Ladyhawke (1985)

PG-13 | 121 mins | Adventure, Fantasy | 12 April 1985

Director:

Richard Donner

Cinematographer:

Vittorio Storaro

Editor:

Stuart Baird

Production Designers:

Wolf Kroeger, Sid Cain

Production Companies:

Warner Bros., Inc., Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “With loving memory to ‘Little Pasta’.” Transportation crew member Nando Cartocci’s name is misspelled in end credits as “Cartucci.”
       The 7 Aug 1979 DV reported that producer Antonio Santillan renewed his option on the script for Ladyhawke, written by Edward Khmara, and was scheduled to start filming in spring 1980.
       According to the 11 Mar 1981 LAT, Richard Donner was set to direct for the Ladd Company. At the time, Czechoslovakia was chosen as the location. The 24 Mar 1981 HR reported Donner was flying that day to Prague, Czechoslovakia, to scout locations.
       The 29 Aug 1981 Screen International announced a delay in production from Oct 1981 to early 1982, citing unspecified pre-production problems. A news item in the 26 Nov 1982 DV reported Twentieth Century-Fox and Warner Bros. would co-produce the picture, taking over from the Ladd Company.
       According to the 3 May 1983 Var, the $15 million film was scheduled for a sixteen-week shoot, starting late summer 1983. The 2 Aug 1983 HR announced filming began that day, near L’Aquila, Italy. Var also announced an expected release date of summer 1984, but the film did not premiere until Apr 1985.
       The 1 Nov 1983 LAHExam reported unspecified troubles during production resulting in an estimated $10 million cost overrun. However, Richard Donner reported filming was going smoothly, and that he would be less than $1 million over budget, according to the 7 Nov 1983 LAHExam. Announcing production would ... More Less

