matt prods Clem and learns that Susan’s mother uses her association with Clem to get him to reject the group. Matt decides to appeal directly to Mr. Sabol’s widow, Ida, and he and Michael visit the woman at her home. Remembering the boys from her visit to Ohio, she agrees to return to their apartment and watch the group perform. After, Ida confronts Clem about refusing “The Adventurous Eight” from auditioning, and the two argue about how she has been running the business since her husband's death. When Clem bans Ida from attending the auditions, she returns to the dancers’ apartment and tells them about the argument. Despite feeling dejected, Ida is inspired, and agrees to manage the group herself, promising to get them into the “Annual Shootout” audition. At the “Shootout,” Ida disguises herself as a punk rocker and sneaks the dance group into the theater where the auditions are being held. Before their performance, Matt insists that June stay in the group and decides he will leave instead. Michael reveals to June that Susan was simply using Matt to provoke the jealousy of her boyfriend, Mark Dalton. As the group takes the stage, Clem struggles to stop them, but after seeing their performance, he asks Ida to bring the dancers to his office to discuss a deal. Ida asserts she is going to regain control of the company and force Clem out. Onstage, the group takes a bow, and Matt kisses June. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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