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “With loving memory to ‘Little Pasta’.” Transportation crew member Nando Cartocci’s name is misspelled in end credits as “Cartucci.”
       The 7 Aug 1979 DV reported that producer Antonio Santillan renewed his option on the script for Ladyhawke, written by Edward Khmara, and was scheduled to start filming in spring 1980.
       According to the 11 Mar 1981 LAT, Richard Donner was set to direct for the Ladd Company. At the time, Czechoslovakia was chosen as the location. The 24 Mar 1981 HR reported Donner was flying that day to Prague, Czechoslovakia, to scout locations.
       The 29 Aug 1981 Screen International announced a delay in production from Oct 1981 to early 1982, citing unspecified pre-production problems. A news item in the 26 Nov 1982 DV reported Twentieth Century-Fox and Warner Bros. would co-produce the picture, taking over from the Ladd Company.
       According to the 3 May 1983 Var, the $15 million film was scheduled for a sixteen-week shoot, starting late summer 1983. The 2 Aug 1983 HR announced filming began that day, near L’Aquila, Italy. Var also announced an expected release date of summer 1984, but the film did not premiere until Apr 1985.
       The 1 Nov 1983 LAHExam reported unspecified troubles during production resulting in an estimated $10 million cost overrun. However, Richard Donner reported filming was going smoothly, and that he would be less than $1 million over budget, according to the 7 Nov 1983 LAHExam. Announcing production would wrap in two weeks, the 28 Nov 1983 DV reported the $17 million picture was only three days behind schedule.
       Ladyhawke was released in Apr 1985, and the Jun 1985 Box reported earnings of $2.5 million after three days, in 1,056 theaters. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jun 1985.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1979.
---
Daily Variety
26 Nov 1982.
---
Daily Variety
28 Nov 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1981
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1985
p. 3, 33.
LAHExam
1 Nov 1983.
---
LAHExam
7 Nov 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Mar 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1985
p. 1, 13.
New York Times
12 Apr 1985
p. 5.
Screen International
29 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
3 May 1983.
---
Variety
3 Apr 1985
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. and Twentieth Century Fox Present
A Lauren Shuler Production
A Richard Donner Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr, Italy
U.K. prod mgr/1st asst dir
Italian 1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Still photog
1st cam op
2d cam op
1st cam asst op
2d cam asst op
Clapper/Loader
Clapper/Loader
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Visual concepts artist
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
2d asst ed
2d asst ed
Italian asst ed
Trainee ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Draftswoman
Draftsman
Draftswoman
Const labor
Stand-by painter
Prop master
Propman
Prod prop buyer
Swing gang lead
Const coord
MUSIC
Mus score prod by
Mus comp and cond
Mus ed
Keyboards
Keyboards
Guitars
Bass guitar
Mus rec eng
Mus rec eng
Mus rec eng
Mus rec eng
Mus copyist
SOUND
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Visual eff des by
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff asst
Addl visual eff supv
Chief visual eff cam
Opt photog supv
Opt eff supv
Visual eff asst ed
Opt layout
Opt cam op
Opt cam op
Opt cam op
Opt cam op
Visual eff and main titles des by
Addl opt eff and end titles by
MAKEUP
Chief makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Consultant
Casting, London
Casting, Italy
Scr supv
Fights arr
Horse master
Animal trainer
Trainer, Hawks & wolves
Trainer, Hawks & wolves
Trainer, Hawks & wolves
Horse trainer
Italian horse wrangler
Unit mgr
Unit pub
Video system tech
Blacksmith foreman
Asst to exec prod, Italy
Asst to prod, Italy
Asst to prod, Italy
Asst to prod, Italy
Exec asst to Richard Donner, U.S.
Exec asst to Richard Donner, Italy
Exec asst to Lauren Shuler
Asst to Harvey Bernhard, U.S.
Asst to prods
Asst to prods
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Payroll clerk
Transportation mgr
Transportation
Transportation
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Unit driver
Crowd marshall
Unit runner, Italy
Unit nurse
Prod secy
Dial coach
STAND INS
Stunt arr
Italian stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Anim supv
Anim cam
COLOR PERSONNEL
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 April 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 12 April 1985
Production Date:
2 August--mid December 1983 in Italy
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc. & Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
1 July 1985
Copyright Number:
PA252493
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Technovision®
Prints
Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
121
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Countries:
Italy, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27654
SYNOPSIS

A young man named Phillipe “The Mouse” Gastone escapes the dungeons of Aquila through a sewage drain, a prison that no one has ever escaped. The Bishop is furious, and orders Captain Marquet to organize a manhunt. Phillipe, a petty thief, steals money from a guard, and flees into the woods, where he takes clothes and boots from villagers. He arrives at a pub, and brags about his escape to the cloaked guards searching for him. As they attempt an arrest, Phillipe wriggles away, but is eventually captured. During the struggle, he accidentally cuts Marquet’s face with a knife, and the captain orders Phillipe’s death. However, a man named Captain Etienne Navarre comes to the rescue, shooting arrows at the guards. Navarre greets one of the guards as an old friend, named Francesco. Out of spite, Marquet shoves Francesco into Navarre’s sword, killing the man. Navarre fights the other guardsmen and leaves on horseback, with his hawk following behind. He plucks Phillipe from the road, and takes him along. Sometime later, Navarre and Phillipe seek shelter at the barn of a peasant couple. As the sun sets, Phillipe gathers wood, and is spooked by a growling sound. He runs back to the barn, where the peasant man sneaks up behind him, prepared to murder him with an axe and steal his money. However, a wolf mauls the peasant to death. Phillipe aims a bow and arrow at the wolf, but is stopped by a beautiful, mysterious woman who appears out of nowhere. She walks into the woods with the wolf, while Phillipe prays ... +


A young man named Phillipe “The Mouse” Gastone escapes the dungeons of Aquila through a sewage drain, a prison that no one has ever escaped. The Bishop is furious, and orders Captain Marquet to organize a manhunt. Phillipe, a petty thief, steals money from a guard, and flees into the woods, where he takes clothes and boots from villagers. He arrives at a pub, and brags about his escape to the cloaked guards searching for him. As they attempt an arrest, Phillipe wriggles away, but is eventually captured. During the struggle, he accidentally cuts Marquet’s face with a knife, and the captain orders Phillipe’s death. However, a man named Captain Etienne Navarre comes to the rescue, shooting arrows at the guards. Navarre greets one of the guards as an old friend, named Francesco. Out of spite, Marquet shoves Francesco into Navarre’s sword, killing the man. Navarre fights the other guardsmen and leaves on horseback, with his hawk following behind. He plucks Phillipe from the road, and takes him along. Sometime later, Navarre and Phillipe seek shelter at the barn of a peasant couple. As the sun sets, Phillipe gathers wood, and is spooked by a growling sound. He runs back to the barn, where the peasant man sneaks up behind him, prepared to murder him with an axe and steal his money. However, a wolf mauls the peasant to death. Phillipe aims a bow and arrow at the wolf, but is stopped by a beautiful, mysterious woman who appears out of nowhere. She walks into the woods with the wolf, while Phillipe prays for protection. In the morning, Phillipe and Navarre continue their journey, and Phillipe tells him about the woman, and the wolf that saved him. Navarre is intrigued that he spoke to the woman. Elsewhere, Marquet reports to the Bishop that Navarre has returned. The Bishop asks if Navarre has a hawk with him, and demands that the hawk remain unharmed. Navarre tells Phillipe that his quest is to kill the Bishop of Aquila with his family sword, and asks that Phillipe, having escaped from inside, guide him into the walled city,. Phillipe admits he is frightened of the magical forces surrounding Navarre, and refuses. Navarre throws his sword at Phillipe, however, and he agrees to help. That night, Navarre ties Phillipe to a tree. Phillipe sees the woman in the woods and asks her to untie him, blaming his predicament on the guards. When he is freed, he runs away. In the morning, the Bishop’s guards capture Phillipe. Navarre and the hawk search for him, and are ambushed by the guards. During the battle, the hawk is accidentally shot by an arrow. Navarre fights off the guards and rushes to help the bird. He instructs Phillipe to take the hawk to a monk named Imperius, threatening his life should he fail. At the ruined castle in which Imperius resides, the monk is alarmed to hear of the hawk’s injury. Phillipe sneaks into the room where the hawk waits, and finds the mysterious woman, shot with an arrow, lying in its place. She asks if Navarre has been harmed, and Phillipe realizes that she is the hawk. Imperius banishes Phillipe, and treats her wound, while a wolf howls outside. Phillipe asks Imperius if Navarre is the wolf, and learns the woman’s name is Isabeau. Imperius tells him of Isabeau’s arrival in Aquila years before, and how every man, including the Bishop, fell in love with her. However, Isabeau sensed the Bishop was evil and denied him, inspiring his obsession. Isabeau and Navarre were secretly in love. Imperius admits he betrayed the lovers when he drunkenly revealed their secret to the Bishop. Out of revenge, the Bishop used dark powers to curse them in order to never allow them to touch as humans. He made Isabeau become a hawk during daylight, and Navarre a wolf at night. Elsewhere, the Bishop hires a hunter named Cezar to kill the wolf and find Isabeau. As Isabeau recovers, she asks Phillipe about Navarre. He exaggerates the words of love Navarre spoke about her. Imperius tells Phillipe he found a way to break the curse, but the Bishop must remain alive in order to do so. The Bishop’s guards arrive at the ruined castle, and Imperius fights them off while Phillipe hides Isabeau in a tower. Isabeau falls over the edge, and Phillipe grabs her hand. She slips from his grasp as the sun rises, turns into a hawk, and flies from harm. Navarre arrives, thanking Imperius for healing Isabeau. Imperius tells him he has discovered a way to break the curse, explaining that in three days time, there will be a day without night, and a night without day. Navarre must confront the Bishop, with Isabeau in human form, and the spell will be broken. However, Navarre does not believe this is possible, and still insists on killing the Bishop. Phillipe tells Navarre that Isabeau, whom he nicknamed “Ladyhawke,” has hope in him, and offers to guide Navarre into Aquila. Navarre warns him not to mention the possibility of breaking the curse to Isabeau, and Phillipe tells Imperius to secretly follow them to the kingdom. They rest for the night in a stable, and at sunset, Phillipe meets Isabeau in human form. He exaggerates what Navarre said, but relays the sentiments of love. Phillipe takes Isabeau into the village for a drink, and on the way, they encounter Cezar. Isabeau screams when she sees the wolf pelts he carries. Phillipe calls her name to calm her, and Cezar discovers she is the woman he is searching for. Phillipe wields Navarre’s sword in protection, and Cezar departs. Isabeau follows Cezar into the woods and when a wolf is trapped, she believes it to be Navarre, and prepares to attack Cezar with a knife. Navarre appears as the wolf, and Isabeau protects him by pushing Cezar into a trap, which closes on his face, and kills him. In the morning, Navarre asks Phillipe about the night before. The hawk flies in, and lands on Phillipe’s arm instead of Navarre’s. His curiosity piqued, Navarre questions Phillipe, who admits to having feelings for Isabeau, but reveals that she only speaks of Navarre. He exaggerates Isabeau’s words, but is complimentary to Navarre, who tells Phillipe that hawks and wolves mate for life. Sometime later, Imperius confronts Navarre on the road, and implores him not to kill the Bishop, but Navarre refuses to listen. That night, Phillipe shares Imperius’s plan with Isabeau, and she helps them set a trap for the wolf, to prevent him from killing the Bishop. However, the wolf falls through a frozen lake, and they race to its rescue. Phillipe jumps in the icy water, and suffers scratches saving the wolf. When the sun rises, Isabeau and Navarre nearly touch, as their bodies transform from animal to human. Navarre asks for his sword, and Phillipe lies, saying it fell in the river. Furious, Navarre attacks Phillipe, but stops when he sees the scratches on his chest. Imperius tells how he saved Navarre’s life. Navarre asks forgiveness, and instructs Imperius to cage him while in wolf form, and deliver him to the Bishop. Meanwhile, Phillipe sneaks into the cathedral of Aquila through the drainpipes. Navarre plans to attack the Bishop during mass, and tells Imperius that if he hears the bells, he’ll know he failed. If that happens, he begs Imperius to take Isabeau’s life, and end her suffering. When Phillipe unlocks the cathedral doors, Navarre rides in on horseback, and confronts the Bishop. He fights Marquet, who protects the Bishop, and during the struggle, a skylight is broken. Elsewhere, Phillipe retrieves Navarre’s hidden sword. As Navarre approaches the Bishop, he sees an eclipse through the skylight, and finally understands how night and day could co-exist. Navarre races to stop Imperius from killing Isabeau. However, Marquet attacks him, and a swordfight ensues. The cathedral bells are accidentally rung during the battle, and Navarre believes Imperius has killed Isabeau. Phillipe arrives and throws his sword to Navarre, who defeats Marquet. The Bishop warns that the curse will last forever if he is killed, but Navarre asserts that Isabeau is dead. As he raises his sword to strike, Isabeau enters the cathedral and calls his name. Navarre sees her for the first time in years, and the Bishop hides his face in shame. Navarre forces him to watch, and see the curse broken. Isabeau approaches the Bishop, and drops her leather hawk jesses at his feet. When she turns her back, the Bishop strikes, but Navarre kills the Bishop. Isabeau and Navarre finally embrace. They call Phillipe and Imperius to their sides, and thank them for their help and friendship. Navarre lifts Isabeau into the air, and she proclaims her love for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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